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Maia
(maia) - MLife

Locale: Rocky Mountains
The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/15/2014 18:51:17 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/15/2014 20:53:30 MDT Print View

Interesting as usual, thanks

I had a canister once. It was a screw thread type. When I unscrewed stove there was a slow leak. I just left stove on until it was empty. Must have been dirt between valve and valve seat like you mentioned. This was probably 1 of 30 canisters I've bought.

My Coleman Exponent F1 developed an annoying property. First, a couple times I didn't screw it on tight enough, it leaked around side, and caught fire. I just blew it out and screwed it tighter. Maybe the flames damaged a gasket or something. Then, I screwed the stove on tight, used it, and left it overnight when it got to maybe 32 F. When it got cold, the fuel started leaking out and it was empty in the morning. It happened with several canisters. Must be one of those tolerance issues you talked about.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/15/2014 21:49:56 MDT Print View

Hi Jerry

> My Coleman Exponent F1 developed an annoying property. First, a couple times I didn't
> screw it on tight enough, it leaked around side, and caught fire. I just blew it out
> and screwed it tighter. Maybe the flames damaged a gasket or something.

Obviously I can't diagnose at this distance, but that sounds to me as though either the stove was completely missing the sealing O-ring or it was seriously damaged. I have used 'a few' different stoves over 'a few' years, and that sort of leakage should never happen. And my experience with Coleman has been that their stoves do not leak like that either: their safety record is OK.

Mind you, I would put the F1 only a little above the Pocket Rocket for pot stability: those arms are almost as weak as the ones on the PR. Yeah, I'm raving on, but keeping people safe is worth doing.

Cheers

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/16/2014 05:16:20 MDT Print View

Hi Roger, a good article as always.

Leaking canisters has always been my problem. Way back when they were first released, I used one of the older "pierce" models. It failed after just two meals. I returned it.

The older Coleman F1's had a bad problem with what I interpreted as expansion/contraction. Similar to Jerry's description, except at a rather higher temp of around 85F to 40F. This always required me to screw them much tighter, than I cared for, by a half turn or so. You refer to a cold weather problem which explains this. Thanks!

Jerry mentioned an overall failure rate of around 1 in 30. I agree that this is about what I experience with cans. I have recoverd a couple by simply reattaching the stove and then unscrewing it again.

Anyway, I have not experienced any failures with your stove. It seems the plunger rod is a bit longer than on the stoves and works well, provided things are clean.

Kronos Master of Fate
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/16/2014 08:02:11 MDT Print View

Wow. Thanks Roger. I never have issues with the lineal valve canisters. I always buy Snow Peak or Primus canisters. I reuse the plastic cap that covers the valve in the shops too though. Keeps things clean and free of problems. I've only used Primus and Snow Peak stoves. So 30 years experience is limited to that.

Now those pierced canister Gaz stoves on the other hand. "Gee, do I smell gas" while hiking is never a good sign.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/16/2014 08:16:39 MDT Print View

Since I had 1 of maybe 30 and other people haven't had a problem, it's probably rare.

Mine was a Snow Peak. I used it one time - that is, I removed the cap and immediately screwed on stove. Then when I unscrewed stove it was leaking.

I don't think you have to worry about safety, there won't be enough concentration of butane to explode. The problem is that the canister will be empty when you want to use it (and you're cold in the morning and could use some hot fluids to warm up).

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Re: Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/16/2014 09:42:26 MDT Print View

Yeah, 1 out of 30 is pretty low, only about 3% failure rate. I belive one was my fault for not checking before packing up. I believe this may have been prevented. Another there was no hope for. It just stuck wide open. I do not believe this was dirt. I usually have Colman, MSR or SnowPeak canisters here.

Very annoying in the morning, I agree!

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/16/2014 14:16:50 MDT Print View

I must say I am intrigued by the number of cases of problems with leaking valves. Given the number of canisters I have emptied, I was expecting something way under 1% problems. As far as I can remember, I have only ever had one quite slow leak, and that was quickly fixed by giving the valve a quick poke with the CLEAN hook end of a Ti wire stake. I think it blew whatever dirt there was right out.

Cheers

peter vacco
(fluff@inreach.com) - M

Locale: no. california
Re: Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/18/2014 19:22:10 MDT Print View

FANtastic article.
everything a bpl article should be. concise, thorough, and written by a relentlessly detail oriented bloke (whom we all would trust with out lives) just slightly .. off his head.
it is perfect.
and i Thank You for writing it. (and thence, i will go right back to my whisperlite)

but now : i want more. i want Roger C. (and his lively wife) to write a concise, exact, thorough article, about just how to deal with the terrifying experience of when your bear spray nozzle-top falls off in your frikk'n Hand.
how are the un-initiated ones to mend this situation ?
it's a related subject for sure fact.
and it's a nasty bit of McGiver needs going on inside a tent if one is to make it all well.

Great Article !

v.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/18/2014 20:43:35 MDT Print View

"i want Roger C. (and his lively wife) to write a concise, exact, thorough article, about just how to deal with the terrifying experience of when your bear spray nozzle-top falls off in your frikk'n Hand."

If Roger writes it in Australia, it would likely refer to drop bears.

--B.G.--

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: The Care and Feeding of Lindal Valves on 04/26/2014 04:02:58 MDT Print View

Hi Peter

Bear sprays ... could be difficult as I have never seen a bear spray can in the flesh (as it were). And despite Bob's suggestion, I have to add that Australian drop bears are completely immune to bear spray. And to most other things too.

Question: do you have a photo of a bear spray can with the nozzle-top fallen off? I suspect that the Lindal valve for one of these may use the paint spray can connection, which was not covered by my article. But I really don't know.

Maybe you just pick up the fallen nozzle and stick it back on - if shaking hands can manage that?

Cheers