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Seeking advice on emergency insulation for unplanned overnights
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Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Re: Blizzard bag worth the weight? on 06/20/2014 09:24:16 MDT Print View

I have both a used and new Blizzard bag if you have any questions about them.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Blizzard bag worth the weight? on 06/20/2014 09:30:12 MDT Print View

"I have both a used and new Blizzard bag if you have any questions about them."

How many times have you slept in it and what are your general impressions about its long term durability?

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Blizzard bag worth the weight? on 06/20/2014 11:06:57 MDT Print View

I slept in it once, I think its very durable.

Greg F
(GregF) - F

Locale: Canadian Rockies
Blizzard Bag on 06/21/2014 09:11:21 MDT Print View

It is very durable for one night.

It is much bulkier once opened so isnt that great as a cheap sul option. You can re vaccum seal it but make sure it is dry when you do other wise the mylar sticks and peels on the wet parts.

steven franchuk
(Surf)
Re: Seeking advice on emergency insulation for unplanned overnights on 06/22/2014 11:31:20 MDT Print View

I already carry silkweight wool thermals (top & bottom) in my emergency kit, and typically carry something like a Rab Xenon (summer) or EMS Down Ascent jacket (winter).

In my experience keeping as much skin as possible insulated is the key to staying warm. Add a rain jacket, rain pants, and medium weight fleece (or down) pants and a hat you would probably be good down to 30. It would also protect you from unexpected rain/cold weather. The rain gear blocks the wind and traps heat that has worked its way through the jacket and pants. A lot of heat is lost through the head and feet so a insulated hat is a must.

If you are new to hiking and want to work your way up to overnight hikes then you might want to get a good light weight down summer sleeping bag and add a tarp. Yes you will need a larger back pack and add about 2 lbs of weight. For a long day hike I frequently carry at least quart (2 lbs) of water. For me a 5 lb of weight would not slow me down on a long day hike. Later add a cook kit food,flash light, and foam pad for an overnight hike.

Basically this is a weight volume verses warmth issue. If you want to keep weight to an absolute minimum then some of the emergency bivys people have mentioned would work but you sacrifice warmth in the process. However if accept a little more weight you are up to a warm shelter system that many light weight overnight hikers use.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
tog and blizzard bag on 06/23/2014 20:32:41 MDT Print View

can someone shed light on TOG in relation to temperature/en rating? Their original bag is 14 oz and 8 TOG, their "light" is 9.9 oz and 6 TOG

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: tog and blizzard bag on 06/23/2014 21:15:23 MDT Print View

to repeat what I said above : )

"The Blizzard is rated at 8 tog = 0.8 RSI. From the Mammut document http://www.mammut.ch/images/Mammut_Sleep_well_pt1_E.pdf 0.8 RSI would give you a EN lower comfort limit of about 3 C = 38 F at 13.5 oz"

Owen McMurrey
(OwenM) - F - M

Locale: SE US
Re: Seeking advice on emergency insulation for unplanned overnights on 06/24/2014 03:02:21 MDT Print View

"Suggestions?"

You said you were pushing your mileage for a day, so...
I have a tendency to turn quick overnighters into long dayhikes, and long dayhikes with a late start into night hikes or overnighters. For those more ambitious dayhikes, I prefer to just pack for a minimalist overnight going in than think in terms of emergency gear.
No stove or extra clothing, but my shelter, pad, and quilt that will see me comfortably through a night in the 20s weigh <3.3lbs combined, and I'm not even "ultralight". My stuff for warm weather is about the same due to carrying the inner net for my shelter, but a lighter quilt.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
TOG on 06/24/2014 06:52:28 MDT Print View

thanks Jerry- missed the link :) , the "light" would then be ~ 48 degrees- looks like it would do the trick for most unexpected summer nights out