Forum Index » GEAR » Is there any benefit to non-stick titanium cookware and is there any danger?


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E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
Is there any benefit to non-stick titanium cookware and is there any danger? on 10/14/2007 14:25:38 MDT Print View

I’m redoing various systems to make them lighter, more functional and more efficient, and now turning attention to cook system. I was wondering - is there any benefit to non-stick titanium cookware, and is there any danger? It's easy to overheat titanium, and non-stick coatings can present hazards when overheated (so I've read and heard).

Thomas Knighton
(Tomcat1066) - F

Locale: Southwest GA
Re: Is there any benefit to non-stick titanium cookware and is there any danger? on 10/14/2007 17:11:05 MDT Print View

The primary reason for non-stick Ti cookware is to prevent sticking when you're actually cooking with the pot. If you're just boiling water, there is no real advantage that I know of. As for hazard prevention, I've heard that with aluminum, but not titanium.

Tom

Dave .
(Ramapo) - F
Give the non-stick a pass on 10/14/2007 17:36:54 MDT Print View

E.J., I know this is sort of irrational of me but I've never used non-stick pans (while camping or at home) since I learned what Teflon was first invented for: it was used to coat piping that transported radioactive material in the Manhattan Project.

It may have the lowest friction coefficient of any material known to man, but it has no business near my food. ;)

Another thing: I'm a public health researcher and I can't help but notice a bias in the research related to the health ramifications of using non-stick stuff. If the reserach was independent, then the conclusion tends to be that teflon is associated with health risk. If the research was funding by an organization, however tangentially related to the sales of Tefon products, then Teflon is safe.

Another thing: if you get a pet bird, vets instruct you to stop using teflon pans because, if you overheat them, they release toxic gas that is especially harmful to birds. Think canaries in the mine shaft.

And titanium, with its poor heat dispersal qualiteis, will definitely create hot spots that overheats the coating.

Scratched Teflon is especially risky, and it's tough to clean pans in the wild without scratching them.

It's just bad stuff dude. Life isn't convenient. Crud sticks to pans. Teflon kills. Play it safe. ;)

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
teflon on 10/14/2007 17:42:09 MDT Print View

Hi David,

That's exactly why I asked. I'm familiar with the possible dangers of teflon, and what's bad for small animals I believe is bad for the big ones. That's why we didn't use the set we had (that and the weight). However, I like to generally pose open questions without leading, and see what comes back from the community.

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Teflon / other nonstick on 10/14/2007 20:14:27 MDT Print View

If I recall correctly, Evernew uses ceramic instead of teflon. Don't know if there are risks w/ceramic.

Let me know if I'm mixed up!!!!

Dave .
(Ramapo) - F
Ceramic on 10/15/2007 06:51:07 MDT Print View

Hey, looks like you're right. This is the description of the Evernew pots from REI:

"Extra-thick silicon ceramic coating is superior, passing tests for heat, corrosion, frying and scratch-resistant hardness"

Still dubious though...

I mean, passing whose tests? Tests for what? Heat, corrosion, frying and scratch resistance,bot *not* health apparently.

Man, I'm paranoid.

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: Give the non-stick a pass on 10/15/2007 14:19:40 MDT Print View

A note of clarification: Teflon wasn't "invented," it was discovered when a 1938 refrigerant experiment went awry. It was patented in '41, and various applications followed, with the French developing its use with cookware in 1954.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Give the non-stick a pass on 10/15/2007 15:29:16 MDT Print View

> Teflon wasn't "invented," it was discovered when a 1938 refrigerant experiment went awry. It was patented in '41, and various applications followed, with the French developing its use with cookware in 1954.

And despite all the urban myths about terrible dangers encountered with Teflon coating on cookware, it remains a well-respected mainstream material widely available in both cookware and medical equipment (and others applications).

Yes, if you take Teflon up to a serious temperature it will decompose. You might also set your kitchen on fire.
Yes, a poorly run manufacturing process may create some problems, but the same applies to *many* other chemicals.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Or rather on 10/15/2007 15:32:55 MDT Print View

Use your gear for what it was designed for. Teflon is safe if you use the items for what they are created for.

Huffing Teflon fumes off of a jacked up stove in a sealed tent isn't one of them.

Normal use though isn't going to harm you!

Thomas Knighton
(Tomcat1066) - F

Locale: Southwest GA
Re: Or rather on 10/15/2007 17:17:05 MDT Print View

>Huffing Teflon fumes off of a jacked up stove in a sealed tent isn't one of them.

Great. Kill my plans for the weekend, why don't ya? ;)

Tom

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Re: Or rather on 10/15/2007 19:58:06 MDT Print View

I know! I was looking forward to testing the flammability of my tent by chain smoking in it and then eating a platter of smoked salmon, caviar and French cheeses in it to test whether bears would break into my tent.
There goes my weekend plans!

;-)