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Backpacking Light STIX (2008)

in Trekking Poles

Average Rating
2.80 / 5 (5 reviews)


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Aaron Wallace
( basilbop )
Backpacking Light STIX (2008) on 09/24/2008 15:15:47 MDT Report Post Print

Rating: 4 / 5

Unlike other Komperdell-made poles, the tips of the STIX poles are not a separate somewhat flexible plastic part. Instead, the basket retainer is reduced to a ring of plastic around the CF, and the carbide tip is attached directly to the tapered end of the pole.
I was concerned about this type of construction in the Sierra, where it's all too easy to wedge the pole tip between rocks (or wooden bridge planks) and torque the pole. However, the poles survived 220 miles of such abuse on the JMT. Also surprisingly, the exposed CF below the baskets showed less abrasion and wear than I'd expected.
One concerning weakness is that the carbide tips started to separate from the pole. They never were loose enough to pull out, and never separated from the pole by more than a few millimeters, but it was disconcerting: it was doubtful that the bare CF tips would survive 100+ miles of use. I used a few drops of superglue to secure them, but I don't know how much that helped.

Jay Wilkerson
( Creachen )

Locale:
East Bay
Tough and Lite on 01/04/2009 18:33:18 MST Report Post Print

Rating: 4 / 5

I am very impressed with the STIX. I ordered the 130cm length and did a 8 mile loop with them with no problems. I really like the 130cm length which goes great with my GG Spinntwinn Tarp. The 130cm Stix way 4.4oz each!! IMHO that is SUL-very SUL!! They came with two sets of baskets for snow and regular terrain. The hand loops fill comfortable and sleek. Time will tell if they can survive a long trek but so far so good!!!

Jonathan Ryan
( Jkrew81 - M )

Locale:
White Mtns
Stix on 01/05/2009 14:16:42 MST Report Post Print

Rating: 4 / 5

All in all a great trekking pole. It is durable,light and very stiff. I have taken several dives on them and they have held up very well. My only complaint is that the tip and grip area are not replaceable. For someone that wants their gear to last a long time this is a big downer.

Daniel Cox
( stilldtc )

Locale:
The desert
Not quite so durable as some say on 01/30/2009 13:25:19 MST Report Post Print

Rating: 1 / 5

Living in rocky southern Arizona has taken quite a toll on these poles. After just 2 overnighters, I took these poles out to inspect them and remove the straps to see how I liked strapless poles. I find that one of the handles has become unglued and now rotates freely around the pole (didn't try to see if it would come off if I pulled on it, but I'm betting it would), and that one of the carbide tips has fallen off on the other pole (there is a very small nick in the pole bottom, but it is otherwise perfectly flat where the tip was). Maybe I received a bad pair, but at this point all I have to describe these poles is a flurry of expletives.

Edited by stilldtc on 01/30/2009 13:26:40 MST.

Timothy F Mulligan
( tmulligan )
Would not recommend on 08/17/2009 11:47:24 MDT Report Post Print

Rating: 1 / 5

I purchased two sets of these poles, one each for my son (125cm) and me (130cm). I loved the lightness, but we each had tips break over the course of a 12-day Philmont trek (rocky terrain).

When I contacted manufacturer's rep regarding possible warranty repair they directed me to BPL. BPL only offered a discount on new poles.

If these poles had a flexible tip as many other poles do, they would have survived intact. This is a case where adding a little weight would make the product much more durable.

My son and I were the only ones in our group of 12 with pole problems and the only ones with these poles.

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