Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail?
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Matthew H
(vision-quest) - F - M

Locale: Portland, Oregon
Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail? on 06/12/2014 02:18:44 MDT Print View

So I have the Jetboil Fluxring frying pan currently, but everything really does get caked on there really good and is hard to get off.. especially eggs which I mainly use it for. Has anyone found a light frying pan that has a better non-stick coating?

Jesse Anderson
(jeepin05) - F

Locale: Land of Enchantment
Re: Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail? on 06/12/2014 07:19:45 MDT Print View

It's discontinued now, but my favorite has always been the MSR Blacklight fry pan. I've seen them around from time to time on places like STP. It's nice and light and simple. Never had an egg stick yet either.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail? on 06/12/2014 07:33:09 MDT Print View

I have this one (I did a bunch of research before I bought it) and the non-stick on that one is superb (11.4 oz):

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001LF3HZ8/ref=oh_details_o07_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The main problem is I have taken to using it in the kitchen for omelets and such so much I might have to get a second one. That is the one I'd take if cooking was the main priority - as may be the case when you are bringing eggs. :-)

I recently got this one because I wanted something to do non-poached fish on a long trip where the weight is more of an issue. I haven't tested it in the field yet, but a know there are other on here that use it (5.8 oz):

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00453MV78/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

That said, you do have to be very careful using non-stick pans on canister stoves since the heat can be very localized.

Edited by millonas on 06/12/2014 07:34:31 MDT.

Gary Dunckel
(Zia-Grill-Guy) - MLife

Locale: Boulder
re: Decent (best?) UL non-stick frying pan for the trail on 06/12/2014 08:21:33 MDT Print View

http://www.traildesigns.com/cookware/evernew-18cm-titanium-frying-pan-eca442

Jesse Anderson
(jeepin05) - F

Locale: Land of Enchantment
Re: re: Decent (best?) UL non-stick frying pan for the trail on 06/12/2014 08:34:01 MDT Print View

I would be a bit weary of a titanium Frying pan. Titanium isn't exactly known for it's excellent heat conducting abilities. I imagine you would end up with some very hot spots where the flame contacts the pan.

It looks like Marko's second option is the update to my favorite. It adds a handle but the overall shape is pretty similar.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: re: Decent (best?) UL non-stick frying pan for the trail on 06/12/2014 08:46:01 MDT Print View

"I would be a bit weary of a titanium Frying pan. "

I was going to suggest the same. I don't know for sure why the OP has an issue with sticking, but one guess would be the issue is exacerbated by local hot spots - the JetBoil heat exchanger ring seems like a bad idea for a fry pan. Titanium has this issue in spades. For a fry pan thin and light may not be the best idea, unless you are willing to be very careful.

D C
(OCDave)

Locale: Outdoors -MN
Eggs on 06/12/2014 08:51:12 MDT Print View

Perhaps you might consider revising your egg frying technique rather than replacing the pan. Even at home, eggs require a lot of fat and even heat to prevent sticking. Not to say you already have the perfect pan, just tossing out there that it is not always the tool's fault.

Good Luck

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
Frying pans on 06/12/2014 10:36:29 MDT Print View

I have to agree that the Jetboil Fluxring Pan is a HUGE fail. It has burned everything and anything that I have tried to cook in it. Even a big pool of olive oil didn't prevent it from thoroughly blackening my lake trout last year.

I was looking for the MSR Blacklite. I used to have one, before I started taking my Jetboil Ti on all of my trips. I think one of my sons ran off with it. While looking, I also found that the Blacklite was discontinued and ran into the MSR Quick Skillet.

I just ordered one to go with the new Kovea Spider Stove that I have on the way. I'm hoping this is the answer to being able to cook my favorite low flame dishes like omelets and lake trout again.

I have one of the Pinnacle skillets too. But, it's just too darned heavy to lug along on long trips where I'm already carrying extra food weight and a Bear Canister.

KEN LARSON
(KENLARSON) - MLife

Locale: Western Michigan
Frying Pan on 06/12/2014 10:51:08 MDT Print View

I believe a previous thread has delved into this subject some time ago so check it out. To summarize my thoughts:

I would highly recommend the 8" diameter ALPINE PAN that is 1 1/2" deep and weighs 7 oz. as I have use one for over 20 years. If you are into baking I would purchase the ALPINE PAN SET the weighing less than 12 oz. You cannot go wrong with this product even though it does NOT have a non-stick coating Some foods will stick (eggs and potatoes are sticky), but the surface of the pan is easily cleaned when this happens by scraping with a metal spatula, spoon or Scotch Brite scouring pad. Cleaning the pan thoroughly between uses will help prevent food from sticking. Banks Fry-Bake pans are designed to be used with metal cooking utensils, so use a metal spoon or spatula for cooking and serving.

GO HERE

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail? on 06/12/2014 11:12:02 MDT Print View

I have the msr flex skillet and it's perfect. It has a nice non stick coating and I don't need to oil it up to do pancakes.

Steve Meier
(smeier) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
+1 on the MSR Flex skillet on 06/12/2014 11:42:56 MDT Print View

+1 on the MSR Flex skillet.

I've used it to fry mountain trout and make tortilla pizza's. Completely non-stick and I believe 8 oz with a handle. Wish it had a lid but doesn't.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail? on 06/12/2014 11:48:38 MDT Print View

I gave up the MSR fry pan, as stuff still stuck to it. Not sure now it was totally the pans fault, too high heat will cause sticking also. I currently use a Trangia non-stick lid, purchased as a part from a small company in UT. My vintage MSR stoves still throw out too much heat, so I've burnt bacon and English muffins on it a few times now. Will not give up my vintage stoves, I'll have to try a diffuser, although on an old model 9 or G, it does not help. :(
Duane

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
Re: Re: Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail? on 06/12/2014 12:05:00 MDT Print View

I am stoked to hear that. It seems like I often have to buy 3 or 4 of these types of items to nail down the one that I eventually end up putting into my kit.

I really thought I was going to stick with the Jetboil Ti as my stove of choice. I haven't used an alcohol stove in years, I never went down Wood Burner Road, I hadn't found another canister stove that I liked, and all of my white gas and multi-stoves are just too darned heavy to carry anymore. Then again, there was a time when I thought that my Pocket Rocket was God's gift to backpacking.

Then I ran into a sale on the Kovea Spider Stove recently and am going to try it out this season to see if I can find some middle ground that still allows me to do more than just re-hydrate my meals. I really miss being able to turn down the flame and cook some of my favorite meals in the Backcountry.

So, long story short, I needed a skillet to go with my Ti pots and this new stove. I decided to begin with my tried and true MSR Titan Kettle for the pot, as it should fit the Spider and a 110 gram canister of fuel rather well. What are the dimensions of the Quick Skillet? I haven't received mine yet and am pondering how to pack my cook kit and what size Stuff Sack it will fit into, just in case I need to order one to fit it, before our July trip to Montana.

Edited by H2Oboy on 06/12/2014 12:07:06 MDT.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: +1 on the MSR Flex skillet on 06/12/2014 12:33:41 MDT Print View

It's actually under 7 oz with the handle. A real nice weight with plenty of diameter.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Re: Best UL non-stick frying pan for the trail? on 06/12/2014 12:36:29 MDT Print View

"What are the dimensions of the Quick Skillet? "

Just to be clear, the MSR Quick and MSD Flex are different skillets - though they look the same on the internet. The Quick (the one I originally linked) is the smaller one - 7.75 inches, 5.8 oz, while the Flex is the bigger one, 9 inches, 8 oz. Otherwise the same.

Edit: looks like I may be wrong I only have the Quick. Get some conflicting stats on the Flex online.

Edited by millonas on 06/12/2014 12:40:23 MDT.

James Klein
(jnklein21) - M

Locale: Southeast
imusa nonstick on 06/12/2014 13:01:01 MDT Print View

I use an imusa nonstick fry pan. Sourced from my local Kroger's. It just the right size for 1 (or 2 if you are using this in addition to a separate pot).

Its 4.3oz, 6"ID (at rim), 1" deep and maybe $5-10.

G H
(NotLight) - F

Locale: Midwest
+1 Flex Skillet on 06/12/2014 18:15:20 MDT Print View

+1 again on the MSR flex skillet.

* Has high sides for boiling water - you can one pot it using only the skillet.

* Fits over the lid of my old bear vault (but not my new ones, curiously).

* I've baked in it with just a little piece of foil underneath as a heat spreader.

* It really likes to have a lid, and/or a thin layer of water or oil at the bottom of the pan. These both help spread out the heat (yes, even a foil lid at the top helps spread the heat at the bottom).

Matthew H
(vision-quest) - F - M

Locale: Portland, Oregon
Perfect on 06/12/2014 18:49:23 MDT Print View

Thanks so much guys! You've been a big help. It's true the jetboil does have a pretty accentuated hotspot which doesn't help, but I've read so many troubles from people with the jetboil pan and it's got a pretty low rating every where I look. Looks like the MSR is the perfect replacement.

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
Thanks for all the comments... on 06/12/2014 20:15:13 MDT Print View

Besides the OP, you guys greatly eased my doubts too. Thanks for all the great feedback!

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
Anodized aluminum; Trangia pans are very light on 06/12/2014 20:23:49 MDT Print View

As you can see from the examples, you'll want pans that are hard anodized aluminum, which are much less sticky than titanium and conduct heat much better and more evenly. I haven't tried these Trangia pans, but they are super light (though probably dent easily and you need a pot lifter):

27 Series: Frypan 2.8 oz, 7.4" x 1.2"

25 Series Frypan 4.2 oz, 8.7" x 1.3"

Ken, the Alpine Fry Bake set also looks nice - they have a lightweight lid as an option which shaves an ounce and gets you down to 11 oz, though you can probably make an even lighter lid with ti foil.

Edited by mountainwalker on 06/12/2014 20:27:53 MDT.