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Terry Hoover
(thoover1968) - M

Locale: Texas
"Light" weight backpack to carry 40-50 lbs on 08/12/2014 11:57:27 MDT Print View

Is there such a thing as a lightweight backpack that will carry 40-50 lbs? I am hoping to start backpacking with my four kids and will need to carry most of the food, cooking gear, and shelter. Also, when backpacking in the Big Bend (TX) or other dry areas we will need to carry a lot of water. By light weight, I'm thinking under 3 lbs.

Thanks.

Terry

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: "Light" weight backpack to carry 40-50 lbs on 08/12/2014 12:03:43 MDT Print View

UL packs are designed for UL loads, so why try? It's hard on the pack AND you. Get a more "medium" weight pack capable of carrying a load comfortably and try to put the lightest stuff you can in it. I'm talking 5-6 pounds pack weight.

Terry Hoover
(thoover1968) - M

Locale: Texas
Lighter pack on 08/12/2014 12:14:30 MDT Print View

Thanks Dale. Wasn't necessarily looking for UL, but lighter. Personally, my BW is a bit south of 20 lbs (so barely lightweight) with a ~ 2 lb pack but didn't want to throw 40 lbs at it. I do have a ~5 lb Alps pack that is 80L, so probably just need to stay with that until the boys can carry more of their load.

What's another pound or two when you talking north of 40 lbs total weight?

Terry

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Light Options on 08/12/2014 12:21:45 MDT Print View

I went through a similar search recently. Best options under 3 pounds would be the following

1. Seek Outside Paradox Unaweek - I have not personally used this one but people more knowledgeable then me swear by it. I'd get it with a durable fabric like VX42. I don't know what size or features you'd want but this would be my choice for a kids and desert pack. I think the ability to lash stuff onto the back (like a tired kids pack) would be great.

2. Exped Lighting 60 - This is one I've used a lot in Wyoming and with heavy water loads. It was my go too pack until I started packrafting and needed a bit more room. However I still consider it superior to the HMG Porter for weight bearing.

Exped has recently added some new packs as well. They are a bit heavier but they might be worth a look. Personally I think the Unaweep would be hard to beat.

Brendan Swihart
(brendans) - MLife

Locale: Fruita CO
Re: Light Options on 08/12/2014 12:24:04 MDT Print View

+1 unaweep

http://bedrockandparadox.com/2014/07/23/paradox-unaweep-the-category-killer/

Edited by brendans on 08/12/2014 12:24:43 MDT.

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Re Re Light Options on 08/12/2014 12:29:30 MDT Print View

Okay lets hold on a minute. The Unaweep is a big investment. If you already have a pack that can carry 40-50 pounds I might stick with it and do a couple trips first to make sure you know exactly how much room you need and what features you like. A couple extra pounds won't make a huge difference IF the pack fits. Eventually I think an Unaweep might be a good investment but think whether you need it NOW>

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Light Options on 08/12/2014 12:32:13 MDT Print View

You could take a look at the klymit motion 60 that recently came out. If you rove the inflatable frame sheet it's about 38 oz. also has an Al stay and has advertized for heavier loads. I have one and it would comfortably carry 40 lbs. but as dale said there isn't an ul pack that carries that kind of weight either comfortably or even in many cases without danger of shredding. Ayla catalyst would be a bit heavier but probably a bit tougher.

Edited by millonas on 08/12/2014 12:57:54 MDT.

Michael Gartman
(namtrag) - F

Locale: Flatlands of Virginia
osprey volt on 08/12/2014 12:36:21 MDT Print View

I believe the Osprey Volt 60 can carry that loand, and it weighs around 3 1/2 lbs.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: "Light" weight backpack to carry 40-50 lbs on 08/12/2014 13:03:27 MDT Print View

Dont sacrifice 0.5-1 lb for the sake of being able to carry those loads more comfortably

A better place to ask would be hunting pack/ mountaineering packs

Theres a few lighter one for those loads

;)

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: "Light" weight backpack to carry 40-50 lbs on 08/12/2014 13:08:48 MDT Print View

"Dont sacrifice 0.5-1 lb for the sake of being able to carry those loads more comfortably"

The original poster didn't state anything about comfort.

--B.G.--

Terry Hoover
(thoover1968) - M

Locale: Texas
Thank you on 08/12/2014 13:12:01 MDT Print View

Thanks for the great responses guys. The Catalyst and Volt seem to be getting me closer (and staying on budget). That said, I might be better off using my Alps for now and spending the same dollars on starting to lighten up my kids things allowing them to take on more of their load. Will probably still watch gear swap for the Catalyst and Volt...

Terry

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: Re: Re: "Light" weight backpack to carry 40-50 lbs on 08/12/2014 13:31:00 MDT Print View

The original poster didn't state anything about comfort.

Well if you are carrying 50+ lbs uncomfortably for any long period of time

I hope that yr a young straping man with a good back

Or have a good medical plan that coverers physio and chiropactor treatments

Or youve spend most of yr life as a sherpa and have adapted to it

;)

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Go old school on 08/12/2014 14:15:09 MDT Print View

For heavy hauling, esp on trail, the external frame pack still works well.

Considering the weight hauling ability, an older Kelty (D4 or similar) at just under four pounds is pretty light. New ext frames have weight bloat FWIW.


Another advantage of an external frame is that you can strap things on very easily. When doing "Daddy Duty", it seems that there are more pads, camp shoes and so on you have to haul. A lot more difficult with an internal frame pack.

Finally, there is the price factor. For families, $$$ can be a limiting factor. Many used sporting good stores ("Play It Again Sports" is popular here in Colorado for example), yard sales or even Craigs List will have these old warhorses dirt cheap. $25 is what a friend of mine paid for his.

So (relatively) light, the ability to haul weight comfortably and found used and inexpensive fairly easily. The old school solution, again esp for on-trail, may be a viable option for you.


Does it work in the real world?

My buddy, hauling weight on two family backpacking trips (and another friend who often does "Daddy Duty" on family backpacking trips) swear by them.

kelty

Mark Montag
(SanJuans) - M
Deuter Act Zero on 08/12/2014 14:23:35 MDT Print View

Hey Terry - good to hear your getting the kids out - keep them active with backpacking and the bright side is in a few years they can carry it all and give you your earned credit ;-).

I carry 40-50lbs for winter camp / mountaineering every year when needed - people do it all the time just not on this website. I would recommend the Deuter Act Zero 50+15 which weighs about 3.4-lbs - if you can find a 2010 60+10 model on E-bay or other used sources that pack weighs 3-lbs - totally adjustable with a very comfortable hip belt and shoulder harness for carrying that much weight. That is a top loading pack without extra pockets and compartments keeping the weight as low as possible but still providing a solid harness system for an easy ride.

Keep at it - have fun!!

Derrick White
(miku) - MLife

Locale: Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada
Why Compromise? on 08/12/2014 15:13:33 MDT Print View

Terry,

You can have light, comfort and load carrying capacity in one bag: the HMG Porter 4400. I carry 50-70lbs in mine regularly with no issues in either comfort or pack tolerance and integrity. It is bomber!

Search it and you will see many posts on its functionality.

Derrick

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Why compromise? on 08/12/2014 15:19:50 MDT Print View

$345.00


That may be a reason why some people have to compromise. :)

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Why compromise? on 08/12/2014 15:26:13 MDT Print View

That is pretty cheap for a high quality pack. Just don't eat out at Denny's a few times and voila.

Seriously though, for a do it all pack, that is a good price. I was going to mention the benefit of a lightweight Mchale pack but then that may require two months without Dennys...;)

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Re Re Why Compromise on 08/12/2014 15:42:14 MDT Print View

IMHO both the Lightning and the Unaweep are superior to the Porter. The Porter can carry 40-50 pounds but I don't feel the hipbelt transfers weight as well.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Re Re Why Compromise on 08/12/2014 16:20:24 MDT Print View

For 2014, the hipbelt was revised. Extra 2" in length, slightly thicker and slightly wider.

So you have tried the Unaweep?

John Harper
(johnnyh88) - M

Locale: The SouthWest
Re: Re: Re Re Why Compromise on 08/12/2014 16:45:07 MDT Print View

My HMG 4400 SW is from early 2013. It carries pretty well, but I'd say 35-40 lbs is the most I'd want to use it all day for, maybe 45 lbs if just a few miles. I have not tried a 2014 model so maybe they carry better with the framesheet addition.

Also, I emailed HMG. They said the padding in the new hipbelts on the 4400s is the same thickness it has always been (unchanged since inception).