Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review

The Exposure Lights Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx are rechargeable lights with excellent versatility for multi-sport pursuits. They can go from the bicycle to the backpack very easily, offering exceptional brightness, light weight, and a weatherproof design.

Hightly Recommended

Overall Rating: Highly Recommended

The Exposure Lights Joystick MaXx is an extremely bright 2.8 oz rechargeable light. It is highly versatile, working equally well for backpacking and bicycle touring. While the light will work for trips up to a week, the rechargeable batteries are a limiting factor for longer trips. Mounts are available for helmets or handlebars when biking, as is a headstrap for backpacking. For those that need a light that can go from the backpack to the bike, there is nothing this bright in this lightweight and compact of a package. At $249.99, the Joystick MaXx is a very expensive light, but if you find yourself on the bike as often as backpacking, it is an excellent investment in safety and versatility. Although not ideal for backpacking, the Enduro MaXx is a valuable addition to the Joystick MaXx for serious bike riding at night.

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by Doug Johnson |

Overview

The Exposure Lights Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx are rechargeable lights with excellent versatility for multi-sport pursuits. Used when cycling, the combination is bright enough for high speed technical mountain bike night riding, matching the output of many bicycle HID light systems.

On its own, the Joystick MaXx is a very powerful flashlight for backpacking or mountaineering trips up to a week. In addition, it is a versatile light that performs equally well for bike commuting or when used as a helmet light for multi-light night mountain biking.

Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review - 1
The Exposure Lights Joystick MaXx securely snaps into a helmet mount that screws into a helmet vent and is easily removable for non-cycling needs.

Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review - 2
The Exposure Lights Joystick MaXx weighs only 2.8 ounces, is water-resistant, and very durable.

Typically when backpacking, I've only considered flashlights that use replaceable batteries, but the Exposure Joystick MaXx has changed my mind about rechargeable lights in the backcountry. When compared to my favorite bright headlamp, the Princeton Tec Eos, the Exposure light weighs less, has a longer lasting battery, is rechargeable, and is insanely brighter; for comparison, the stock Princeton Tec EOS is 25 lumens on high while the Joystick MaXx has a whopping 240 lumens on the MaXx setting - that's nearly ten times brighter!

In the field, I typically used the Joystick MaXx on the lowest setting most of the time, giving me about 25 hours of consistent light. This is plenty for week-long trips and when used sparingly would last for an even longer trip. When some extra power is needed, the 240 lumens is extremely bright and helped several times when night hiking. A downside, however, is that there isn't a brightness low enough for low-light tasks, such as reading - I recommend carrying a smaller LED light for tasks such as this. The brightness of the Joystick MaXx is best when used for navigation or hiking at night.

Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review - 3
The one-ounce headstrap makes the Joystick MaXx a functional headlamp and is adjustable with Velcro.

A one-ounce headstrap turns the Joystick MaXx into a functional headlamp. It is a two-inch wide stretchy band with Velcro adjustability, and it holds the light securely at a usable angle. The angle is easily adjustable by repositioning the headstrap on your head. It also has a reflective rear logo for extra safety when walking or running near cars. While the headstrap adds a great deal of versatility to the light, it is overbuilt compared to other headlamp straps; I think it's easily possible to lighten up this piece.

Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review - 4
Comparison: a modified Princeton Tec Eos (left- using a much brighter than stock Seoul LED) casts a very weak beam when compared to the Joystick MaXx (right).

For bicycle use, Joystick MaXx comes with mounts for both the handlebars and the helmet. Both attach very easily and the tiny light clips in securely. Even when taking hard crashes, the Joystick never came out of the helmet mount. For those that enjoy both cycling and backpacking, the Joystick MaXx can easily cross between both worlds - especially useful when bicycle touring or adventure racing.

Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review - 5
Both Exposure Lights have three output settings - MaXx (left), Ride (middle), and Low (right) in addition to a flashing setting.

Both Exposure Lights have three output settings as well as a flashing setting. I found the manufacturer claim of three hours (MaXx setting), ten hours (Ride setting), and twenty-four hours (Low setting) to be a bit conservative; I managed to get between thirty and sixty minutes more in the MaXx setting and one to two hours more in the Low setting. Both lights are regulated and have a "reserve fuel tank" feature that automatically turns the lights to Low when the battery has only 5% remaining. At this point the light will dim gradually over a three-hour period, giving you an extra chance to get home or set up camp. I found it comforting to know that if I pushed the light too far, that there was always a bit extra to get me to camp or the car.

Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review - 6
The Enduro MaXx has exactly three times the brightness of the Joystick MaXx but almost identical battery life, making the two an excellent pair for cycling.

While not my first choice for backpacking, the Enduro MaXx is a fantastic partner to the Joystick MaXx for technical night mountain biking. With the Joystick MaXx on the helmet and the Enduro MaXx on the handlebars, you have a veritable flood of light from the bar and additional lighting that goes wherever your eyes go. The combination is incredible when riding through dense woods, enabling speeds that nearly reach a daytime pace. The Enduro MaXx attaches to the bike handlebar with a quick release that is quite secure, but allows the light to be removed with a quick pull of the red release knob.

Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review - 7
Combined, the Exposure MaXx and Joystick MaXx make create a lightweight, no-cable system that is excellent for night cycling.

While most lights with similar brightness require cables that connect to batteries attached elsewhere on the bike, all Exposure Lights have the batteries fully contained in the light. The result is not only simple, but extremely lightweight - 11.2 ounces for the whole package.

Specifications

Year/Model 2008 Exposure Lights Joystick MaXx
Features CNC machined alloy weatherproof case, cable-free design, single Seoul LED emitter with collimated lens, "Dual Beam Optics" combination flood/spot pattern, light level indicator, "fuel gauge" battery life indicator, "reserve fuel tank"
Included Light with integrated Lithium Ion battery, smart charger, helmet mount
Modes Three brightness levels, one flash mode
Run Time 3.5 to 25 hrs measured (3 to 24 hrs claimed)
Output 240 lumens on highest MaXx setting
Dimensions Cylinder is 1. in (25mm) wide, 4.1 in (104mm) long
Weight 2.8 oz (78 g), headstrap 1.0 oz (27 g), handlebar mount: 0.2 oz (7 g), helmet mount: 0.7 oz (21 g)
MSRP $249.99
Options - Headstrap $25 ($20 when purchased with a light), Piggyback batteries available- 1 cell: $69.99, 3 cell: $139.99
MaXx car charger: $34.99
Year/Model 2008 Exposure Lights Enduro MaXx
Features CNC machined alloy weatherproof case, cable free design, three Seoul LED emitters with collimated lenses, "Dual Beam Optics" combination flood/spot pattern, light level indicator, "fuel gauge" battery life indicator, "reserve fuel tank"
Modes Three brightness levels, one flash mode
Run Time 4 to 27 hrs measured (3 to 24 hrs claimed)
Included Light with integrated Lithium Ion battery, smart charger, Exposure universal handlebar quick release bracket
Output 720 lumens on highest MaXx setting
Dimensions Cylinder is 1.8 in (46mm) wide, 4.2 in (106mm) long
Weight-light 8.4 oz (237 g), quick release handlebar mount: 0.8 oz (23 g)
MSRP $449.99
Options Piggyback batteries available, 1 cell: $69.99, 3 cell: $139.99
MaXx car charger: $34.99


Citation

"Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review," by Doug Johnson. BackpackingLight.com (ISSN 1537-0364).
http://backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/joystick_enduro_maxx.html, 2008-12-16 00:00:00-07.

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Forum Index » Editor's Roundtable » Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review


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Addie Bedford
(addiebedford) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review on 12/16/2008 16:33:53 MST Print View

Companion forum thread to:

Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review

Kevin Sawchuk
(ksawchuk) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Northern California
Re: Exposure Lights - Joystick MaXx and Enduro MaXx Review on 12/17/2008 17:12:36 MST Print View

These are very expensive lights. The Fenix and Zebra lights are available at about 1/5th the price and have similar performance features including battery life, brightness levels and have the option to use rechargable CR123/18650 batteries. (You do need to get the batteries and charger separately which brings the price differential closer to 1/3rd.)

The Fenix P3D or Zebra H60 accompany me whenever I need a really bright light (up to 215 lumen) and work for backpacking and biking. The P1D has similar brightness but lower weight and lasts less long.

They don't come stock with bicycle options but the Zebra lights come as headlamps. Headlamp and bicycle options can be easily rigged with as simple an apparatus as a rubber band over the front and back of the light and over the handlebar or some easy elastic sewing.

These lights are amazingly bright at their highest settings. I've been able to hang a bear rope 50' in the air in the dark using one.

https://www.4sevens.com/
http://www.zebralight.com/index.php?main_page=index
http://www.fenixgear.com/store/dynamicIndex.asp