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Umbrella for Tasmania hike?
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Nathaniel Frey
(walfyfrey) - F
Umbrella for Tasmania hike? on 10/09/2007 02:36:13 MDT Print View

I'll be hiking a 2 week trek in very rainy South Coast Track in Tasmania. Would bringing a light, durable, umbrella help out much on top of normal rain gear? I want to take lots of photos, nature closeups, so an umbrella helps out much for that even in light rain. But besides that, would it help out in a big way in heavy rain? I'm weighing the pros and cons, so to speak. I'm going as light as possible. Thanks!

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Umbrella for Tasmania hike? on 10/09/2007 03:56:29 MDT Print View

> I'll be hiking a 2 week trek in very rainy South Coast Track in Tasmania. Would bringing a light, durable, umbrella help out much
I've walked there. Frankly, I don't think the umbrella would survive the scrub very long. And since what we get down there is often 'wind-assisted rain', I doubt the umbrella would provide much shelter either.

For those who do not know the place: the south coast of Tasmania gets its weather in a direct, unimpeded, line from the antarctic.

Doug Johnson
(djohnson) - MLife

Locale: Washington State
Re: Re: Umbrella for Tasmania hike? on 10/09/2007 07:37:39 MDT Print View

Hmm...if the winds are typically gusty like Roger states, he's right that an umbrella might not be the best choice. If the rain tended to come down or you were on a trail slightly inland, an umbrella would be a great choice.

I almost always carry a brollie when I backpack along the Washington coast or in the rainforest, but when there are winds, they limit the usefulness of the umbrella a great deal.

Have a great trip- we'd love to see photos on the site when you get back!!!

Doug

Jim Buch
(Jim_Buch) - F
Umbrella on top of rain gear - yes on 10/10/2007 08:43:40 MDT Print View

For photography, you will find that the umbrella will indeed be useful as an addition to your raingear.

I have enjoyed some fine rain photography in the Appalachians this year. I used one of the lightweight commercial ones made for backpacking at about 9 ounces.

During the periods of high wind, it won't work so well for you, but it might work OK during some winds -- for photography purposes.

During my 3 months of hiking with umbrella and rain gear, I never once actually used my rain gear. But, there wasn't all that much rain during this recent drought condition in the southern Appalachian areas.

Nathaniel Frey
(walfyfrey) - F
Thanks! on 10/12/2007 00:19:43 MDT Print View

thanks for the very helpful tips! I just might take one on the hike.. I'll post some photos of it later...

Colin Briggs
(colinpbriggs) - F - MLife

Locale: Melbourne Australia
I've taken one on 10/12/2007 01:50:10 MDT Print View

I haven't walked the West Coast Track, but have done the Western Arthurs, The West Coast south from Strachan for 11 days and the Overland in Winter. I would take one. Make sure it has fibreglass spokes, as sooner or later it will get turned inside out by the wind. If you plan on taking photos you will definetly need it. The West of Tassie is like the south island of New Zealeand, the one thing you can be sure of it WILL rain and usually a lot!

Jim Buch
(Jim_Buch) - F
Caution on 10/15/2007 18:54:09 MDT Print View

One caution. It is easy for some stray drops of water to get on your camera.

You get caught up in the closeup shot, moving around and zooming and compensating exposure and framing.

Then you straighten back up and look at your camera, and there are a few drops of water here and there.

If your camera allows you to use a clear or skylight filter to cover the lens, there is probably nothing to worry about.

Well, periodically look at your camera to make sure it isn't wetter than you think it should be.

Jim

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Bad advice on 11/22/2007 01:20:11 MST Print View

"If your camera allows you to use a clear or skylight filter to cover the lens, there is probably nothing to worry about."
No. The lens is the only part of the camera that is designed to take some drops (IE the spray from a cleaning solution). A single drop of water on any other part of a non weatherized camera can enter the body and zap the circuit board and no guarantee will cover that.
I have experienced horizontal rain and sleet in the middle of summer in gentler areas than the Southern Track but not far from it. When Roger mentioned "wind assisted" rain I can assure you he did not mean a slightly annoying drizzle. But go ahead, use an umbrella, we all like comedic clips on U Tube. (make sure someone else is using a weatherproof camera for that)
Franco

Edited by Franco on 11/22/2007 01:23:52 MST.