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Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Conspiracy and The Party Of No! on 05/05/2014 18:15:46 MDT Print View

round and round and round we go...round we go...round we go.....round and round and round we go....with no head attached



http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/scandal-envy-ugly-thing

Matthew Perry
(bigfoot2) - F

Locale: Oregon
Whatever, Ken....you're not the only one who can post garbage. on 05/05/2014 18:59:47 MDT Print View

“She just found out what Common Core is…”

cc

Edited by bigfoot2 on 05/05/2014 20:31:12 MDT.

Jennifer Mitol
(Jenmitol) - M

Locale: In my dreams....
Re: Whatever, Ken....you're not the only one who can post garbage. on 05/06/2014 11:34:48 MDT Print View

Ah, the scourge of the Common Core!

Heaven forbid we actually have some basic standards of knowledge so that the US can actually compete with the rest of the world. Oh the humanity!!!!

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re: Whatever, Ken....you're not the only one who can post garbage. on 05/06/2014 12:14:34 MDT Print View

I'm a teacher involved in the implementation/testing of common core on my high school campus. I have my own children testing under it as well.

I'd love to hear in your words what the problem is.

Matthew Perry
(bigfoot2) - F

Locale: Oregon
Common Core on 05/06/2014 14:45:28 MDT Print View

"I'm a teacher involved in the implementation/testing of common core on my high school campus. I have my own children testing under it as well.

I'd love to hear in your words what the problem is."

Here you go, in a nutshell...

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/373840/ten-dumbest-common-core-problems-alec-torres

http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/27_04/edit274.shtml

Under Common Core, students don’t learn standard algorithm – think traditional addition or subtraction – until fourth grade now. Prior to that, kids learn “regrouping.” Instead of stacking 17 on top of 32 and adding the ones column, then the tens column; students group 10 with 30 and 7 with 2 horizontally. Then they add 40 and 9 to come to the answer. Seriously? Yeah, we'll compete with the rest of the world alright...to be the first to the bottom of the list.
Basically it will teach kids to add 1 plus 1 and get the color 9 by way of smelling their crayons as a way of checking their work. As a pharmacist, i'm REALLY not looking forward to working with these kids in 10 or 15 years. Scary stuff. I am so glad my wife and I home schooled our kids! There's even more of a reason to do so nowadays.

Here's an example of a question on a test from a Common Core aligned textbook from Wisconsin that asked a middle schooler to find the pronoun in the following sentence:

"Rich people are too callous and greedy to realize they are destroying the middle class.”

WTF?? This is an actual question on an actual Common Core test! Go look it up. It's just one of many examples of the liberal indoctrination program disguised as standardized testing from around the country. No political bias there. Move on. Nothing to see. These aren't the droids you're looking for...


M

Edited by bigfoot2 on 05/06/2014 15:13:10 MDT.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Common Core on 05/06/2014 15:43:30 MDT Print View

"It's just one of many examples of the liberal indoctrination program disguised as standardized testing from around the country."

If that's the basic premise from which you're operating then there's nothing I can tell you to have a productive conversation.

Have a good one.

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Re: Common Core on 05/06/2014 17:25:56 MDT Print View

liberal indoctrination..... lol

what about conservative indoctrination...you know bible thumping, gun toting politics that our children see


goes both way....yeah liberalism is a disease...lol get a clue

Edited by kennyhel77 on 05/06/2014 17:28:09 MDT.

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Re: Re: Common Core on 05/06/2014 17:27:25 MDT Print View

So Craig, do you think teachers spew their political beliefs or values while teaching? I would be very interested in hearing this. My wife teaches HS and never, NEVER has she discused politics. If you hate the teaching machine so much, get into private schools or find a different profession...wow

Edited by kennyhel77 on 05/06/2014 17:30:31 MDT.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Re: Common Core on 05/06/2014 17:34:28 MDT Print View

"So Craig, do you think teachers spew their political beliefs or values while teaching? I would be very interested in hearing this. My wife teaches HS and never, NEVER has she discused politics. If you hate the teaching machine so much, get into private schools or find a different profession...wow"

Ken,

Do you realize that the first half of his response is a quote from Matt?

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Common Core on 05/06/2014 17:59:29 MDT Print View

My daughter came home regularly with political ideas from the teachers agenda, which in a way was fine because it allowed us to really discuss the issues, but I do think that depending where you live the kids are often indoctrinated one way or the other.
My daughter was in a class in high school that gave the kids an assignment that went like this:
Here are two types of stickers, one that says "you are good for the economy" and one that says "you are bad for the economy". Before Christmas they were to go downtown Santa Cruz and ask shoppers if they were spending equal or more than the previous year ( give them to good for the economy sticker...) or if they were spending less than the previous year ( give them the bad for the economy sticker). That is definitely a slanted view....


Edited for spelling.

Edited by Kat_P on 05/06/2014 18:01:19 MDT.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Teacher Bias on 05/06/2014 18:20:16 MDT Print View

Glad you're not jumping to conclusions too quickly Ken...

_____________________________

On the note of teacher bias, of course it happens. How couldn't it? Some teachers are terrible, some are balanced, others try to remain publicly neutral to a fault. In my experience, most teenagers appreciate getting to know who you actually are and what you think. I find it builds credibility and respect. It doesn't mean they all agree, nor that you force them to.

Believe it or not, mature, thoughtful teachers (and people) are capable of sharing and discussing their beliefs (even controversial ones) in a respectful way.

The beauty of public education lies in the numbers and demographics. An average pre-K thru 12 public school graduate has typically had 8 different teachers between pre-K and 6th grade, and then have as many as 6 teachers per year for the remaining 6 years. That's roughly 44 teachers by graduation. Odds are, they've been exposed to quite a few different belief systems, cultural perspectives, and political ideologies.

I'm completely at a loss as to how home schooling remedies the "bias in the classroom" idea; it simply ensures that the parents potentially have absolute control over which single bias they want to teach.

Edited by xnomanx on 05/06/2014 18:24:03 MDT.

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
Re: Teacher Bias on 05/06/2014 18:29:14 MDT Print View

Craig, that rings true. The only issue I can see is in areas that are very homogenous . You might be hard pressed to find a teacher with liberal ideas in some southern towns and vice versa in the Bay Area. But yes, more teachers, more ideas, more points of views have got to be a good thing.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re: Teacher Bias on 05/06/2014 18:47:08 MDT Print View

I personally connect with many, many students every year. My classroom is full on every break and at lunch, all of us just talking; life, school, politics, nonsense, philosophy...

I'm not trying to claim a Teach of the Year Award. Our campus is full of teachers that bond with students on a daily basis.

Obviously, students that gravitate to me connect with something about me. And other students go to other teachers.

Christian? Great. There's a Christian Bible study that meets every week. Sponsored by a teacher.

Muslim? You've got a place to go also. Sponsored by a teacher.

Left? Right? There's a club for whatever your affiliation is. We had an Anarchist club a year ago (though surprisingly enough, they couldn't organize well enough to keep it going. And no kidding, the faculty advisor is a friend of mine....last name Bakunin. Too good to be true if you know your history).

Point being- a healthy, diverse environment will provide opportunities for anyone to connect. And the more diverse your faculty and student populations are, the less likely anyone gets left out.

And the best thing about it all? At the end of the day, we all share the same classrooms. I recently sat back and watched the most respectful and educational student-led exchange on religious beliefs between two relatively conservative Muslim girls from Pakistan and 3 other students from Guatemala, El Salvador, and the US. The discussion was centered on why one of the girls chooses to wear hijab and the other doesn't. One is Harvard bound, two are headed for UCLA, the others undecided. It's exchanges like this that give me hope for the future of this country.

Educational scenarios that allow students and teachers to retreat into homogeneous isolation are not conducive to producing thinkers for the world we live in.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Re: Re: Teacher Bias on 05/06/2014 18:58:44 MDT Print View

"Educational scenarios that allow students and teachers to retreat into homogeneous isolation are not conducive to producing thinkers for the world we live in."

A huge +1 for that. Very well put.

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Re: Re: Teacher Bias on 05/06/2014 19:06:19 MDT Print View

my apology Craig, I did not read all the way down. Sorry about that.

Kat, your daughter goes to school in Santa Cruz....enough said

Matthew Perry
(bigfoot2) - F

Locale: Oregon
Wiping tears from my eyes...thanks, Ken. on 05/06/2014 21:57:01 MDT Print View

""So Craig, do you think teachers spew their political beliefs or values while teaching? I would be very interested in hearing this. My wife teaches HS and never, NEVER has she discused politics. If you hate the teaching machine so much, get into private schools or find a different profession...wow"

Ken,

Do you realize that the first half of his response is a quote from Matt?"


LOL. Oh, that was good. Typical. Figures Ken can't be bothered to pay attention and attacks his own side. Friendly fire, I suppose.

Edited by bigfoot2 on 05/06/2014 21:57:36 MDT.

Jennifer Mitol
(Jenmitol) - M

Locale: In my dreams....
Re: Re: Re: Whatever, Ken....you're not the only one who can post garbage. on 05/07/2014 10:21:13 MDT Print View

Well Craig, I believe the problem is that it means students will be taught things like SCIENCE, which we all know is awful (communities should be able to teach whatever they want! Damn the world marketplace!), and HISTORY, which may show us to be not nearly as perfect as we'd like to think we are (slavery?? But the slaves were better off with two parents!), and REASONING, which of course leads to the horrible condition of actually questioning authority.

Something the fabulous state of Texas is certainly trying to do something about!

From the Texas GOP platform on Education: "Knowledge-Based Education – We oppose the teaching of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) (values clarification), critical thinking skills and similar programs that are simply a relabeling of Outcome-Based Education (OBE) (mastery learning) which focus on behavior modification and have the purpose of challenging the student’s fixed beliefs and undermining parental authority."

Matthew Perry
(bigfoot2) - F

Locale: Oregon
Common Core is creating morons. on 05/10/2014 16:11:50 MDT Print View

Jennifer, you never cease to amaze me with your ignorance. Here is an actual Common Core problem for you:

14 + 4.

All you have to do is “Find a Ten.”

Ready?

Step 1: Find the greatest number.

Step 2: Look at the greatest number.

Step 2, Sub-step 1: How many tens in the number?

Step 2, Sub-step 2: How many ones?

Step 2 Sub-step 3: Write the tens and the ones in a number bond.

Step 3: Check your number bond.

Step 3, Sub-step 1: Is it true?

Step 3, Sub-step 2: Will the two parts make the whole greatest number?

No worries. Only three more steps to go…

Step 4: Join the ones together.

Step 4, Sub-step 1: How many ones are there now?

Step 4, Sub-step 2: Write the equation to add the ones.

Step 5: Write your new equation. 10 + _ = _ .

Step 5, Sub-step 1: The second number will be the ones from step 4 (“part” that is left from the number bond).

And finally…

Step 6: Answer the original equation.

Step 6, Sub-step 1: It should be understood that the two equations are equal.

Then they let you in on a little secret:

14 + 4 is the same as 10 + 8.

Anyone for some subtraction?

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Common Core is creating morons. on 05/11/2014 08:46:52 MDT Print View

Matthew you never cease to amaze me.....sigh

http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_25741569/dozens-protesters-ride-atvs-off-limits-canyon-utah


more from the stupid asshats that you idolize....what is next, ATV's on your favorite hiking trails in Yosemite?

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Common Core is creating morons. on 05/11/2014 09:08:46 MDT Print View

I don't see your point Matthew. Kind of a convoluted problem, but still a good exercise of someone's brain.

I don't know what a "number bond" is, but if they're asking about it, they must teach it.

I think it would be better to have problems that are more reality based, like "there are two cars driving away from each other, one at twice the speed....", but questions about numbers are good too.