The best clothing combinations for backpacking or hiking?
Display Avatars Sort By:
Jaiden .
(jaiden) - F
Re: shadow hoody? on 09/12/2007 07:50:24 MDT Print View

Smartwool, Merino.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
where to find Shadow Hoody on 09/12/2007 08:45:24 MDT Print View

Brett, Jaiden,
Ah, yes. I thought they stopped making the Shadow Hoody. I was looking for it a while back but it was out of production, and it doesn't show on their website. Where can you get it now? And is it unisex, or is there also a women's version?

Eric Noble
(ericnoble) - MLife

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: shadow hoody? on 09/12/2007 09:08:05 MDT Print View

Smartwool Shadow Hoody is made of merino wool. Check out the reader reviews, including mine.

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: where to find Shadow Hoody on 09/12/2007 09:27:11 MDT Print View

The last time I checked, 8/27/07, you could still have a Smartwool dealer order the now discontinued male version Smartwool hoody from the US Smartwool wholesale warehouse. The only color combination in the warehouse is Driftwood / Brick (very nice looking IMO). The following is the contact I used and had delivery within one week of my phone order.

BAP!
Chris Daniels
PO Box 772133
735 Oak St.
Steamboat Springs, Co 80487
970-879-7507
Chrisd@wearbap.com

Edited by richard295 on 09/12/2007 09:42:25 MDT.

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: R1, just couldn't justify it yet on 09/12/2007 09:38:42 MDT Print View

Brett - For the widest backpacking thermal comfort regulation, in cool to cold weather, a form fitting hoody base layer and windshirt is optimal. For a fleece based option, only a Power Dry or Power Stretch hoody works well for this application.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
thanks, Smartwool Shadow on 09/12/2007 10:27:15 MDT Print View

Thanks Richard
How does the Smartwool Shadow compare with a power dry or power stretch option with a balaclava hood? I remember it was supposed to be light, maybe 9-12 ounces.

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: thanks, Smartwool Shadow on 09/12/2007 11:09:17 MDT Print View

EJ - My size L is ~ 12.5 ounces and is very good looking. One the other hand, the hood and chin area are poorly cut and baggy for my XL sized head. It is about .045" loft versus .080" for the Power Dry R1 but only ~.5 oz lighter.

Roger B
(rogerb) - MLife

Locale: Here and there
Re: Re: R1, just couldn't justify it yet on 09/12/2007 11:12:01 MDT Print View

Richard a slightly different question does the windshirt also require a hood for optimal performance?

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: Re: R1, just couldn't justify it yet on 09/12/2007 11:32:35 MDT Print View

Roger - Yes. All of your skin, except for your head and neck have blood vessels that constrict when you are cold and dilate when you are warm to regulate your body temperature. In order to not vary the blood supply to your brain, the head and neck blood vessels always stay the same size.

When you are backpacking, you will need to frequently adjust your thermal insulation up or down to stay in thermal balance. This occurs as you change your MET level, the terrain changes, or the effective environmental temperature changes. A zippered and hooded base layer / windshirt combination best allows quick broad spectrum thermal neutrality. Of course if the quick part is not a requirement, more conventional clothing like gloves, balaclavas and hats can be used in place of hooded base layers and windshirts. These separate options normally have less thermo neutral granularity, weigh more, and take more time to remove from or put back in your pack.

Edited by richard295 on 09/12/2007 12:56:45 MDT.

Roger B
(rogerb) - MLife

Locale: Here and there
Hoody and windshirt on 09/12/2007 12:19:53 MDT Print View

Thanks Richard

I am one of those who has a smartwool hoody and a windshirt with a hood so I should take a closer look at my gear as I may not need to pack the balaclava or the possum fur hat under certain conditions.

I appreciate your work it is very comprehensive as well as informative, hopefully BPL will get you to write an article on MET, clo and SUL backpacking in the near future.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
Smartwool Hoody really a base layer replacement; Balaclava on 09/12/2007 13:16:26 MDT Print View

Richard, thanks again for the weight on the Smartwool Hoody. Given the lower warmth for the weight, it seems more like a replacement for a light to mid-layer long sleeve base layer, not a midlayer replacement.

Roger, I never leave my 2 oz. Hind Balaclava behind - it's made some miserable days very comfortable. It's amazing how much heat you lose through your head. This Balaclava is very thin power stretch and rolls or folds down very small.

Roger B
(rogerb) - MLife

Locale: Here and there
Re: Smartwool Hoody really a base layer replacement; Balaclava on 09/12/2007 13:24:38 MDT Print View

I would never leave my possum fur hat behind, but I may consider changing my smart wool hoody for a power stretch one.

Christopher Plesko
(Pivvay) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Re: Smartwool Hoody really a base layer replacement; Balaclava on 09/12/2007 15:25:30 MDT Print View

I've got the men's and women's smartwool hoodies. The women's is a better base layer if you can find one that fits you. That being said I wear my Shadow all the time on day trips but it wouldn't make the "expedition cut." That's why I've got an R1 on order. Got to see if it's better. Tight fitting hoods are a must to leave behind the balaclava.

Hooded base layer, hooded windshirt or rain jacket and hooded parka are my core upper body clothing items. I rarely bring more than that.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
Info from Cloudveil on their power stretch hoody on 09/12/2007 18:08:39 MDT Print View

OK, got the info on the Cloudveil Run Don't Walk power stretch hoody from Matt at Cloudveil. Seems like it's very close to the R1 except for the hood, which is not a snug fitting balaclava. Also looks like the Cloudveil body is not as long as the R1. The R1 Hoody offers better face coverage (chin, sides of cheeks and forehead). I'd guess the Cloudveil is a little more wind resistant than the Patagonia R1.

"I have most of the info you were looking for I hope this helps out.

1. The RDW hoodie has a low profile hood that should fit somewhat snug but it does not have a super technical fit.

2. Short of physically weighing a large hoodie, there is no information available. My best guess would be around 11-12oz.

3. The weight in oz/yrd2 is 6.8

4. We have a full selection of RDW gear at our Flagship store here in Jackson (307) 739-3930

Some of our dealers have not received the gear yet so it is best to call a few places in your area by going through the dealer locator on our website.

The specs of the RDW PowerStretch are:

88% poly 12% spandex

Surface is: Face – Smooth Jersey, back – Velour

MVTR (Moisture Vapor Transmission Rate) test: ASTM E96 = 596 g/m2/24hours

Shrinkage result after three times wash and dry at 120º F is 2% length and 4% width.

Hope this helps, thanks for supporting Cloudveil

Cheers,

Matt"

Bill B
(bill123) - MLife
Anyone need an R1 in small? on 09/12/2007 18:31:56 MDT Print View

I'm about to return 2 R1's, size small to Patagonia. They didn't fit. They still have the tags. Given the scarcity of R1's, I thought I'd offer them here before returning them. Retail price ($130)+ shipping. Paypal only. If there in no interest by Fri. I'll just return them.

Christopher Plesko
(Pivvay) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Anyone need an R1 in small? on 09/12/2007 22:40:32 MDT Print View

What size are you? I've been debating between a small and a medium.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
Vapour-Rise and DriClime warmth on 09/13/2007 13:45:06 MDT Print View

Hi Richard,

How do Rab Vapour-Rise garments and Marmot DriClime fair in your calculations? I've always thought the Rab Vapour-Rise jacket would be handy for cold winter use, but it must be less versatile by nature because the wind layer is part of the garment. How does it compare with other materials for warmth? The closest I've ever owned was a Marmot DriClime windshirt (which was a little lighter than the jacket below and which I got rid of once I got a separate wind shell).

http://www.rab.uk.com/products_vr_vrjacket.html

http://marmot.com/catalog/fall_2007/10/15/26/node/716

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Vapour-Rise and DriClime warmth on 09/13/2007 19:26:50 MDT Print View

EJ - I have a DriClime that I use for spring skiing. Warmth wise it is equivalent to a light windshirt with a Polartec 100 under it for insulation. As you pointed out, the main issue for backpacking is the lack of granularity. Secondarily, the nylon windbreaker is constructed using very durable but heavy large denier nylon.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
Rab Vapour-Rise on 09/13/2007 19:42:41 MDT Print View

Do you know if the Rab Vapour-Rise is much different than the DriClime? It's clearly heavier than the DriClime jacket, but the Driclime doesn't come with a hood. I've read very good things about it for winter use in this forum.

In Winter I typically replace my wind shell with a Patagonia Ready Mix softshell, which is light, incredibly breathable, durable and water- and wind-resistant.

Edited by mountainwalker on 09/13/2007 19:45:43 MDT.

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Re: shadow hoody? on 09/14/2007 08:37:21 MDT Print View

Mostly Merino hoody that Smartwool used to make... it's been discontinued for a while.

I got a 2007 Icebreaker Nomad (390gm/m2 Merino) at a steep discount. It seems rather nice, close fitting hood, thumb loops... but I can't say I would have purchased it if it had been full price.