Forum Index » GEAR » How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add?


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Alessandra Bisi
(AlexBambifluff) - M

Locale: Playa del Carmen, QR, Mexico
How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/21/2014 21:04:24 MDT Print View

I have found other threads about this topic, but not about this specifically.

How many F degrees of warmth do you think the jagbag silk sleeping liner and the MH Ghost whisperer down jacket (unhooded) can add to a sleeping bag for a cold sleeper female?
And how many more F degrees can I then regain adding a fleece jacket (mid or heavy weight) and thick socks to the first setup?
Should I consider an overbag?

Cheers.

Edit to add: fleece jacket and fleece pants

Edited by AlexBambifluff on 05/22/2014 11:47:42 MDT.

Andy F
(AndyF) - M
Re: How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/21/2014 23:06:41 MDT Print View

"jagbag silk sleeping liner and the MH Ghost whisperer down jacket (unhooded) can add to a sleeping bag"

I've never tried either, but I'd guess around +10F.

"how many more F degrees can I then regain adding a fleece jacket (mid or heavy weight) and thick socks to the first setup?"

+0F

The fleece jacket will likely be needed around legs to stay warm, and you'll need those wool socks on your feet for the same reason. Even with these, your legs and feet might be a little cold.

Edited by AndyF on 05/21/2014 23:07:49 MDT.

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/22/2014 11:52:48 MDT Print View

I tried one of those silk liners once. I got so tangled up in it that it took several minutes to get out of the sleeping bag every morning. After a couple days of that nonsense, I trashed the liner. I noticed no difference in warmth, even though the temperature the first night without the liner was colder.

As for the jacket, it depends on how warm it is.

I'd suggest insulated pants (fleece or synthetic batting or down), thick wool socks or down booties, gioves and a hood or balaclava in addition to the jacket. That's what a lot of folks on this and other backpacking forums recommend to extend the sleeping bag rating.

Edited by hikinggranny on 05/22/2014 11:54:01 MDT.

Alessandra Bisi
(AlexBambifluff) - M

Locale: Playa del Carmen, QR, Mexico
Re: How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/22/2014 12:08:01 MDT Print View

But my point is, how many F degrees can I extend the sleeping bag of, by wearing an 850 filled lightweight down jacket, a silk liner, fleece pants, thick socks, gloves and possibly a fleece jacket.

(Long underwear and hat are included in the EN comfort limit of the bag, so I'll be wearing those already and they shouldn't be considered in this parameter.)

Cheers.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/22/2014 12:18:24 MDT Print View

Like Mary, I found that a sleeping bag liner does not add any noticable warmth and was more trouble that it was worth.

The rest is pretty subjective but my experience...

Like Andy, I find that wearing a down puffy adds about 10*F warmth to my sleep system.

Adding a fleece jacket to the puffy along with fleece pants (I don't do this), you _might_ add 15* total.

Cameron Habib
(camhabib) - F
Re: Re: How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/22/2014 12:20:17 MDT Print View

The only way to answer this question is experience. Too many variables (void air volume, breathability, wind, humidity, weights, etc) to even begin to answer this question, even if it wasn't entirely a personal and subjective matter.

Seth Brewer
(Whistler) - MLife

Locale: www.peaksandvalleys.weebly.com
Perhaps 10 degreees on 05/22/2014 12:21:19 MDT Print View

The only way you will know is to go out and try sleeping outside. I use the Silva Forecaster 610 Compass/Thermometer for just that reason - 1/2 ounce and I can test out my gear at various known temperatures to judge how it will perform.

My silk liner gives about 5 degrees or so, and my Ghost Whisperer would be at least the same. So maybe 10-15 degrees for your torso, and 10 for your legs (Women are often coldest in the hands and feet - so thick socks and some liner gloves may help).

Alessandra Bisi
(AlexBambifluff) - M

Locale: Playa del Carmen, QR, Mexico
Re: Re: Re: How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/22/2014 12:32:21 MDT Print View

Cameron you are always so kind and helpful!

I can't go outside and try the set-up out, as I haven't got a tent yet and in Playa del Crimen there are currently 89F; therefore, sleeping with a liner and a down puffy is going to be slightly ridiculous.
I want to purchase the right temperature sleeping bag, so I want to do the maths correctly, in ordeer to see how many degrees F I can stretch the bag of, with layers.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Re: How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/22/2014 15:08:57 MDT Print View

Wearing all that you will extend your bag by about no degrees. You are a woman (women sleep much colder than men) and sleeping bag ratings are rarely accurate. You would probably need all of that clothing to stay warm at the bags listed temperature.
Depends on what bag you are using though, the high end ones have accurate ratings.
If you are camping at 5 degrees with a typical inaccurately rated bag you will want a -20 bag.

Sleeping bag liners don't add much warm, it's more efficient to put that weight into clothing.

Edited by justin_baker on 05/22/2014 15:09:59 MDT.

Randy Martin
(randalmartin) - F

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: Re: How many F degrees of warmth can a silk sleeping liner and a LW down puffy add? on 05/22/2014 15:40:17 MDT Print View

"Sleeping bag liners don't add much warm, it's more efficient to put that weight into clothing."

+1

Liners are primarily to help keep your bag cleaner, especially if you are wearing dirty clothes in your bag. So if you are bringing your liner for that purpose I suppose it's dual purpose.

Alessandra Bisi
(AlexBambifluff) - M

Locale: Playa del Carmen, QR, Mexico
And what about the EN ratings? on 05/22/2014 15:44:42 MDT Print View

But I guess the EN Comfort ratings are accurate, aren't they?!

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: And what about the EN ratings? on 05/22/2014 16:04:04 MDT Print View

It all depends on the person. I can sleep on one side in 20* bag snugged up and comfortable while my gf is on the other side warm in a 30* bag half unzipped.

This is where gear shake out hikes and personal experience comes into play. you can't learn everything on the internet.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: And what about the EN ratings? on 05/22/2014 16:24:51 MDT Print View

"But I guess the EN Comfort ratings are accurate, aren't they?!"

Yes, they provide a consistent answer for a wired, plastic, manikin.


If You are an "Average" woman, you'll probably do OK.
But you won't know that until you're out there for a couple of nights.

If you go to bed exhausted, hungry, dehydrated, on a thin pad, all bets are off.

Edited by greg23 on 05/22/2014 16:26:50 MDT.

Alessandra Bisi
(AlexBambifluff) - M

Locale: Playa del Carmen, QR, Mexico
which pad? on 05/22/2014 16:34:30 MDT Print View

So which pad should be doing the job then?

May be I should just bring a man with me, rather than a warm sleeping bag. :-P

Alessandra Bisi
(AlexBambifluff) - M

Locale: Playa del Carmen, QR, Mexico
Fleece liner? on 05/22/2014 17:50:30 MDT Print View

Would a fleece liner added make any difference? Or possibly an insulated one?

Edited by AlexBambifluff on 05/22/2014 17:55:07 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Fleece liner? on 05/22/2014 18:00:01 MDT Print View

"Would a fleece liner added make any difference?"

A fleece liner would make it warmer, but it is also likely to be very heavy, and it is a single-purpose item. One of the basic rules of ultralightweight backpacking is (whenever possible) an item should have multiple purposes.

Something more like a serape would be wearable and could also be used inside a sleeping bag. It is still likely to be heavy.

With this same purpose in mind, I sewed myself a 6-oz down blanket. I can use it for extra warmth inside the sleeping bag, or I can wrap it around my waist and fasten it with velcro tabs, and it can be worn as a warm layer.

--B.G.--

Alessandra Bisi
(AlexBambifluff) - M

Locale: Playa del Carmen, QR, Mexico
So, what do I do? on 05/22/2014 18:03:23 MDT Print View

How can I do this, then?
...Mumble mumble...

This is only 6x4inch and it weighs 9 ounces: http://www.rei.com/product/797113/sea-to-summit-reactor-plus-thermolite-compact-liner#specsTab

it doesn't look like such a bad option after all...

Edited by AlexBambifluff on 05/22/2014 18:36:54 MDT.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: So, what do I do? on 05/22/2014 19:28:06 MDT Print View

I realize that you're looking for a sleep system that will work in a wide range of conditions. I had an older version of the same thing and found I wasn't any warmer when I used it. They're advertising this as a new design but I suspect it's bull$%!+.

It's also 9oz. That's a hell of a lot of weight. If you were to add 9oz of down to your sleeping bag, you'd get 15* or more of warmth from it.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: So, what do I do? on 05/22/2014 19:33:24 MDT Print View

Alessandra, get a quilt that you can put over your sleeping bag if needed. That will be the most weight efficient way to boost your insulation.

Alessandra Bisi
(AlexBambifluff) - M

Locale: Playa del Carmen, QR, Mexico
$$$ on 05/22/2014 19:36:38 MDT Print View

A quilt will cost almost as a sleeping bag...I don't think I can spend that much tbh.