Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review

The Power Lizard lays claim to the lightest two-person double-wall tent in the world, but does that make it the best one?

Overall Rating: Above Average

The Power Lizard merits our Above Average rating because it’s roomier (!), lighter, better designed in some ways, and less expensive than the Terra Nova Laser. But that doesn’t mean a whole lot because the tent simply does not provide enough space to comfortably accommodate two people, it has only one entry door, and ventilation is inadequate (but better than the Laser).

About This Rating

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by Will Rietveld |

Introduction

The Power Lizard UL is Vaude’s lightest tent. At 2 pounds 5.4 ounces (1060 g) measured total weight, it’s also the lightest two-person double-wall tent to be found anywhere, beating the Terra Nova Laser by nearly a half pound. As a matter of fact, the Power Lizard UL is strikingly similar to the Terra Nova Laser, which was recently reviewed by Backpacking Light. So how does the Power Lizard match up to the Laser?

Further, many superlight tents (like the Laser) achieve their low weight by downsizing the tent; so how does the Power Lizard stack up as far as roominess and comfort for two people? And how did they come up with that name?

Specifications

Year/Manufacturer/Model 2010 Vaude Power Lizard UL (vaude.com)
Style Three-season, two-person, double-wall, non-freestanding tent with floor and one side entry door with vestibule
Included Tent body and fly, 3 aluminum poles with sack, 8 stakes with sack, storage bag
Fabrics Fly is 20d ripstop nylon silicone coated two sides, 3000 mm, seam taped; inner tent is 15d polyester fine mesh; floor is laminated ripstop nylon, 10,000 mm
Poles and Stakes One aluminum center hoop pole and 2 aluminum end struts, DAC Featherlite 7.5 mm 7001 T6 aluminum; stakes are 6 in (15 cm) titanium shepherd hook
Floor Dimensions and Inside Height Measured dimensions: 89 in (226 cm) long x 45 in (114 cm) wide at head end x 36 in (91 cm) wide at foot end; center height 35 in (89 cm), end height 18 in (46 cm)
Features Lightweight fabrics, side entry door with vestibule, 2 mesh storage pockets, two end vents
Packed Size 16 in x 5.5 in (41 cm x 14 cm)
Total Weight Measured weight 2 lb 5.4 oz (1.06 kg), manufacturer specification 2 lb 5 oz (1.05 kg)
Trail Weight Measured weight 2 lb 4.5 oz (1.04 kg), manufacturer specification not available (excludes stuff sacks)
Protected Area Floor area 23.8 ft2 (2.21 m2), vestibule area 5.2 ft2 (0.48 m2), total protected area 29 ft2 (2.69 m2)
Protected Area/Trail Weight Ratio 12.7 ft2/lb (2.6 m2/kg)
MSRP US$400

Design and Features

Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review - 1
Vaude Power Lizard double-wall two-person tent on a cold windy early summer morning at 12,600 feet (3,840 m) in the southern Rockies.

The Vaude Power Lizard UL is a two-person double-wall tent with one side entry door and one vestibule. The inner tent and fly are connected and set up as a unit, which simplifies setup and keeps the interior of the tent dry when setting up in the rain. The tent is supported by one lightweight aluminum center hoop pole and a 21-inch (53-cm) vertical strut on each end. The poles are DAC Featherlite 7.5 mm 7001 T6 aluminum, which are very strong. This tent design minimizes the number and length of poles required to support the tent, while still resulting in an easy to set up taut tent that has excellent wind and storm resistance.

The Power Lizard incorporates some notable innovations and advances. The fly is silicone coated on both sides, which is an advancement because heretofore larger companies have been reluctant to use silnylon because of its flammability. The siliconized fly is claimed to have 6-12 times more tear strength compared to a PU-coated fabric and 3-4 times more UV resistance. And the fly is seam taped on the inside using Vaude’s own process of ultrasonic welding, which is the first use of seam tape on silnylon that I know of. Finally, the floor is a very lightweight laminate, with a very high hydrostatic head.

As noted, the Terra Nova Laser tent utilizes the same basic design, as does the Tarptent Scarp 1 and 2 (double-wall) and Tarptent Moment (a single-wall tent). After I have fully described the Power Lizard and commented on its performance, I will relate it to the Terra Nova Laser and Tarptent Scarp and Moment tents for some interesting comparisons.

Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review - 2
Views of the Vaude Power Lizard UL. The tent has one center hoop pole that provides the main support for the tent (top left). Each end (top right) is supported by one vertical external pole that fits tightly in a sleeve at the top and a grommet at the bottom. There is a protected vent at each end. The top view (bottom left) shows the shape of the tent. Entry is through a zippered door to the left of the center pole, and is protected by a vestibule (bottom right).

Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review - 3
Outside features. The poles and stakes provided with the Power Lizard (top left) are quite light. The three aluminum poles weigh just 6.9 ounces (196 g), and the eight titanium shepherd hook stakes weigh just 1.5 ounces (42.5 g). I added the Easton tubular stakes to better secure the ends of the tent. The tent body attaches to the hoop pole with some strong clips (top right) that grasp and hold; they don’t slide once they are clipped on. The entry vestibule (bottom left) is 18 inches (46 cm) wide at the center. Here’s a close up view of one of the end vents and strut pole (bottom right).

Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review - 4
Inside features. The outer door ties back with a loop and toggle, and the inner door rolls to the left and secures with a loop and toggle (top left). The tent is extra long (89 inches/226 cm), so the best way to utilize interior space and maximize headroom, is to sleep with feet all the way to one end. Doing that provides about 24 inches (61 cm) of storage space at the head end of the tent (top right), which is to the right of the entry. The floor is just barely wide enough to fit two standard width sleeping pads side by side (bottom right) and still be able to zip the door closed. The tent has two side by side mesh storage pockets at the head end (bottom left).

Performance

Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review - 5
I tested the Power Lizard on several solo backpacking trips where I camped at high altitudes (12,600 to 12,700 ft/3,840 to 3,871 m) in early summer (left, and first photo at the top of the review) and experienced some strong winds at night, with gusts up to about 30 mph (48.3 kph). My wife and I also slept in the Power Lizard several nights while volunteering on the Hardrock 100 endurance race near Silverton, Colorado (right). I also used it on some summer backpacks where I got caught in some torrential downpours.

The Power Lizard is average for ease of set-up. The tent and fly are attached to each other and set up as a unit, which is good. The set-up process is to spread the tent out on the ground, insert the end poles, attach the center hoop pole, stake one end, then extend the tent and stake the other end, and finally stake out the corners and guylines. The end poles fit tightly in their grommets and require some muscle. Similarly, the clips fit very tightly on the hoop pole and require some muscle to put them on and get them off (I think they’re over-engineered a bit!). The whole process takes about five minutes.

As a solo tent, the Power Lizard is luxurious. It has more than enough room inside the tent and in the vestibule for me and my gear. I am 6 feet (1.83 m) tall, and found the inside headroom (claimed to be 37 inches/94 cm, measured to be 35 inches/89 cm) to be adequate if I slept with my feet to one end, placing my head closer to the center of the tent.

On two windy nights at high elevation, I tensioned the tent at bedtime, but it still flapped quite a bit during the night and was fairly noisy. The flapping came from the unsupported canopy to each side of the center hoop pole. Outside of the flapping, I still found the Power Lizard to be very wind stable; its tapered shape handles wind quite well.

In the southwestern US, we have something we call the summer monsoons, which is afternoon thunderstorms with strong wind gusts and very heavy rain. I experienced two torrential events while testing the Power Lizard. Again, the tent flapped a lot in the wind, but it held steady. Since the fly is silnylon, the tent sags a lot when it gets wet, to the point where the fly is contacting the inner tent. After re-tensioning, the tent stays tauter, but it’s hard to get out and do that during a thunderstorm!

So, how does the Power Lizard accommodate two sleepers? As mentioned, the tent has only one entry door, so you know what that means - the person in the back has to step over the person in front in order to enter/exit the tent. The first time my wife saw the Power Lizard set up, she said something like: “Oh my God, are both of us going to fit in there?” Actually we did, but it helped that my wife is short. It also helps for one person to enter the tent and get settled before the other person comes in, and it further helps to leave the inner door open to provide a little extra elbow room. In summary, space is very limited, including headroom, but it’s workable for two people who are close friends.

It’s notable that the inner tent is made of a thin fabric rather than no-see-um mesh, so the Power Lizard retains heat fairly well if the inner door is closed at night. With two people in the tent on a chilly night, I measured a temperature difference of 12-15 F (7-8 C) between the inside of the tent and outside.

Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review - 6
Finally, I note that the Power Lizard has reasonably good ventilation, so there is little condensation when there is some air movement. However, on one calm night with a large temperature drop down to about 25 F (-4 C, with the inner tent door open and vestibule zipped shut), we had so much condensation on the inside of the fly that it was dripping down on us. The amount of condensation was equivalent to a single-wall tent. Also, note the amount of sagging when the tent is wet.

Comparisons

The following table compares the Vaude Power Lizard UL with tents of a similar design.

Tent Floor Area ft2 (m2) Vestibule Area ft2 ( m2) Ventilation Mfr.Weight oz (g) Cost US$
Vaude Power Lizard 23.8 (2.21) 5.2 (0.48) 2 end vents 37 (1050) 400
Terra Nova Laser 20.8 (1.93) 7.0 (0.65) 2 end vents inside the fly 43.7 (1239 ) 509 (as of 7/24/10)
Tarptent Scarp 1+* 19.0 (1.77) 12.5 (1.16) 2 top vents plus raised side walls 44 (1250) 295
Tarptent Scarp 2 31.0 (2.9) 12.0 (1.11) 2 top vents plus raised side walls 54 (1530) 325
Tarptent Moment** 18 (1.67 ) 6.6 (0.61) 2 top vents, 2 end vents, mesh perimeter 28.8 (810) 215
*The Tarptent Scarp 1 is a one-person double-wall tent with two doors and vestibules.
**The Tarptent Moment is a one-person single-wall tent, but it shares the same design as the other tents.

Some highlights and observations from the comparison table:

  • The Vaude Power Lizard UL is 6.7 ounces (190 g) lighter (based on manufacturer data) than the Terra Nova Laser, granting it claim to the lightest two-person double-wall tent in the world.
  • The Power Lizard costs US$109 less than the Laser, and it comes with “real” stakes – eight titanium shepherd hook stakes to be exact.
  • The Power Lizard also has a little more floor area than the Laser, but the Laser has two entry doors, while the Power Lizard only has one.
  • The Power Lizard has better ventilation than the Laser, but neither tent has really good ventilation. Neither has a top vent, and the fly extends to the ground on both tents.
  • The Tarptent Scarp 1+ is a one-person double-wall tent that has nearly as much floor space as the European two-person tents, and twice the vestibule area. It weighs a little more than the Power Lizard, but it has two doors, much better ventilation and costs US$105 less.
  • The Tarptent Scarp 2 has much more floor and vestibule area for two people and costs US$75 less, but it weighs a pound more than the Power Lizard.
  • For comparison, the Tarptent Moment, a single-wall tent with the same design, has nearly the same protected area as the European tents (two-person!), weighs 8-15 ounces (227-425 g) less, and costs half as much as the European tents. However, it has similar condensation problems.

Assessment

When you read my experience with two people sleeping in the Power Lizard, and Ray Estrella’s similar account for the Terra Nova Laser, you quickly realize that these tents are miniaturized to lay claim to the honor of “lightest two-person double-wall tent in the world.” (Either that or Europeans are very small people!) From a PR standpoint, that’s quite an accomplishment, but from a user’s standpoint it’s only meaningful for two very small people who are good friends. For the rest of us, these amount to fairly roomy one-person tents, and pricey ones at that.

For someone who wants a double-wall one-person tent, the Power Lizard is a good candidate. Some of the design details are better than the Terra Nova Laser, and one door is enough for one person. But, as the comparison table above shows, the Tarptent Scarp 2 has much more room inside, is a better value, and has much better ventilation, albeit a pound heavier. It is also easier to enter, has more usable space, and has better headroom. Further, the Tarptent Scarp 1+ (a one-person single-wall tent) nearly equals the Power Lizard for floor and vestibule space, has the other advantages mentioned for the Scarp tents, and weighs a half pound less.

Bottom line, the Vaude Power Lizard UL can claim its record for lightest two-person double-wall tent, but it’s not a very roomy or convenient two-person tent (unless you’re an exhausted adventure racer and you don’t care). It’s much more suitable as a one-person tent, but that said, there are better options on the market.

What’s Good

  • At 37 ounces (1049 g), it’s the lightest two-person double-wall tent available
  • Side entry protected by a vestibule
  • Strong aluminum alloy poles and titanium stakes
  • Two functional end vents
  • Two mesh storage pockets
  • Gear in the entry vestibule can easily be reached from inside the tent
  • Extra long length will accommodate tall hikers (but headroom is limited)
  • Very wind stable and storm worthy
  • Plenty of space for one person plus gear

What’s Not So Good

  • Only one entry door
  • Too little space to comfortably accommodate two people
  • Limited headroom
  • Canopy flaps in the wind
  • Expensive
  • Clips are difficult to attach and remove from the pole

Recommendations for Improvement

  • Add top vents
  • Use lighter and easier to attach clips
Disclosure: The manufacturer provided this product to the author and/or Backpacking Light at no charge, and it is owned by the author/BPL. The author/Backpacking Light has no obligation to review this product to the manufacturer under the terms of this agreement.


Citation

"Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review," by Will Rietveld. BackpackingLight.com (ISSN 1537-0364).
http://backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/vaude_power_lizard_ul_tent_review.html, 2010-10-26 00:00:00-06.

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Forum Index » Editor's Roundtable » Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review


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Addie Bedford
(addiebedford) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review on 10/26/2010 16:38:33 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review

Dan Durston
(dandydan)

Locale: Cascadia
Thanks on 10/26/2010 16:59:06 MDT Print View

Thanks for the review. It looks a little too narrow and low on headroom to be my 2 person tent of choice.

I'm hoping that the Easton Kilo will live up to it's claimed specs of a 910g weight, 44" roof height and a 56" x 91" floor when it comes out in the spring. If it can get close to that, it'll be a much more livable 2 person tent for less weight.

Edited by dandydan on 10/26/2010 16:59:41 MDT.

Lucas Boyer
(jhawkwx) - MLife

Locale: 38.97˚N, 95.26˚W
re: on 10/27/2010 08:21:36 MDT Print View

Thanks Will. I looked at a few 2 person "lightweight" tents for my wife and I, plus our K9 troop. The lack of space and price points sent me to a Mid. With the mid I can set up the mid only to ride out afternoon storms or just sleep under it when the dogs aren't along. When conditions dictate, I can set up the bug shelter underneath. Sure, I don't have the weight savings of the Lizard, but I'm 6'5" and my sanity/marriage depend on a bit of elbow room in the morning/evening.

Keith Roush
(skier) - MLife

Locale: San Juan Mountains
light tents on 10/27/2010 10:36:37 MDT Print View

Great report. I think I'll continue to use a single-wall tent in blustery/rainy/snowy conditions when I don't use a tarp or mid. My single walls never sag when wet and have very little wind noise.

I use a Black Diamond Lighthouse for backpacking and some lightweight motorcycle touring (Durango-Maine-Quebec-Durango last year) and a Bibler Awahnee for more extreme conditions above 15,000 or Winter mountaineering. Both of these set up very tight with no pegs at the floor but 2-4 midpoint guylines to rocks, skis or brush.

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review on 10/27/2010 11:00:12 MDT Print View

I'm really surprised that the Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 wasn't added to the comparison charts. The stats listed on BPL's review of the Fly Creek 2 would suggest that it may be the closest competitor to the Power Lizard.

The Fly Creek weighed in at 38.24 oz and the Power Lizard at 36.5. The Fly Creek has a floor area of 28 Sq ft and the Power Lizard has 23.8 sq ft. I'd argue that if the Fly Creek used the same Ti shepard hooks that the Power Lizard uses, it would be a lighter 2 person double wall shelter (the aluminium stakes for the FC weigh in at 4 oz.).

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review on 10/27/2010 11:03:37 MDT Print View

The hooped pole and side entry design links the "comparable" tents.

The Fly Creek is far different, and IMHO, has far less usable volume.

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review on 10/27/2010 14:58:40 MDT Print View

>> The hooped pole and side entry design links the "comparable" tents. <<

OK, oversight on my part (comparable design).

The usable space thing is a personal thing. Either tent will require you to know your partner very well and I prefer not to climb over somebody in the middle of the night. YMMV.

I do like that it's a double wall though.

Cas Berentsen
(P9QX) - MLife
tents & weights on 10/28/2010 17:04:35 MDT Print View

According to Sackundpack (german outdoor shop) the moment weighs 830g, the scarp 1 with solid inner weighs 1442g and the scarp 2 1750g. If those measurements are accurate the Scarps are far less attractive.

I own a 1p terra nova laser comp (TNLC). Although its claimed weight is 890g, the weight for normal usage (incl. decent pegs + polecover) is +/-1050g. This makes the Power lizard even a decent alternative for the TNLC, although its headspace of 89cm might be too limited for a person of 6'4".

( Other Characteristics of the TNLC are similar to the Laser and the Power lizard. Warm but condensation prone and poor ventilation )

For a solo hiker equipped with hiking poles the lightheart solo (27oz/765g advertised) might be a decent alternative.

Gordon Bedford
(gbedford) - MLife

Locale: Victoria, Australia
Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent condensation on 10/28/2010 21:00:04 MDT Print View

Perhaps I have missed something but what happens to the condensation that builds up under the fly if you cannot separate the fly from the inner. Unless the inner of the fly can be dried before it is packed then the whole lot will become wet.

Thanks for the review.
Gordon

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review on 10/28/2010 21:35:53 MDT Print View

My Scarp 1 was 1260g when delivered before seam sealing.
(each batch is a bit different)
That is fly/inner/stff sac and pole.
The supplied Easton pegs (6x 8') are 90g however that is not a fair comparison with the TN type.
Weight is important but of course usable space headroom and ventilation are important too ....
Note that the total covered area is about 2 feet larger under the Scarp 1.
oh, and yes you can detach the inner if you like.
Franco

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent condensation on 10/28/2010 23:29:45 MDT Print View

> what happens to the condensation that builds up under the fly if you cannot
> separate the fly from the inner.

Well, in many years of snow camping with a double-wall tunnel tent (which I never split up), that has never been a problem. If the condensation is water, it seems to evaporate and dry off fairly easily. Anyhow, the light inner fabric cannot hold much water, so there's little to worry about. And pitching the inner first in pouring rain is simply stupid imho.

And if the condensation is ice ... well, tough. I do remember once opening my tent up 2 days later after we had got home, and the ice fell out of it. Fortunately, I did that outside! Normally, the inner tent sheds the ice next evening.

It really is NOT a problem, ever.

Cheers

Johnathan White
(johnatha1) - F

Locale: PNW
Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review on 10/29/2010 09:57:08 MDT Print View

Anyone other than me notice a pattern evolving here?

Pretty soon I bet we will see a 2-person, double walled tent tipping the scales at 20 oz. with a whopping 16 Sq’ of floor space.

I do not know if they are just trying to market the "2-person tents" as simply a roomy one person, but tents are starting to shrink to the square feet of most of my 1-person tarps and tents.

I understand the quest to go lighter, but let's compare apples to apples, not grapes to apples.

Edited by johnatha1 on 10/29/2010 10:01:11 MDT.

Gordon Bedford
(gbedford) - MLife

Locale: Victoria, Australia
Vaude Power Lizard UL and condensation on 10/31/2010 01:11:03 MDT Print View

Well Roger I would say that you have about ten more years of experience of walking and snow camping than my 38 but obviously different experiences influence ones thinking and preferences.

I also prefer a "double wall pitch the fly first" style tents. But day after day of walking in the rain, when it is raining when the tent is pitched and raining when it is packed away can cause you to have a wet fly inside and out. I have seen and experienced tents packed up as one unit and they become wet miserable affairs. It is fine if the weather is nice in the morning or in the afternoon. The tent will dry out, both inner and fly. That is also my experience with tarptents, not that I dislike them. Horses for courses.

The other great thing about being able to split the inner and unpitch the fly last is that when the winds are blowing and the rain is falling you can pull down the inner, sit under the fly nicely sheltered and pack your gear, put on your wet weather coat etc then venture out into the storm to whip down the fly.

By the way I also have "pitch the inner first" style tents and it is possible to pitch and unpitch them when it is raining (but not too windy)without getting the inner wet. Admittedly it works best with at least three or four people.

But the result of my experience and that is not just my own tents but 1000's of school kids worth of tent nights plus trips with friends; is that I would never buy a tent where the inner couldn't be separated from the fly.

Best regards,
Gordon

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Vaude Power Lizard UL and condensation on 10/31/2010 01:37:32 MDT Print View

Hi Gordon

> I have seen and experienced tents packed up as one unit and they become wet miserable affairs.
Different tents maybe?
My experience has mainly been with the Macpac Olympus and my 2-man double-wall 3 and 4 pole tents. Yeah, I've had a wet inner tent many times. But the walls on all those tents don't hold much water - maybe a good DWR on the inner tent. So they are not a problem.

> The other great thing about being able to split the inner and unpitch the fly last
> is that when the winds are blowing and the rain is falling you can pull
> down the inner, sit under the fly nicely sheltered and pack your gear, put
> on your wet weather coat etc then venture out into the storm to whip down the fly.
??????? Huh ?????? (sorry)
I can't count the number of times we have fully dressed and fully packed inside the tent in a storm, then right at the end pulled it down as a single unit, packed it away on the top of my pack and started walking. How else would one do it?

I guess if you want to split the tent after it has been pulled down it might get messy, but I haven't done that in 20 years. I find it simply unnecessary: we share weight in other ways. And keeping the tent together is so much faster!

> pitch the inner first" style tents .... it works best with at least three or four people.
Ah yes, I have seen videos of groups pitching tents in a storm. Very amusing, some of them. But I have to be able to pitch and strike our tunnel tent single-handed in a storm - which I can do very easily. Even if I have to crawl around the tent, as in "When Things Go Wrong".

> I would never buy a tent where the inner couldn't be separated from the fly.
Not going to argue with you there. ALL my double-skin tents can be split. Great stuff, Velcro. I just never split them in the field.

Cheers

Edited by rcaffin on 10/31/2010 01:38:40 MDT.

John Davis
(Bukidnon) - F
Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review on 10/31/2010 13:37:59 MDT Print View

"Perhaps I have missed something but what happens to the condensation that builds up under the fly if you cannot separate the fly from the inner. Unless the inner of the fly can be dried before it is packed then the whole lot will become wet."

In my experience, Gordon, I end up carrying the condensation to my next pitch. I have never successfully shaken all of the rain and condensation off a tent and prefer not to hang around until Britain's weak sun dries the shelter, so I end up hauling water I can't drink.

Disconnecting the Akto's inner is a slight pain, given its 14 points of attachment, but has to be done when the fly is wet or everything ends up soaked. I can't see it being any different for any other all in one pitching tent. Water gets on everything once it's inside the shelter's stuff sack.

I have pitched tents at lunchtime, and for out and back summit dashes, to dry them out but that just attracts more rain.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Vaude Power Lizard on 10/31/2010 13:59:38 MDT Print View

"Disconnecting the Akto's inner is a slight pain, given its 14 points of attachment, but has to be done when the fly is wet or everything ends up soaked. I can't see it being any different for any other all in one pitching tent. Water gets on everything once it's inside the shelter's stuff sack."

Strange - I have never had the inner wetted out in this case. Are you leaving the door open on the inner?

Gordon Bedford
(gbedford) - MLife

Locale: Victoria, Australia
Re: Vaude Power Lizard UL Tent Review on 11/03/2010 17:14:32 MDT Print View

I agree John. I disconnect my Akto inner if the fly is wet before I pack up. Just trying to keep my inner drier.Of course as Roger has pointed out pitching and unpitching with both connected is quicker. That's the beauty of that style of tent.

I first encountered fly "pitched first tents" in The UK back in 1980. I bought one. They made sense in wet environments, which can be true of SE Australia (especially Tasmanania) at times. I bought a Fjallraven two pole A frame in 1976. It could be pitched that way also with a bit of fiddling. Obviously the Scandanavians were experimenting and the Hilleberg tents being the outcome. The Kiwis were developing their own versions about then also.

All the best,
Gordon