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DAS packability
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jon goldsmith
(jegsmith) - F
DAS packability on 10/13/2007 10:49:15 MDT Print View

Im thinking about getting a Patagonia DAS for some winter hiking. My only worry is the DAS wont pack down small enough to fit in my pack. How small does the DAS pack down?

Joshua Gilbert
(joshcgil2) - F

Locale: Seattle
RE: DAS packability on 10/13/2007 11:08:46 MDT Print View

Short answer: not very compressible

If you stuff it it packs down to about the same size as a summerweight synthetic sleeping bag. I stopped bringing the stuff sack as the jacket is very dense, and when compressed it forms a dense plug that doesn't conform well with the other items in my pack.

That said, when it's just jammed in the top of your pack, it works fine. You will be putting it on at rest stops throughout the day, so why bother with stuffing it.

How big/small is your pack and what else is going in there is the real question here.

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: RE: DAS packability on 10/13/2007 14:00:41 MDT Print View

def agree with this, all of that warmth comes at a price. But on a positive note it is worth it on a cold day when you stop for lunch.

this pick shows my jam2 and the only thing in it is my DAS
DAS in Jam2

But this is when it is all worth it
Das2

jon goldsmith
(jegsmith) - F
das sizing on 10/14/2007 00:00:09 MDT Print View

Ill probably be using a cilogear 45 or 65 liter pack. I guess there will be plenty of room for a das for 2-4 day trips. Im split over a combination of a thermawrap and an old version micropuff hoody and the das. The former option seems to be more versatile while the das is just simpler.

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: das sizing on 10/15/2007 05:40:41 MDT Print View

What kind of trip are you planning where you need two synthetic fill jkt's? In some cases I have done this where I needed more warmth while moving mostly involving long stretches of above treeline climbing in the winter. For this I will bring a Pata MicroPuff vest and the DAS. I always find this to be a great combo in the kind of cold where your snot freezes in your nose...

jon goldsmith
(jegsmith) - F
Das sizing on 10/15/2007 10:44:46 MDT Print View

The thermawrap is equivalent to a fleece while the micropuff hoody is about 10 oz lighter than the DAS. I figured they would be roughly the same warmth as a DAS because their combined weights are roughly the same as that of a DAS. I plan to spend some time in the high peaks region of the Adirondacks this winter and the whites hopefully in the future.

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: Das sizing on 10/15/2007 11:00:18 MDT Print View

Your system would probably work fine, but if you are planning on using the Thermawrap as a fleece (i.e. serious uphill walking) you will probably find yourself overheating pretty fast. Several thin layers of wool with a windshirt over the top does the trick for me. For most winter hikes/climbs I have an Ibex Outback Long sleeve as my base with a tighter fitting Ibex woolies long sleeve over that (the tighter shirt on the outside retains alot more warmth while allowing me to have the softer fabric next to my skin). Over that I will wear a Smartwool Shadow. Most of the time while moving even in very cold temps this will do the trick. If it is at all windy or colder still I will add an Ibex Icefall softshell. Lastly for above treeline adventures I will either add a Patagonia Houdini windshirt or a Specter hardshell depending on the weather. In worst case scenerio's I will take along a synthetic down vest for keeping warm while moving but hope I never have to use it. If I do need it, that is a pretty good sign to turn around and go home. That said, whenever I summit any of the Presidentials in the winter I am always glad I brought it along.

Michael Fogarty
(mfog1) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
07 Patagonia DAS parka for sale! on 11/26/2007 17:58:08 MST Print View

Don't know what size your looking for, but I'm selling a early 2007 model, XL Das parka,in black? I usually take a large, but bought it oversized in an XL to layer over. Parka is like new, $150.00 shipped

jon goldsmith
(jegsmith) - F
das sizing on 11/27/2007 21:33:54 MST Print View

I am still in the market for a DAS, but I think an XL would be too large. Im 6' 175 with a 40 inch chest. The XL would be way too large for me, correct?

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: das sizing on 11/28/2007 05:34:58 MST Print View

I am 6'4'' 197 lbs and use an XL. While it is roomy, I never have any issues throwing it on over all of my clothing.

Mike Clelland
(mikeclelland) - MLife

Locale: The Tetons (via Idaho)
DAS packability on 11/29/2007 09:07:49 MST Print View

Why do you want a DAS?

Are you in a wet place where rain is an issue? If not, there is no reason for the DAS.

I would recommend a DOWN coat. Lot's lighter per ounce. Way more compressable. Lots of beautiful down coats out there. GoLite makes a nice one:

http://www.golite.com/product/proddetail.aspx?p=AM1427&s=1

The DAS packs down like a pregnant watermelon. I am not a big fan.

Patagonia makes a synthetic PUFF hooded sweater, much lighter, almost as warm when it's layered UNDER a rain parka.

Christopher Plesko
(Pivvay) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: DAS packability on 11/29/2007 09:17:58 MST Print View

Mike has a good point. If you get a DAS, make sure you get it because you want a true belay jacket. Otherwise I'd take down any day for normal hiking. My Nunatak Skaha is sooo nice but not when I have to belay my wife or partner up something in the snow multiple times a day. That's when I bring the DAS

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: DAS packability on 11/29/2007 09:20:26 MST Print View

For me up in New England freezing rain can be a real issue. Plus for above treeline type trips the full coverage a jacket like the DAS provides is amazing. I agree though, if I was just headed out for a day of snowshoeing, it is abit of an overkill.

Christopher Plesko
(Pivvay) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Re: DAS packability on 11/29/2007 09:22:23 MST Print View

The hood is great no? I love it, helmet or not :)

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: Re: Re: DAS packability on 11/29/2007 10:28:27 MST Print View

It is like you are in a sleeping bag. There would be a full blown crazy winter storm and I would curl up in that jacket with a nice pair of mitts and my Wild Things EP pants and easily take a nice warm nap. Not that I have ever done that :)

jon goldsmith
(jegsmith) - F
choosing a das on 11/29/2007 13:49:19 MST Print View

To answer Mike's question, I'm interested in the DAS because I plan to do some multiday backpacking in the Adirondacks and plan on more winter mountaineering in the future. Down is great but the Northeast isn't exactly a cold and dry climate. I also plan to integrate the DAS and micropuff pants with a lighter weight down sleeping bag. Having some synthetic insulation in the system makes me a bit more comfortable.

Ernie Elkins
(EarthDweller)

Locale: North Carolina
Is a Das right for me? on 11/30/2007 09:03:18 MST Print View

The latest Das parka deal that Keith Hultman mentioned in the Gear Deals forum is about to tip me over the edge (if they're not sold out, of course). I've been wrestling over whether I actually need one, though, and today is the last day of the sale. Ultimately, of course, I'm the only one who can decide if the Das is right for my needs, but I would appreciate some feedback from those who use them regularly.

Here in the southeast, I'm not likely to face especially harsh conditions. On a typical winter trip at lower elevations (2,000 to 4,000 ft), I can expect daytime highs in the 40's and nighttime lows in the teens. I'm usually out for only two days at a time, so I can plan my trips around unusually harsh conditions (snowstorms, etc.). This winter, though, I would like to venture into our higher elevations (6,000+ ft), where temps are likely to be 10+ degrees cooler (20's/single digits) and the weather can be very unpredictable.

In general, I would use the Das during rest breaks, in the evening and morning around camp, and as a temp booster for my 15 degree synthetic sleeping bag. Would the Das be overkill for these kinds of conditions? I've wondered if I could make do by layering my Golite Coal jacket and Patagonia Micropuff vest, but I know from past experience that I get a bit chilly in the Coal in temps below the freezing mark. I'd rather be overprepared and carry more than to gamble with my safety. One last thing -- I don't use down, so I'm looking exclusively at synthetic options.

Christopher Plesko
(Pivvay) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Is a Das right for me? on 11/30/2007 09:12:19 MST Print View

Ernie,

Not to make your decision harder/easier but DAS's hold their value well if you want to get one on a "try it out" basis.

And if you want a heavier weight synth (no down, warmer than the Cocoon stuff) option, it's one of my favorites right now.

Jon Rhoderick
(hotrhoddudeguy) - F - M

Locale: New England
Re: Is a Das right for me? on 11/30/2007 09:53:34 MST Print View

If you want a yes or no answer I'd say get it, theres really nothing out there thats as light and as warm in a synthetic. Its a dream garment if you have any chance of fitting it in your pack

Ernie Elkins
(EarthDweller)

Locale: North Carolina
Re: Re: Is a Das right for me? on 11/30/2007 12:04:13 MST Print View

Thanks for your quick replies, guys. Your comments convinced me to go ahead and order one from the Patagonia Outlet in Dillon, MT. As you suggested, Christopher, if I decide that it's more insulation than I need I can always sell it.