Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter
The Pros and Cons of Backpacking Umbrellas
Display Avatars Sort By:
Brian Lewis
(brianle) - F

Locale: Pacific NW
Re: Backpack attatchment on 11/30/2007 13:00:26 MST Print View

Link to directions to attach an umbrella to a backpack:
http://postholer.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=131&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=umbrella

Not sure if this is the one you refer to, but it's something. I have no experience with this.

I did try a different approach once, haven't used it enough to make up my mind about it. I got a couple of small velcro bands, used those to attach the handle of my umbrella to a trekking pole (downside: I *still* end up with only one trekking pole, maybe a nice local stick would work instead ...).
Note that I don't use baskets on my poles.
Attach the pole so the point is up, handle down. Run the waistbelt of the backpack through the wrist strap on the pole. Tuck the pole/umbrella handle under the chest strap on your backpack. Try this at home, walk around a bit, decide if it would just drive you crazy or not ...

One issue, I think, with any hands-free solution is adjusting the angle of the umbrella relative to where the sun is coming from. Less of an issue when you're trying to block out rain, though here too it's a factor, especially with some of the smaller diameter U.L. umbrellas, like the montbell.
Keeping the direction and angle close to optimal is particularly challenging given that any hiking trail twists and turns, you're rarely walking in a straight line. Holding the umbrella in your hand, you adjust almost unconsciously.

For rain, I've gone to a poncho and don't carry an umbrella.


Brian Lewis

Brian Lewis
(brianle) - F

Locale: Pacific NW
Re: Backpack attatchment on 11/30/2007 16:06:45 MST Print View

Link to directions to attach an umbrella to a backpack:
http://postholer.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=131&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=umbrella

Not sure if this is the one you refer to, but it's something. I have no experience with this.

I did try a different approach once, haven't used it enough to make up my mind about it. I got a couple of small velcro bands, used those to attach the handle of my umbrella to a trekking pole (downside: I *still* end up with only one trekking pole, maybe a nice local stick would work instead ...).
Note that I don't use baskets on my poles.
Attach the pole so the point is up, handle down. Run the waistbelt of the backpack through the wrist strap on the pole. Tuck the pole/umbrella handle under the chest strap on your backpack. Try this at home, walk around a bit, decide if it would just drive you crazy or not ...

One issue, I think, with any hands-free solution is adjusting the angle of the umbrella relative to where the sun is coming from. Less of an issue when you're trying to block out rain, though here too it's a factor, especially with some of the smaller diameter U.L. umbrellas, like the montbell.
Keeping the direction and angle close to optimal is particularly challenging given that any hiking trail twists and turns, you're rarely walking in a straight line. Holding the umbrella in your hand, you adjust almost unconsciously.

For rain, I've gone to a poncho and don't carry an umbrella.


Brian Lewis

Jason Brinkman
(jbrinkmanboi) - MLife

Locale: Idaho
Re: The Pros and Cons of Backpacking Umbrellas on 11/30/2007 22:17:09 MST Print View

How is it that no one has suggested this idea yet?

UL Umbrella Hat

David Lewis
(davidlewis) - MLife

Locale: Nova Scotia, Canada
Useless on 12/03/2007 17:57:09 MST Print View

Where I live... on the east cost of Canada... rain is almost always wind driven and umbrellas are pretty much useless.

john Tier
(Peter_pan) - M

Locale: Co-Owner Jacks 'R' Better, LLC, VA
Umbrella hats on 12/03/2007 19:29:07 MST Print View

Actually these work quite well in forested areas.... Used one on a 650 mile section of the AT in the very wet 2003... Absolutely super in warm weather, as you get max ventilation.... Super coverage for eye glass wears, too.... very light at about 3-4 oz, depending on specific model.... They are available in solid colors and even camo....Hands free for hiking poles....Used it as a fly cover for food when preparing portions of meals... Used it as a bowl when dumping out my food bag, the item you want is always on the bottom... right?.... used it as a wind screen for my Ti giga peak canister stove...And it always caused a light moment when meeting others on the trail or walking into a shelter during a down pour...Still have one in the gear box...

Pan

Steve O
(HechoEnDetroit) - F

Locale: South Kak
Umbrellas for added tarp storm protection? on 12/03/2007 21:15:17 MST Print View

I recently read how an umbrella could be useful for shedding wind and rain from the front of an open tarp. Anyone have any experience with this?

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Compact umbrellas on 12/03/2007 22:48:11 MST Print View

I tried a GoLite umbrella and had no problem but for the length when stowed. An umbrella is great in camp as well as the trail, providing a wind break for your stove, shade, and a trip to the latrine when your rain gear is your shelter.

I replaced the GoLite with a Shedrain compact model that is just 7oz with the cover. It was no small feat to check on the weights on umbrellas-- like many items online, the weights aren't published. See http://www.shedrain.com/product_detail.php?fld_id=51&cy=c&c=11

Edited by dwambaugh on 12/03/2007 22:48:50 MST.

Joe Geib
(joegeib) - F

Locale: Delaware & Lehigh Valleys
love it on 12/04/2007 08:02:08 MST Print View

When we were sectioning the NJ AT, we used them for sun protection on the open ridgelines. When someone saw 4 of us coming their way, toting umbrellas, they dubbed us the "Mary Poppins Hiking Club". They broiled, we were comfortable - call me what you want.

Yes, you do need to be wary of the wind. However, I feel much more comfortable with the strength of my GoLite brolly compared to the compact dollar-store one I keep in the car. I feel like an ultra-light zealot when I use mine to walk across campus to class in the rain.

Mark Ferwerda
(mnferwerda) - MLife

Locale: Maryland
Re: Umbrellas for added tarp storm protection? on 12/04/2007 10:04:21 MST Print View

I have done this on nights when it was raining and quite windy. I set the height of the tarp low enough so that the umbrella, when open, covers most of the entrance (on the inside). I had to hold onto it when the wind really blew, but in most storms, the wind only lasts and hour or so and then calms down. Works well for me!

Steve O
(HechoEnDetroit) - F

Locale: South Kak
Re:Re: Umbrellas for added tarp storm protection? on 12/04/2007 12:15:54 MST Print View

I wonder if you could use a small cord and stake at the base of the handle to hold it during a storm? It seems like it would hold well as long as the umbrella meets with the tarp tightly and there isn't wind blowing from the back side within the tarp.

Joe Geib
(joegeib) - F

Locale: Delaware & Lehigh Valleys
leash mod? on 12/04/2007 12:19:15 MST Print View

Has anyone successfully drilled a leash into the handle of the older model (non-foam) handles of the GoLite brolly? This may work, and I'm interested.

john flanagan
(jackfl) - F

Locale: New England
Stake loop for Golite Umbrella on 12/04/2007 13:59:55 MST Print View

I drilled a hole thru the older style plastic handle without trouble. My intent was different, but you can very easily add a stake loop. The shaft does not go all the way to the base of the handle. I drilled 3/16" holes a little over 1/2" up from the bottom of the handle.

Another thought - if drilling isn't an option, just girth hitch a loop of p-cord around the shaft and use that. If there's trouble with slippage, use a prussik hitch instead.

Edited by jackfl on 12/04/2007 14:04:53 MST.

Steve O
(HechoEnDetroit) - F

Locale: South Kak
MultiUse Equipment: Umbrellas on 12/14/2007 02:15:38 MST Print View

I'm not sure how many of you collect rainwater for drinking but an umbrella can obviously help there.

Edited by HechoEnDetroit on 12/14/2007 02:17:37 MST.

JASON CUZZETTO
(cuzzettj) - MLife

Locale: NorCal - South Bay
The Pros and Cons of Backpacking Umbrellas on 12/14/2007 10:22:07 MST Print View

Another tip. I drilled a whole in the top peg of the umbrella and put a small cord through it. I have hung it from a tree and been able to keep the rain off of my stove for cooking. It is a lot faster than setting up a tarp.

gdinero senior
(gmoney) - F
Trekking Pole / Umbrella combo on 12/14/2007 16:01:36 MST Print View

The Birdiepal website featured a Komperdell trekking pole that had an integrated umbrella. I'm very interested in checking it out, and would love it if anyone who has tried it out shared their experience with us.

josh wagner
(StainlessSteel) - F
revived on 06/09/2009 21:25:05 MDT Print View

has anyone tried installing a trekking pole attachment onto the part of an umbrella that opens up, so taht one could simply attach their trekking pole to the umbrella?

Huzefa Siamwala
(huzefa) - M
Re: revived on 06/09/2009 22:00:24 MDT Print View

Hope this is what you are looking for:
http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=13739&nid=168552&print=1

josh wagner
(StainlessSteel) - F
yup on 06/10/2009 20:32:50 MDT Print View

thanks huz

William S.
(will4242) - F
Re: re: umbrellas on 06/28/2009 11:31:34 MDT Print View

As for rain and sun, it seems like the umbrella overlaps. the jobs of rain pants, rain coats, and a hat. Of, course in windy situations an umbrella won't do much good for protecting arms and legs (wet limbs don't bother me though), but here's my question: Can an umbrella replace these things adequately enough to keep you dry while setting up camp?
My issue is that I have experienced very little rain *knock on wood* since I mostly hike in California summer. Rain, when it does come is brief and not too windy. I've never set up camp in the rain but need to be prepared to do so. I'm going to buy a tent with a canopy type deal so as to be able to cook in the rain.
in the end the weight cut is: 12.3 oz raincoat + 6 oz rain pants vs. a 8oz umbrella.

Jason Elsworth
(jephoto) - M

Locale: New Zealand
Brollies on 06/28/2009 19:17:57 MDT Print View

A few years back I adapted a brolly as per Ray Jardine's instructions. I had some success with it in the New Zealand bush in rain and it was great (when covered with silver mylar) for providing shade for me and my kid when I was lugging him around in a baby carrier. I may well give it another try for day hikes where the extra weight of it doesn't bother me.