Forum Index » Editor's Roundtable » Bringing up the Rear: An Ultralighter Hikes across the Weminuche with a "Mixed" Group


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todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Great stuff! on 09/27/2007 08:09:52 MDT Print View

Ben,

Thanks for sharing your experiences! That was such a real, down-to-earth read.

I'm heading out to do the Foothills Trail in the Carolinas this weekend (my longest trip yet - IF my knee holds up) w/ a more "traditional" hiker than myself, and your interactions w/your Dad & brother have made me think - nice job!

Todd

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Great writing on 09/27/2007 08:36:47 MDT Print View

It was very funny :-)

Btw, I noticed you said the part about salt. A big reason you may not wanted to eat was the lack of salt and potassium. (And of being dehydrated as well). Altitude and hard days can add up where nothing looks good.
The freeze dried meals your brother ate are carbs and salt mainly, easy to eat and easy to digest. A small cup of soup works the same way.

I carry potato chips for this reason. If I have no appetite and not wanting to drink, I eat a bag of them. The potassium/sodium kick in them often perks me up in a couple minutes and I find myself hungry and wanting to drink. Food looks better, etc. Try it next trip! It works :-)
A meal of mashed potatoes works similar also!

dan willhite
(yutahay) - F

Locale: Southwest USA
Grub on 09/27/2007 08:51:17 MDT Print View

Loved your story. Wondered what little brother was eating?

Christopher Plesko
(Pivvay) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Great writing on 09/27/2007 10:25:53 MDT Print View

Yum, tato chips (and salty soup). I eat these smashed to bits on long rides/races to reset the sweet tooth. Delicious.

Benjamin Smith
(bugbomb) - F - M

Locale: South Texas
Re: Grub on 09/27/2007 16:30:23 MDT Print View

Sarah, thanks for the ideas! I was not dehydrated (chugging like a camel, in fact), but was definitely low on salt and potassium. I'll have to try potato chips, though corn chips sit better with me. After this experience, I'll be putting a lot more thought into food in the future. Or I may do what my brother did...

... which was to eat Mountain House or Backpacker's pantry meals every night. He had different ones, but the alfredo pasta and spaghetti were devoured with particular relish.

Will Rietveld
(WilliWabbit) - MLife

Locale: Southwest Colorado
Welcome to the Weminuche Monsoon Season! on 09/28/2007 07:05:26 MDT Print View

Hey Ben.

Great article. Lots of wit and insight.

The Weminuche is August is certainly an adventure, as you found out. I grined a lot while reading your article, because I have experienced it many times. Your description is very accurate. I commend you for staying with it and not bailing, and focusing on the adventure and cammaraderie instead of the misery at times. At the end of such a trip, that's what we remember the most, and you really hooked into that.

Best, Will.

Benjamin Smith
(bugbomb) - F - M

Locale: South Texas
Re: Welcome to the Weminuche Monsoon Season! on 09/29/2007 09:11:38 MDT Print View

You know what's REALLY weird? This is the sixth or seventh year we've backpacked in that part of Colorado in August, and it's the first time we've been rained on.

eric levine
(ericl) - F

Locale: Northern Colorado
Mixed group on 10/02/2007 23:56:27 MDT Print View

An enjoyable read. Probably everyone has friends/relatives who hike with "standard" gear. I kept thinking how some of my new gear would hold up, since I recently hiked in the Rawahs (N. Colorado cont. divide).

As for the author’s food and its weight – well, now I doubly won’t be tempted to try anything complex or heavy. The reader’s tip about salt at altitude may be a good one. I often munch on low fat corn chips on my tough hikes to good effect.

Q Smith
(neotech@ktc.com) - MLife

Locale: Texas Hill Country
Hey, I'm in San Antonio!! on 03/30/2012 09:13:53 MDT Print View

I was in Weminuche August 2011 with a buddy. We are both from San Antonio.

Thanks for the trip report. It helped me vividly remember our trip. Especially heavy rain, lightning, cold, and altitude change (our first night we were at 12,400 feet - a tad too much for me). More importantly, comraderie, closeness to nature, beauty, vistas. I think my food was better...

Q

Edited by neotech@ktc.com on 03/31/2012 09:17:31 MDT.