Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW

The Kestrel provides the technically-minded backpacker much more useful information than a multi-function watch, and is easier to use.

Hightly Recommended

Overall Rating: Highly Recommended

The Kestrel is a precision weather instrument. It’s lightweight, durable, waterproof and easy to use. It measures and records loads of useful information for outdoor enthusiasts who want to better know their playground (and how their gear performs). It’s easier to use than a typical multi-function watch and provides more, and more-useful information for backpackers. On the downside, it’s a little heavier than a multi-function watch, is easier to lose, and doesn’t have stopwatch, alarm, or digital compass functions (but the model 4500 does).

About This Rating

M Find other top product reviews »

Print Jump to Reader Comments

by Will Rietveld |

Introduction

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW - 1
The Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker measures myriad parameters-including wind speed and elevation-and stores them in memory for field review and later downloading.

If you're a person who wants to know the actual numbers:

  • What was the wind speed on top of that peak?
  • What is the wind chill right now (wind chill is the combined effect of the wind and temperature)?
  • Why does if feel so miserably hot right now (the heat index measures the combined effect of temperature and humidity)?
  • Why did we get so much condensation in the tent last night, but not the night before?
  • How cold did it get last night, and how much colder is it on the valley floor?
  • How much warmer is it in my tent compared to outside?

If you "need to know," then you are a good candidate to own a Kestrel Pocket Weather Tracker. Nielsen-Kellerman makes a full line of Kestrel weather instruments ranging from a minimal feature set (model 1000) to the "top dog" (now the 4500) that measures a wide range of environmental conditions. The 4000 series stores data and uploads it to a computer for later evaluation, even charting. The 4000 even measures barometric pressure and has a barometric altimeter that is easy to set and use. Future generations will probably include a GPS!

This remarkable hand-held gadget weighs only 3 ounces, is rugged and waterproof, and is well worth the weight if you're someone intrigued by the above questions and who wants to more fully document your trips. How useful is the Kestrel 4000, and what are the pros/cons of using it compared to a typical multi-function watch?

What’s Good

  • Lightweight and compact
  • Measures numerous environmental conditions
  • Easy user interface
  • Long battery life (uses two inexpensive AAA batteries)
  • Easy to record, upload, and graph data
  • Waterproof and durable
  • Fast equilibration

What’s Not So Good

  • No trekking pole attachment for use in camp
  • Data storage parameters are not user-selectable
  • No stopwatch function

Specifications

  Manufacturer

Nielsen-Kellerman, Inc.

  Year/Model

2006 Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker

  Weight

Measured weight 3.6 oz (102 g) with 2 AAA batteries, manufacturer specification 3.6 oz (102 g)

  Dimensions

5 in high x 1.75 in wide x 0.75 in thick (13 x 4.5 x 2 cm)

  Features

Measures wind speed, temperature, humidity, wind chill, heat index, dew point, wet bulb temperature, barometric pressure, altitude, and density altitude; displays minimum, maximum, and average for each parameter; displays graph for each parameter; backlit display; time and date; user customized screens to display selected measurements; flip-top impeller cover; automatically store up to 2,000 measurements, even when the unit is turned off; manually store measurements with the press of a button; exterior temperature, humidity, and pressure sensors for fast and accurate readings; upload, save, and graph measurements with data interface

  What’s Included

Instrument, wrist and neck lanyards, 2 AAA batteries, soft carry pouch, instruction manual

  MSRP

$329

  Options

USB Data Interface $109, serial Data Interface $79, USB cable $34, portable tripod $25, carry case $19

Performance

The Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker, as the name implies, is a handheld device. Its capabilities are remarkable, measuring and recording virtually any weather-related parameter one might want to know. Its capabilities go far beyond those of the average multi-sensor watch (though a typical multi-sensor watch has a digital compass, which the Kestrel 4000 lacks. The new Kestrel 4500 adds that feature, and more).

User Interface

The Kestrel has a simple and straightforward user interface (finally, a manufacturer gets it right!). Displayed text can be set in one of five languages (English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish). I won’t describe the navigation functions in detail (essentially re-writing the user manual) but suffice it to say it’s easy to learn and very intuitive compared to a typical multi-function watch. Each screen tells the user what button to press to back up or go forward. The LCD screen itself is easy to read (crisp and high-contrast) and has a backlight button for night viewing.

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW - 2
The user interface on the Kestrel is simple and intuitive. The red power button is on the lower left. The upper left button manually stores data at any time. The upper right button illuminates the LCD screen. The center five buttons navigate through the various display screens. Overall, it’s simple and easy to learn and use.

Measurement screens can be hidden from normal navigation by setting them to “on” or “off” in setup mode. For example, if heat index is not of interest it can be de-selected so the instrument doesn’t cycle through it in navigation mode.

Measurements

Upon startup, the Kestrel 4000 displays the day, date, and time. It directly measures or calculates wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, wind chill, heat index, dew point, wet bulb temperature, barometric pressure, altitude, and density altitude (other models different sets of parameters). For each parameter it will display the minimum, maximum, and average. It will also graph each parameter within a user-selected range.

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW - 3
The Kestrel 4000 has three screens for each parameter: current condition (center), graph of recent conditions (left), and min-avg-max (right). On the graph screen (left), the user can access recent data for each parameter, for example the temperature was 40 °F on Mar 27 at 4:25 AM.

In addition, the Kestrel has three user screens, and each can be set to display three parameters at once. Charts and min-max-avg are not available for the user screens.

Sensors

The Kestrel is a scientific instrument. Documentation and data are provided on the type of sensors used and their accuracy. The temperature and humidity sensors are exposed to the air in an opening at the top of the instrument (see top-detail photos) to enable a faster response to changes. The pressure sensor is on the backside of the instrument. The impeller for wind speed measurements is protected by a swivel plastic cover to protect it when not being used. It has a precision axle and sapphire bearings for enhanced sensitivity.

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW - 4
To speed up the response time, the temperature and humidity sensors (left side) are located in an opening that exposes them directly to the air. The wind sensor (top right) is enclosed by a flip-open plastic cover to ward off dust and impacts when not in use.

Temperature and humidity response time is less than a minute-it helps to wave the instrument in the air to speed up the equilibration. The wind speed impeller will measure breezes as little as 0.8 mile per hour to hurricanes up to 135 miles per hour. Temperature accuracy is plus or minus 1.8 °F; humidity and wind speed accuracy is plus or minus 3%.

The Kestrel 4000 is completely waterproof, so can be used in weather of all kinds (as you’d hope a weather instrument would be). You can even dunk it in a stream to measure the water temperature or stick it into a snowbank to determine snow temperature.

Barometric Pressure and Altitude Adjustment

Since these parameters constantly change, the Kestrel must be set to a known value before it can deliver accurate measurements in the field. The best way to calibrate it before a trip is to visit a weather website and determine the current barometric pressure for your present location. It is easy to adjust the current barometric pressure and altitude on the Kestrel, and it’s noteworthy that you only have to know ONE of the values in order to calibrate the Kestrel so it will show accurate readings for BOTH barometric pressure and elevation. This is much easier than any multi-sensor watch I have used!

Since a barometric altimeter bases changes in altitude readings on changes in barometric pressure, accuracy depends on how steady the barometric pressure is. I found the Kestrel’s altimeter works very well, consistently providing readings within 50 feet of the actual value on the same day of calibration. In the field, a topographic map can be used to check and reset the altitude as needed. Specific surveyed pass, peak and lake elevations are very helpful in this regard.

Battery Life

Two AAA batteries power the Kestrel 4000, and the opening screen lists the battery life remaining. I used the Kestrel for five months, with intensive use of the data storage function, and still had 85% of the battery life left. Suffice it to say that a pair of batteries will last a long time!

Data Storage

A unique feature of the Kestrel 4000 series is data storage to memory for later retrieval. It stores 480 data points for each parameter. For example, if you set the record rate interval to 20 minutes, you can store 28 days of uninterrupted data.

There are two ways to store data. The first is to push the Manual Memory button to store data instantaneously, for example, for a specific location or weather condition. The second method is to switch the Auto Store function “on.” The Kestrel will then store data at the set interval until it is switched off, or the memory becomes full. The Kestrel does not display memory use status, but it does have a user-selectable overwrite mode that enables data recording to continue (if desired) by discarding the oldest data.

Data Retrieval

The Kestrel Interface is required to upload stored data from a Kestrel 4000 series Weather Tracker to a computer. Doing so enables permanent data storage, in-depth analysis and charting. The interface and data cable are available for either a serial or USB port connection. It uses an optical reader that aligns with two transmission ports on the back of the instrument. The communication software included with the interface is easy to install and use.

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW - 5
Kestrel 4000 mounted on the Kestrel Interface. The data uploading process is simple and fast: turn the Kestrel on, put it on the interface, open the communication software, click on “communicate,” upload the data, and save it to a specified file. It’s very simple and fast. The data log can be cleared through the interface or manually, on the instrument itself.

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW - 6
Sample data set uploaded from the Kestrel 4000. Data storage parameters are not user-selectable; the Kestrel records data for all parameters. Data are saved to a *.csv file (comma deliminated text file) that is easily imported into Microsoft Excel for management and graphing. The software also allows you to save remarks about the data in a *.rem file.

Utility

I found the Kestrel 4000 and its data storage function invaluable when field-testing outdoor gear. In the field I can read the actual temperature, wind speed, etc. any time I need to. Armed with the Kestrel, it’s also fun to challenge my hiking companions to “guesstimate” the wind speed and find out who’s closest. We do the same for air temperature, water temperature, snow temperature, surface temperature, the overnight low temperature, etc. Fun!

To evaluate the environment inside a shelter at night, I routinely suspend the Kestrel from the ceiling and record conditions. The temperature, humidity, and dew point measurements are most relevant for this purpose. At home I upload the data, graph it in Microsoft Excel, and evaluate the data in relation to my notes on the weather conditions, observed condensation, amount of venting, etc.

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW - 7
(Left) The Kestrel 4000 suspended from the ceiling of an igloo to record interior conditions. (Right) Measuring wind speed with the Kestrel.

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW - 8
An example of graphed data taken with the Kestrel 4000. The Kestrel was set to record data at 10-minute intervals overnight in an 11-foot diameter igloo. The data show interior humidity (purple line) was high when the igloo was occupied between 5:30 PM and 9:50 AM. The inside temperature (blue line) reached the dew point (yellow line) about 9:30 PM, at which time condensation formed on the interior walls. The outside temperature (orange line) was recorded using a separate device and added to the graph.

A remote temperature sensor accessory for the Kestrel (which will hopefully be available at some point) would enable it to be used to simultaneously record temperatures inside and outside (or at any two remote locations). In the above graph, for example, it would have been very handy to place a remote temperature sensor outside the igloo and transmit data to the Kestrel, rather than using a separate device and merging the data. An immersible remote thermometer might even help in the mountain kitchen.

Assessment

The Kestrel 4000 is a superb instrument for measuring field environmental conditions. It is lightweight (for such a complete and sophisticated device), rugged, waterproof, easy to use and accurate. Importantly, it stores data for later in-depth analysis or charting. For the more technically inclined backpacker, this 3-ounce powerhouse provides loads of useful information.

Compared to most multi-function watches, the Kestrel 4000 has the following advantages:

  • It has additional functions (wind speed, wind chill, humidity, dew point, heat index, wet bulb temperature, density altitude)
  • The temperature reading is accurate (on a watch the temperature is influenced by the user’s body temperature)
  • The user interface is much simpler and easier to navigate
  • It records data, and uploads it to a computer

However, there are a few disadvantages:

  • It does not have chronometer (stopwatch), alarm, and digital compass functions
  • Its heavier, 3 ounces compared to about 2 to 2.5 ounces
  • It’s easier to lose (I recommend getting it with an orange case so it’s more visible)
  • It’s more expensive, $329 compared to $150-$200 for many multi-function watches

The new Suunto X6 ($329) multifunction watch is probably the closest comparison to the Kestrel 4000. It has a limited memory function to store lap times and an altitude profile. The number of features embedded into the X6 is remarkable, but one has to navigate through layer upon layer of menus to get to desired functions.

The Kestrel 4000 can be used with an optional portable vane mount to allow the unit to spin freely in the slightest of breezes and perform as a miniature weather station. In fact, it has served that purpose on expeditions. The new Kestrel 4500 would be a better choice for that application because it includes a digital compass that enables it to calculate crosswinds and headwinds/tailwinds (all in reference to a user-set direction or target).

Overall, the Kestrel 4000 (and other, less expensive Kestrel models) is especially suited to measuring environmental parameters related to outdoor sports, and is the prefect companion for the technical-minded backpacker. In many ways, the Kestrel 4000 is much more useful to a backpacker than a GPS. You may even want to drop a hint to your spouse to get you the Kestrel 4000 for your birthday or Christmas, instead of a GPS!

What’s Unique

The Kestrel 4000 provides more useful information and is easier to use than a multi-function watch, and will store data for uploading to a computer and charting.

Recommendations For Improvement

  • Add a stopwatch function, and perhaps an alarm clock and altitude alarm
  • Provide a Velcro strap so the Kestrel can be attached to a trekking pole in camp
  • Allow stored data parameters to be user-selectable
  • Offer a remote temperature sensor so temperature can be recorded in two (or more) locations at the same time

Citation

"Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW," by Will Rietveld. BackpackingLight.com (ISSN 1537-0364).
http://backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/kestrel_4000_pocket_weather_tracker_review.html, 2007-07-03 03:00:00-06.

Print

Reader Comments

You must login to post comments.

New Visitors: Create a new account
Username:
Password:
Remember my login info.

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW
Display Avatars
Sort By:
Benjamin Smith
(bugbomb) - F - M

Locale: South Texas
Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/03/2007 20:51:54 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW

Roleigh Martin
(marti124) - MLife

Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group
Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/03/2007 21:45:20 MDT Print View

I just got done researching the various pocket weather devices and for multiple reasons went with the Brunton ADC Pro which basegear.com now sells for $140. It is 2 oz and has a very super loud alarm clock, watch with backlight, storm alarm, forecast, etc. Much more easier to understand. The Kestrel 4500 or 4500T seems to be better for a professional weather forecaster who can make sense of raw data, but the ADC Pro is better for a layperson like me, who wants the bottom line forecast and also a storm alarm. It is also cheaper and lighter too and serves as a watch, alarm clock, and weather forecaster.

Roleigh Martin
(marti124) - MLife

Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group
Re: Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/04/2007 07:44:48 MDT Print View

Benjamin, I presume there was a typo in this sentence -- the word "not" should be ignored, correct?

"Charts and min-max-avg are not available for the user screens."

Will Rietveld
(WilliWabbit) - MLife

Locale: Southwest Colorado
Re: Re: Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/04/2007 08:50:37 MDT Print View

Hi Roleigh. Thanks for your comments. I am not personally familiar with the Brunton ADC Pro, but it sounds like a very useful instrument at a reasonable price.

The statement about the user screens is correct. They simply allow you to view 3 parameters at once to save a few steps, but do not provide access to expanded information. You have to go to an individual parameter (eg Temperature or Relative Humidity) to look at the expanded information (min-max-average, graphs).

You mention that the Kestrel is more for techie types, implying that it is more complex, but I disagree - its very simple and straightforward to operate and use. It provides most of the same information as a multi-function watch, and some information more relevant to backpackers, and is much easier to use.

Best,
Will

Michael Davis
(mad777) - F

Locale: South Florida
Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/04/2007 11:11:02 MDT Print View

Great review Will,

I have the Kestrel 3500 which esentially does the same measurements but does not have the memory/computer hook-up so data must be journaled by hand if that is desired. Of course it costs less and is lighter but otherwise looks similar. Here is the web page:
http://www.nkhome.com/ww/wwindex.html

Some would say, "Why pack that! It's not essential." True, but it is fun and a little fun in the woods, to me, is worth a couple of ounces. I do take notes about the weather in my journal, based on the facts from the Kestrel, not my misjudged impressions. From a practical standpoint, I observe the dew point vs. temperature and humidity and can predict what kind of condensation problems I will encounter.

But mostly, it's just a fun something of interest to play with on the trail. After all, backpacking is about keeping in touch with our environment and the Kestrel simply takes that concept to the next level. Of course, I got mine on ebay for a sweet price that allowed me to justify it. (Thank God for ebay)!

Mitchell Keil
(mitchellkeil) - F

Locale: Deep in the OC
Re: Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/04/2007 11:16:34 MDT Print View

Unless I missed something when I went to the Brunton Site to look at the ADC Pro, it appears not to be capable of keeping track of temperature changes in the same way as the Kestral does. It appears to be able to only provide the current temperature and does not appear to record temperature data points over time. Have I missed something here?

Roleigh Martin
(marti124) - MLife

Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group
Re: Re: Re: Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/04/2007 11:21:13 MDT Print View

Will, I had downloaded the user manuals for the Kestrel 4500 and 3500 and was thinking of getting the 3500 but then I found out about the ADC Pro. The home page for it is here: http://www.brunton.com/product.php?id=262 -- check out the lengthy user manual. What sold me on the ADC Pro was having a very loud alarm clock, the predictive weather forecast icons on the time page, and best of all a customizable storm alarm which (I have not spent the time to figure it all out yet) appears to be able to forecast a storm in a 3 hour window. As one hikes a mountain pass, one does not want to find out near the top one is in the midst of a lightening storm. I hike SEKI every summer and last year we had storms 8 out of 9 days and they came around early to late afternoon, knowing a 3 hour forecast and having an alarm sound off is something I prefer over something like the Kestrel that requires me to do my own forecasting. I just did not see much forecasting features in the units, only trend tracking up to the present (in the 3500 over 12 hours) or in the 4000/45000 over many days if so desired.

Can BPL ask Brunton for a review unit of the ADC Pro, it would be great to get a comparison review. The ADC Pro is also only 2 ounces (without the lanyard). That makes it very light too, and the ability to be a loud alarm clock and a watch with backlight is great too.

Roleigh Martin
(marti124) - MLife

Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group
Re: Re: Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/04/2007 11:27:08 MDT Print View

Mitchell, download the user manual. Here are some excerpts from the ADC Pro user manual:

Pressure History Graph

The ADC is equipped with a barometric
pressure memory function. It records the last
24 hours barometric pressure readings, and
it can display them by bar-graph.
In Barometer Mode, press the [set] button to
select the Pressure History Graph Display.
While in the Temperature History Graph
Display, the right most bar will start flashing.
The right most bar represents the current
temperature (0 hour), while the other bars
represent the pressure records of the last 24
hours. Each pressure record is taken at the
hour (i.e 12:00, 1:00 and 2:00 ... ).
To browse the pressure record at different
times, press the [set] button to scroll the
record backward (from the current record to
the -24 hour record) or press the [reset]
button to scroll the record forward (from the
-24 hour record to the current record).

Temperature History Graph

The ADC is equipped with a temperature
memory function. It records the last 24-hour
temperature and displays them by bar-graph.
In Temperature Mode, press the [set] button
to select the Temperature History Graph
Display.
While in the Temperature History Graph
Display setting, the right most bar will start
flashing.
The right most bar represents the current
temperature (0 hour). While the other bars
represent the temperature records of the last
24 hours. Each temperature record is taken
at the hour (i.e. 12:00, 1:00, 2:00 ...)
To browse the temperature record at
different times, press the [set] button to
select the record by backward scrolling or
[reset] button to select time by forward
scrolling (hold down the button to scroll the
setting at a faster pace).

Temperature History Graph






The ADC is equipped with a temperature
memory function. It records the last 24-hour
temperature and displays them by bar-graph.
In Temperature Mode, press the [set] button
to select the Temperature History Graph
Display.
While in the Temperature History Graph
Display setting, the right most bar will start
flashing.
The right most bar represents the current
temperature (0 hour). While the other bars
represent the temperature records of the last
24 hours. Each temperature record is taken
at the hour (i.e. 12:00, 1:00, 2:00 ...)
To browse the temperature record at
different times, press the [set] button to
select the record by backward scrolling or
[reset] button to select time by forward
scrolling (hold down the button to scroll the
setting at a faster pace).

Data Log Function




The ADC is equipped with a function to log
the sensor functional mode data. These
data are the current wind speed, ambient
temperature, barometric pressure, relative
humidity and the altitude at the current
location.
This data also includes the time and date
that the logging was taken.
The ADC can log data automatically (log a
data at a preset interval) or manually.
For logging data automatically, check the
'Automatic Data Log' section below. For
logging data manually, check the previous
'Manual Data Log'.
1) The log memory can log up to 256 records
and 1980 data.

Weather Forecast Symbol
What Does the Weather Forecast Symbol
indicate







The ADC includes a weather forecast function
that predicts the weather for the next 12 hours.
The ADC will display the forecasted weather
by the weather forecast symbol. There are five
kind of weather forecast symbols, they are the
Sunny, Partial Cloudy, Cloudy, Rainy and
Stormy.
A 'Sunny' symbol generally indicates
improving weather or sunny weather ahead.
A 'Partial Cloudy' symbol generally indicates
slightly cloudy weather ahead.
A 'Cloudy' symbol generally indicates
deteriorating weather or cloudy weather
ahead.
A 'Rainy' symbol generally indicates adverse
weather or rainy weather ahead.
A 'Stormy' symbol generally indicates stormy
weather ahead.

About Stormy Alarm
Storm Alarm Sound


If the 'stormy' weather forecast symbol
appears, the ADC starts beeping for about 30
seconds.
The ADC will NOT beep again unless another
'stormy' condition is predicted.

Woubeir (from Europe)
(Woubeir) - F - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/04/2007 12:19:16 MDT Print View

I bought an ADC Pro last year or 2 years ago. I chose it over one of the Kestrel models because of the alarm clock because I don't wear a seperate watch. Nice tool with a lot of functions but not always to operate (lots of functions and only 3 buttons).

Mark Verber
(verber) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: Re: Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/04/2007 13:04:57 MDT Print View

I also have the Burton Pro. As others have noted, it is a quite capable unit. There are only two things that I don't like about it. The first is with the minimal number of buttons, getting to the right function can be somewhat tricky. Normally I don't need to read a manual, but I did with the Burton. The second issue is that when logging is turned on, the unit gives a tiny "beep" when recording data. I haven't found a way to turn this off. I sleep very lightly, the beep sometimes wakes me up.

Random questions for Burton users. In theory it's waterproof and you can measure water flow. Has anyone done this?

Mitchell Keil
(mitchellkeil) - F

Locale: Deep in the OC
Re: Re: Re: Re: Kestrel 4000 Pocket Weather Tracker REVIEW on 07/05/2007 10:52:48 MDT Print View

Thanks Roliegh, I did not read the manual which as you indicate is on the site as a pdf file. The Pro appears to be a very capable unit and at a better price compared to the Kestral.I guess this or the Kestral is the next gear gadget I "need" to look at purchasing. I always wonder about overnight temperatures and weather conditions as I approach High Sierra passes.
Thanks Again!

Roleigh Martin
(marti124) - MLife

Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group
How long does the Brunton ADC Pro operate on 1 CR2032 Battery? on 07/08/2007 20:24:52 MDT Print View

I'm going on a 17 day hike with a brand new Brunton ADC Pro pocket weather meter. How long does the Brunton ADC Pro operate on 1 CR2032 Battery? I'm wondering how many if any spare batteries I need to bring along. Thanks!

Mark Verber
(verber) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: How long does the Brunton ADC Pro operate on 1 CR2032 Battery? on 07/08/2007 23:32:49 MDT Print View

I am sure that I have change the batteries twice since I got the unit in 2004. I do think it has been more than than, but it is possible that I have changed the batteries up to four times. Some somewhere between 6 months a 1.5 years / battery.

Woubeir (from Europe)
(Woubeir) - F - MLife
Re: How long does the Brunton ADC Pro operate on 1 CR2032 Battery? on 07/09/2007 03:08:53 MDT Print View

That should be about right.
I purchased one in 2005, had to change to a new battery after a couple of months and the new battery ran till may 2007.

Roleigh Martin
(marti124) - MLife

Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group
Re: Re: How long does the Brunton ADC Pro operate on 1 CR2032 Battery? on 07/09/2007 07:03:01 MDT Print View

In those couple of months, would you say it would be more than using it daily for 17 days?

Woubeir (from Europe)
(Woubeir) - F - MLife
Re: Re: How long does the Brunton ADC Pro operate on 1 CR2032 Battery? on 07/09/2007 07:34:12 MDT Print View

If you mean the couple of months between purchase and battery change, I would call this irrelevant since I bought the unit with the battery already installed. Who knows how long it had been lying there? Since the battery change, I've been on at least two 10-day trips, several 2 to 5 day trips and numerous daytrips and I had no problem with the battery.

Doug Evans
(DougEvans) - F
Kestrel Wins - IMO on 08/01/2007 08:23:26 MDT Print View

I have both the Brunton and the Kestrel - Kestrel wins, hands down. Better interface, more accurate, better battery life, easier to use. I've been able to test side by side. JMO -