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Gossamer Gear Spinshelter

in Shelters - Tarps & Floorless

Average Rating
4.00 / 5 (6 reviews)


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Mark Verber
( verber )

Locale:
San Francisco Bay Area
Gossamer Gear Spinshelter on 08/02/2005 13:22:46 MDT Report Post Print

Rating: 4 / 5

Wonderfully light-weight shaped tarp for solo use. Very protective, even in extreme conditions which means I can forgo a bivy sack which I would have needed to use with a small tarp. Non-stretch materials minimizes re-staking in the middle of the night. Significantly slower to pitch than a number of single wall shelters now on the market. Not a lot of headroom if you do a use a full lock down pitch. This has been my primary solo shelter since Nov 2004. If half points were permitted, I would rate it a 3.5. See my more complete long term spinnshelter review

Edited by verber on 02/05/2008 23:38:50 MST.

John Chan
( ouroboros )
Not idiot-proof on 08/18/2005 12:07:01 MDT Report Post Print

Rating: 5 / 5

As with any light gear, the Gossamer Gear Spinnshelter isn't idiot-proof. Its really good on its own... the lock-down pitch allows you to forego the use of a bivy sack in really wet conditions, and I really like the flexible door options. However, keep in mind that while the corner stakeouts are strategically re-inforced the side stake-outs aren't and should be lightly tensioned. I treated all the tie-out and ridgeline stitches with Sil-Net to strengthen them.
Best strength-function/ weight shelter on the market IMHO.

Chad McClenathen
( cmcclenathen )
Good shelter when you don't need one. on 05/14/2006 09:56:46 MDT Report Post Print

Rating: 1 / 5

Live and learn. My experience started with one of the two pullouts separating completely from the shelter as I pitched it in my yard per the instructions. Believe me, not much pressure was being applied at the time. An examination revealed it was never properly stitched so my kind wife sewed it back on and reinforced the other pullout. After repair, pitched several times using different configurations and decided it was ready for a trail test. Just spent 4 days in the Shenandoah Nat'l Park and sure am glad there are shelters. First, I found setup anything but quick. It is a slow tedious process as you first stake and then restake. In my opinion it is extremely difficult to get a taut pitch in the field when dealing with real world conditions and not a sodded yard with no rocks. In full protection mode, wind blows under the sides unless you place stones on the edges to secure to the ground. Rain comes through the opening where the trekking poles protude through the peaks. In a steady rain, the shelter sags terribly under the weight of the rain. As I laid in my down bag on my back, my feet were barely visible through a small area as the shelter sides were almost touching the bag. Forget about packing your backpack in there or changing clothes as you have to be a contortionist to move about in the small area that remains useable in the front. Cooking was out of the question. The thought of trying to set it up the next night after hiking all day in the rain led me to a trail shelter and convinced me that a real tent will be in my pack the next trip. Would recommend this shelter only if you use a bivy sack and enjoy the challenge of dealing with misery on the trail.

Anthony Weston
( anthonyweston )

Locale:
Southern CA
kept me dry in rough conditions on 08/13/2010 16:09:04 MDT Report Post Print

Rating: 5 / 5

Most excellent tarp, it kept me dry during a early snow storm in Hoover Wilderness last year with high winds. I like the flexability of the different positions it can be pitched in and it's well made. This has been my favorite shelter for the last 2 years.

Shop Hoover products at GearBuyer
Rodney Mruk
( rodney_mruk - M )

Locale:
Northeast Oregon
Good tarp on 03/24/2011 22:08:09 MDT Report Post Print

Rating: 5 / 5

I used the SpinnTwinn for my 300 mile trek on the Washington PCT south from Canada in 2010. It proved very worthy and was not difficult at all when setting up. That being said, it is a tarp. Inherent with tarps is staking and restaking to get a taught pitch. It can be set up in a lean to sort of configuration.

Yes it is true, when staked in the storm mode directly to the ground, there is very little head room. But I only do this when there is a storm. I was still able to cook, change clothes and everything else. But I would not want to spend an entire day inside it waithing for a storm to pass by.

So I am moving on to a pyramid style single wall tent. Check out Bear Paw Pyra-tent in cuben fiber at only 13 oz!

I am holding on to my SpinnTwin because it is a good piece of gear and has its place in my hiling style.

Shop Bear Paw products at GearBuyer
Steven McAllister
( brooklynkayak )

Locale:
Atlantic North East
Light and flexible on 05/25/2011 09:48:26 MDT Report Post Print

Rating: 4 / 5

The GG Spinnshelter has much of the flexibility of a flat tarp, but easier pitch in a storm-proof mode.

It sheds wind well and is fairly roomy when pitched high.
You may not be able to fully sit up if you have a long torso when pitched tight to the ground.

Has more stake-out points than most shelters, which can be good or bad depending on your opinion.

The extra stake points allow a good solid unflappable pitch.

I find it pitches fairly easy in wind, with some practice and does a very good job of shedding wind when pitched tight.

I know this as it seems like the times I've used this shelter have been on very windy nights.

I have the older solid white version. I don't like the color for my backpacking style as it really stands out, making it hard to stealth camp. That is why I gave it a 4 rating.

Edited by brooklynkayak on 05/25/2011 09:49:21 MDT.

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