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M A Survey of Water Hazards and Water Treatment Methods - Part 4: Chemical Methods

by Roger Caffin, with help from Will Rietveld, Ray Estrella and Rick Dreher

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Article Summary:

There are several chemicals suitable for water treatment: most of them work as 'oxidants'. That is, the chemical has a high enough redox potential that it can cause damage to the DNA of the offending bugs. This makes them 'pesticides', and to be sold in America these need EPA approval (as discussed previously). In general, the products rely on one of several chemicals:

There is a hazard with the use of any chemical treatment. If the water is full of organic matter the chemical may be absorbed into that matter and may not manage to kill all the bugs. For this reason chemical treatment should only be used on clear or filtered water.

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