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Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: +1 Flex Skillet on 06/12/2014 20:44:19 MDT Print View

I just tested it and my flex skillet fits over my bear canister.

OMG.

This is a game changer.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Wally Mart One egg skillet on 06/12/2014 20:50:53 MDT Print View

Wally Mart has a CERAMIC coated small (5" inside dia.) frying pan that is better for non-stick than a similar Teflon coated pan that I used previously.

I ground the handle rivets down (from the outside) and removed the handle. My pot gripper works fine and does not remove he tough ceramic coating inside the skillet.

I also have a 10" Teflon coated camping skillet that used to have a folding handle that I've removed. It's great for group backpacking.

Both skillets are aluminum, natch.

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
Trangia... on 06/12/2014 21:23:39 MDT Print View

EJ:

I actually have a Trangia Set packed away in the gear vault. I just don't use alcohol stoves anymore. So, it got relegated to the gear closet with all my other alcohol setups. I went through a bunch of different alcohol setups along the way. Once I bought my Titan Kettle, I never had a good reason to take the Trangia out again.

The Trangia stove sets aren't the lightest. But, I remember it being very high quality. At least it seemed that way to me back when I was using mine. I'm not sure if it's still made in Europe these days or not. I had honestly forgotten I even had it. I haven't gone through my stove box since I switched to my Jetboil Ti.

I'll have to pull it out and give it another look too.

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
5" Wally World... on 06/12/2014 21:38:02 MDT Print View

Eric:

I just can't handle a 5" skillet. I'm not dedicated enough to the lightweight credo for that. I used one my brother had along that was about that size once. I was trying to cook trout for the two of us and it drove me crazy trying to cook in something so darn small.

The 9" is more my style. But, I'm willing to go with the 7" for the sake of keeping my pack weight this side of insanity. Funny how 2" can make such a big difference in a fry pan to me. But it does.

The other thing I haven't been able to make myself do to save weight is forego my Ti pot and boil my water in my skillet too. If I'm taking a skillet along, it's because I want some tasty meals on the Agenda. Whenever that's the case, only having one piece of cookware always seems to create an unreasonably long cooking session and/or results in having to give up on a craving for a hot drink, a second course, or something of the like. I put up with it when I'm humping my Jetboil. But, I don't do any real cooking in that anyway. I tried the fluxburn skillet with it and it burned everything I tried to cook in it.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Re: +1 Flex Skillet on 06/12/2014 21:43:37 MDT Print View

and now it's stuck....

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
+1 Flex Skillet on 06/12/2014 21:52:49 MDT Print View

"and now it's stuck...."

You're right. New game.

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
It's stuck.... on 06/12/2014 22:01:21 MDT Print View

ROTFLMAO

Thanks for sharing. I now won't be trying to fit mine over my Bear Can.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Tiny skillets... on 06/12/2014 23:58:42 MDT Print View

JJ,

Yeah it's darn small but for scrambled eggs and (thick) pancakes it's OK.

Like most of us "skillet packers" I only take it for times when I know I'll do scrambled eggs or flapjacks. Sure, it only weighs 4 oz. (exactly) but to a ULer that's almost blasphemy. The rest of my cook kit (3 cup pot & lid, small plastic bowl, & plastic cup) weighs 5.2 oz. so 4 oz. is, relatively, a lot.

And then there's the 0.8 oz. mini spatula as well.
And the honey or maple syrup or jelly in a refillable tube.

But boy do those eggs and pancakes taste SOOOO good!

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Tiny skillets... on 06/13/2014 00:40:32 MDT Print View

imo, not carry 4 oz and forgoing flapjacks is "stupid light".

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
The pancakes and eggs..... on 06/13/2014 07:21:23 MDT Print View

I feel that way about cooking my trout. I've done it in foil sheets, many times. But, it never turns out as well that way as it does when I hump the extra weight of a skillet, my "super secret recipe" breading mix, and some olive oil.

Well, except for that one time I tried to cook it in the Fluxburn Skillet... Blech!

If the Flex Skillet works out, all manner of tasty things become possible again. But, I'm that guy that doesn't love a hot breakfast enough to wash the dishes before I hit the trail. It's an energy bar, or a couple of handfuls of trail mix, and I'm off....

Michael Gartman
(namtrag) - F

Locale: Flatlands of Virginia
our friend on 06/13/2014 08:51:50 MDT Print View

We hike with a retired Army officer. He said he went to the exchange one day, and they had teflon pans for $5.99. He bought an 8" and went home and cut off the handle. I have seen it in action, and it works great and it is very light. However, when he brings it, he has to use his MSR stove instead of his Jetboil.

He also uses a shedd spread country crock container as his UL bowl.

He says going light doesn't have to be expensive lol

Edited by namtrag on 06/13/2014 08:52:27 MDT.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
The pancakes and eggs on 06/13/2014 09:00:07 MDT Print View

Not many of us do pancackes out on the trail. In my early days, that was part of my breakfast for week long trips, cooking over a tiny fire too. Only on weekends now, plus, there are no trout to fry anymore. :(
Duane

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
Blasphemy... on 06/13/2014 09:22:47 MDT Print View

If you aren't getting enough trout anymore, you need to pack your bag and get your rear up to the high mountain lakes ASAP.

I firmly believe that many of the world's ills are the direct result of "fresh alpine lake trout deficiency syndrome".

That first bite of fresh trout every year is heaven for me.

Sumi Wada
(DetroitTigerFan) - F

Locale: Ann Arbor
Re: Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail? on 06/13/2014 09:40:55 MDT Print View

I have the Trangia frypan from their "25 UL HA" (UL hard-anodized) series. Not as non-stick as the coated ones but much more durable and much easier to cook on than titanium. I think the specs say less than 3oz but mine weighs a little over 3oz in reality. Wide enough to be a real frypan (as opposed to the ones that are lids posing as frypans.)

One important rule about frypans and sticking. Get it hot *first*, then add oil/butter, and when that's hot, your food.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Blasphemy on 06/13/2014 11:54:05 MDT Print View

JJ, I'm supposed to do part of the SHR in July with a few guys I've never met. Not sure we'll be by lakes/streams to fish at night. I was in the Recesses canyons a couple years ago, caught my share of trout and a few Goldens. Saving weight, no fry pan, nor did I keep any if I recall even to boil with ramen. Shame on me.
Duane

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
I hope I don't catch a lot of crap for admitting this... on 06/13/2014 12:10:35 MDT Print View

We have a very laid back schedule on our fall trip every year. Since we have 10 days in the mountains, we never do more than 15 miles in a day and take two zero days to do nothing but relax, day hike, and catch/eat trout.

With the prices they get for non-resident fishing licenses these days, I would feel fleeced if I didn't get to chow down on a few of those tasty morsels.

My boys love the off trail exploring and fishing more than the trail hiking and I find myself enjoying the zero days more and more, as I get older.

Once of the reasons we head to Montana for this trip in most years is that, once we get in 20 or 30 miles from the TH, we rarely have any company either. It is sooooo peaceful and relaxing. I rotate between a few areas in The Bob and a half dozen of my favorite areas in the Beartooths, so it never gets old or repetitive.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
I hope I don't catch a lot of crap for admitting this... on 06/13/2014 14:05:13 MDT Print View

I'm 60, hoping to do the Bob and a few other areas out west here after I retire, maybe some sooner. Not many folks out here in Kalifornia come Oct., even in high use areas from summer.
Duane

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
Retirement... on 06/13/2014 14:41:50 MDT Print View

I have the PCT, the CT, and a couple weeks in the San Juans on my bucket list, for after retirement.

I grew up in North Dakota and spent many a week in the Montana Rockies as a Boy Scout and as the son of a addicted backpacker. I have an affinity for the less trampled areas up there and it just feels awkward to me to run into 20-30 people a day while I'm out on a trail.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: I hope I don't catch a lot of crap for admitting this... on 06/13/2014 15:04:11 MDT Print View

That sounds like a perfect trip. Why work your butt off hiking when you can chill at a lake?

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
Trangia Pans... on 06/15/2014 02:49:32 MDT Print View

OK, So I was bored this weekend and hauled out all of my old stove gear to take a look. Turns out that the previous post about the Trangia Skillet was on point. The Trangia 27 skillet is a fine piece of gear, about the same 7" in diameter, and weighs less than the MSR Skillet. Except, that it would require me to take a pot lifter/holder of some kind. With the Trangia Pot Lifter, it weighs almost exactly the same as the MSR skillet.

I'm thinking that it might be the better choice though. Because, it doesn't have the handle that folds up into the skillet to block the inside of it. The MSR handle gets in the way of nesting other items inside of it. Anyone use their Trangia Skillet lately? How was its "non-stick" performance compared to the MSR offerings?

Just for giggles, I weighed the Trangia Kettle, while I had it out. It weighs almost exactly the same as my MSR Titan Kettle. For some reason, I had filed it away as "too heavy" to consider anymore. The Trangia Kit is heavy, compared to my other options. But, most of the weight is in the alcohol stove, dual pots, and windscreen assembly.

I'm going to stick with the MSR Titan for it's ability to nest my fuel canister and stove and to get the dual use as a cup/bowl. But, the pots and pans in the Trangia Kits are well made and much lighter than I recalled.

Edited by H2Oboy on 06/15/2014 02:51:45 MDT.