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ARTICLES Techniques Make Your Own Gear
Members Only MYOG: Contoured Side Panels for Improved Load Carry in Frameless Packs
by David Chenault
Overpacking is a major issue with frameless packs. Implementing side panels can help distribute your load in a more effective way. Read More...
ARTICLES Techniques Make Your Own Gear
Members Only MYOG: Supplex Pants
by Jerry Adams
Step by step guide to simple, lightweight, inexpensive trekking pants. Read More...
ARTICLES Techniques Make Your Own Gear
Members Only MYOG: Backpack Design
by Luke Schmidt
Tips and tricks expand upon previously published articles: check out Luke's six iterations and glean ideas for perfecting YOUR custom-made pack! Read More...
ARTICLES Techniques Make Your Own Gear
Members Only MYOG: eVent Rain/Wind Jacket
by Jerry Adams with editorial assistance from Addie Bedford
Turning 2.5 yards of high performance fabric into a lightweight, breathable rain jacket. Read More...
ARTICLES Techniques Make Your Own Gear
Members Only Make Your Own Gear: Snow Stakes Revisited
by Roger Caffin
After using the original snow stakes in extreme conditions, the design has been enhanced to extend the life of both your snow stakes and your guylines. Read More...
ARTICLES Techniques Make Your Own Gear
Members Only MYOG Titanium/Carbon Fiber Ice Axe
by Steven Evans and Roger Caffin
Following the Review of the ULA Helix Potty Trowel, there was considerable discussion on the Backpacking Light Forum (MYOG, DIY walking axe) regarding the use of a light "ice axe" in areas where one's life or ultimate safety would not be an issue. The author, Steven Evans, asked specific questions regarding the required length of such an ice axe, the general use of such an ice axe, and what people used in situations where a UIAA-certified ice axe would be overkill, but where a tool of some sort would be nice to have. Such a tool could be used to assist in small steep sections of snow and ice and general up-hill travel in less then desirable conditions, but it would have a weight which would be negligible on one's back when not in use. This project was born from that discussion. Read More...