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Eric Fredricksen
(efredricksen) - MLife

Locale: Silicon Valley
Material for Tailgate Tent on 04/25/2014 13:38:31 MDT Print View

I'm thinking of buying a sewing machine and making something like this for my Land Cruiser:

SafariShell

The truck's too short to stretch out in without the tailgate down. I've previously just left it open, but it was warm and bugless those nights.

I've never made any such thing so I'm not sure what material would be most logical. Any suggestions?

Weight's not much of an issue, probably a bit of elasticity would be nice; quietness, ease of construction, sturdiness also.

(Disclaimer: I realize I'm a bit off-task for lightweight backpacking here, but I thought this crowd would have good ideas. Also, not counting the giant truck, I go pretty light and minimal :)

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Material for Tailgate Tent on 04/25/2014 13:51:17 MDT Print View

I have RV that's bigger than several of your trucks : ) Wife not into sleeping on ground.

Silnylon would work pretty good. http://diygearsupply.com/product-category/coated-fabrics/ is pretty cheap. If you find it's not waterproof enough, just coat it with mineral spirits:silicone. Or buy the Shield from thru-hiker.com.

You could get heavier fabric. Maybe 1.9 oz/yd2 silnylon. But the 1.4 oz/yd2 sil is pretty strong.

Jesse Anderson
(jeepin05) - F

Locale: Land of Enchantment
Re: Material for Tailgate Tent on 04/25/2014 14:43:27 MDT Print View

In addition to Jerry's suggestion you could also look at the Argon silnylon that just became available. It's received pretty good reviews so far and according to Richard's testing, the waterproofing seems to be of a pretty high quality.

David Scheidt
(dscheidt) - F
Re: Material for Tailgate Tent on 04/25/2014 15:56:50 MDT Print View

I'd use vinyl coated polyester. It's reasonably cheap, it's (with proper seam construction and sealing) really waterproof, it's abrasion resistant, and it's UV resistant. Nylon isn't really suitable for the application, because it's not UV resistant. That's not a big concern for lightweight backpacking tents, because they don't spend a huge amount of time in the sun, and tend to wear out for other reasons before the sun kills them. But this is not lightweight, and done right, should last for many years. Making it of nylon will not get you that. If you do decide that nylon is the right material, do not use nylon thread. Nylon thread fails from UV exposure very quickly, and it will fail well before the tent does.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Material for Tailgate Tent on 04/25/2014 16:57:03 MDT Print View

Nylon should be good for maybe a year of in the sun? 365 days of using it on your truck will probably be a lifetime for you.

If you're setting it up in the evening and taking it down in the morning it won't get hardly any sun.

If you were going to have like a basecamp that was set up all the time for years, then nylon wouldn't be good because of UV

Darren Graff
(Packfan) - M

Locale: Sierra Nevadas
Material for tailgate tent on 04/25/2014 19:13:05 MDT Print View

Eric, first I'll say that I loved my land cruiser. I had to let it go. I'm very happy with what I have now.
Rockywoods has a lot of fabric that would work for this project. Sunbrella would work. They use it in boats so it would last a long time. The good thing about it is it breaths. Might be pretty thick and harder to sew. Rockywoods has samples. You might want to go that route. You might just find the perfect fabric you want. If I was needing a quick solution that would be multiple use. I would just take a easy up and modify it to the back of your rig. Some have walls or attach bug netting. When your done using it for sleeping you have shade too. Also works as a back up tent. I hope this helps some. GOD BLESS

Edited by Packfan on 04/25/2014 19:18:15 MDT.

Eric Fredricksen
(efredricksen) - MLife

Locale: Silicon Valley
Thanks! on 04/28/2014 13:54:18 MDT Print View

Thanks everyone! I'll post here when/if I make it.

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
Material for Tailgate Tent on 04/28/2014 15:57:49 MDT Print View

That same project is on my summer list for my FJ62 as well, Eric. I'm leaning toward a wrap for the entire top of the rig so I can block out all light if desired.

FJ60 tent

Ryan Smith
(ViolentGreen) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Material for tailgate tent on 04/28/2014 16:32:35 MDT Print View

"Sunbrella would work. They use it in boats so it would last a long time. The good thing about it is it breaths. Might be pretty thick and harder to sew. Rockywoods has samples. You might want to go that route."

Bingo. I would use Sunbrella. It's the same fabric used in a lot of Pop-up campers and also patio umbrellas.

Ryam

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Material for tailgate tent on 04/28/2014 18:18:55 MDT Print View

I dunno

I bet Sunbrella would be hard to sew

And way overkill

If you wanted to put it over a boat for multiple seasons then that would be good

I'm thinking of doing something like that for a pickup. Just occasional use. I have this plastic intended for greenhouses. Maybe 10 mil? Heavy plastic from the big box store would work, heavier than 3 mil which is marginally okay, good for a prototype.

David Hyde
(dhyde7723) - F
canvas and or mosquito netting on 04/28/2014 19:54:59 MDT Print View

I'm not sure why folks are recommending silnylon. You aren't backpacking. If water is no concern, just use no-see-um/mosquito netting. Breathes well, cheap, and will keep the bugs out.

It you want more water proofness, perhaps polyester or even PVC. Want breathable and warm, can't beat good old fashioned canvas/duck cotton. It's heavy, but largely waterproof, warm, breathable, and even flame resistant!

Ryan Smith
(ViolentGreen) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Re: Re: Material for tailgate tent on 04/29/2014 10:39:53 MDT Print View

"I dunno. I bet Sunbrella would be hard to sew .And way overkill. If you wanted to put it over a boat for multiple seasons then that would be good"

I've never tried to sew it, but it's not especially burley. I think most home machines could handle it provided they were good quality. Sunbrella is good for applications like this because it's waterproof, UV resistant, and breathable. Things that some silnylons can struggle with.

Ryan