Chamonix
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Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: TMB Trip Report on 11/26/2007 10:51:07 MST Print View

>>Hope you can wait that long!<<

I'll try ;)

Eins

Shahrin Bin Shariff
(zzmelayu) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Table Mountain
Miguel, did you carry your Nikon? on 11/29/2007 17:33:48 MST Print View

>> I'm also working on about 850 photographs so that is taking time to whittle down and then process.

Miguel, BTW did you bite the bullet and carried your Nikon D70 & 18-200mm on the TMB walk? How did you protect it from the elements? How did you carry it to always be ready to capture images? As a photographer, was it worth the weight?

I am trying to justify to myself to take the D40+same lens instead of a smaller camera (6 oz Canon IXUS).

greg paton
(gregpaton) - F
HIking TMB in late May on 01/22/2008 17:04:23 MST Print View

I'm going to be Geneva in late May for work and am looking into hiking TMB . Any thoughts on conditions / temperatures? Would many hikers go this early?

Lo Renz
(Laurens) - F
- on 02/26/2008 15:59:05 MST Print View

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Edited by Laurens on 07/22/2011 06:10:03 MDT.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Miguel, did you carry your Nikon? on 02/26/2008 17:19:15 MST Print View

Shah, I don't know how I missed this, but I only now came across your question to me! Sorry!

I did take my Nikon D70s and the 18-200mm lens. It was heavy and sometimes I wished for something lighter, but as a semi-professional photographer I never regretted once taking it. It just has the control I need and the instant on convenience (which allowed me to get images the moment they happened) and the through-the-lens immediacy of viewing a scene (usually I dislike holding the camera away from my face to view the monitor, though sometimes that is just the thing for macro shots).

I protected the camera with a waterproof MontBell camera cover that you wrap around the camera and carry attached to the camera strap at all times. It can instantly be opened when the camera is needed. This cover also helped to protect the camera when I put the camera in my backpack. Not much cushioning, but enough to prevent scratches. I was able to walk in the rain with this setup and not worry about the camera getting wet.

I looked around everywhere for a waistbelt camera bag big enough for an SLR camera and a medium length lens, but everything I found stuck out too much from my abdomen and got in the way of walking and the backpack hipbelt. I just happened to come across the MontBell Trail Lumbar Pack 6.5, which is just a regular lumbar pack, but big enough for both the camera and the lens, plus extra camera accessories like the remote control, extra batteries and flash cards, cleaning fluid and cloth (plus some extra space for my passport and travel documents). I stuck in a closed cell padding to protect the camera and pack walls. What is great about this pack for photography is that it cinches around my waist very snugly and unobtrusively and has a profile that doesn't get in the way of climbing. Also the zipper opening on top opens wide enough that stuffing in and pulling out the camera is smooth and hassle free, unlike any other regular lumbar pack I've used. It is the camera bag I use all the time now when I'm only carrying one lens.

Hope that was of some help. BY the way, are you still hanging out here? Haven't seen you post in quite a while!

Miguel

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Helicopters in Italy? on 02/26/2008 17:26:22 MST Print View

Laurens,

There are a lot of helicopters, for all sorts of reasons, I guess. While in the Italian portion of the walk they were around all the time; it was hard to get away from the sound of them all day. A lot of what they did was supply the gites and refugios with food and supplies, but I'm sure they were also keeping an eye out on walkers. Later in the evenings they usually disappeared though and I don't think it was much problem to just set up your tent in a secluded spot. The area at the base of the slope on which Refugio Elisabeta sits, a big river basin, is one great spot for setting up your tent, and quite a few people did it. Some of the refugios frowned on wild camping, but at Refugio Elena, since the beds were full, I just asked and they let me camp out back (amidst the cow patties, unfortunately). In most cases I don't think you have anything to worry about. Just be discreet.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: HIking TMB in late May on 02/26/2008 17:30:19 MST Print View

May, hmmm. I haven't been there at that time, but since I got snow in August I would imagine May to be pretty cold, possibly even snowbound in some places. If you stayed low and skirted the high passes it might be passable, though. Anyone else know? Roger? Jeroen? Carlos?

Lo Renz
(Laurens) - F
- on 02/27/2008 05:51:52 MST Print View

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Edited by Laurens on 07/22/2011 06:09:25 MDT.

Harald Loeffel
(hikingharry) - F

Locale: Tyrol - Austria
Re: Re: Helicopters in Italy? on 02/27/2008 14:33:55 MST Print View

I hiked the TMB last year and started in Champex on July 16th in clockwise direction. I saw or heard only a few helicopters in Italy, near Courmayeur, in the middle of the day.

But around Chamonix I saw many, many helicopters, even at dusk in the late evening. But I was under my tarp in a forest in the valley, because of two consecutive days of rain, and the Grand Balcon was fully in the clouds. So no worries for me.

But I met quite a few people camping by the huts or higher up, if the weather was good.

CW or CCW - I went clockwise. So I met people very often, so I had the feeling, that there were many people. Next time I would do it CW, so I bypass some people, but have not the crowds coming against me. But I think at the end of June the TMB is still comparatively quiet.

hikingharry

Edited by hikingharry on 02/27/2008 14:34:26 MST.

Harald Loeffel
(hikingharry) - F

Locale: Tyrol - Austria
Re: HIking TMB in late May on 02/27/2008 14:41:25 MST Print View

Not that I have that much experience with the French Alps, but the more with the Austrian Alps, where May is late season skitouring time in the high mountains.

So I think the end of May is a little bit to early to hike the complete TMB. But you could maybe hike some parts of it. You could google some webcams from the area to get an impression how much snow is there.

Cheers hikingharry

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: HIking TMB in late May on 02/28/2008 02:54:36 MST Print View

> since I got snow in August I would imagine May to be pretty cold, possibly even snowbound in some places.
Variable, VERY variable, from year to year. You can't predict.

We had snow on the Col du Bonhomme in August, and could not traverse the Crete des Gites. OK, we couldn't even see it! Other passes were all OK.

We started in the Pyrenees in May (before we came anywhere near the GR5), and had to take a different route from the one we had hoped. The passes were completely blocked by snow, and we were UL-equipped for summer.

Better take some warm clothing ...

cheers

Lo Renz
(Laurens) - F
- on 03/03/2008 05:28:51 MST Print View

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Edited by Laurens on 07/22/2011 06:08:36 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Re: Helicopters in Italy? on 03/04/2008 02:44:10 MST Print View

> What possibilities does one have on this trail of buying food?
The FFRP TMB guide should list all the places you can buy food.
Les Houches - big supermarket
Les Contamines - supermarket
Les Chapieux - small shop, limited
Courmeyer - big supermarket
Ferret - supermarket
Champex - supermarket
Col de Balme - do NOT stop here!!!!!

Cheers
Roger

Woubeir (from Europe)
(Woubeir) - F - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: Helicopters in Italy? on 03/04/2008 03:04:34 MST Print View

"Col de Balme - do NOT stop here!!!!!"
I guess we were not the only ones to have a bad experience with the host :-)

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Helicopters in Italy? on 03/04/2008 04:15:09 MST Print View

Hah haaaaah! I had the misfortune of stepping into the Col de la Balme refugio during a lunch break to ask if there was a toilet I could use... and unhappily stepped right into the path of the infamous Monster Lady who runs the place! She said in French quote, "What is it with you stupid hikers? Can't you all just hold it in until you get off the "#$%%&%$! mountain?" And with that she stomped away barking at other people milling about in the refugio. Needless to say I found I didn't have to go to the toilet any more!

I camped at Le Peuty just outside Trient the day before. You can buy supplies in the small town of Trient. The owner of the campsite in Le Peuty was the mayor of Trient and he personally came out in the pouring rain to check up on me and to bring me a load of firewood.

Edited by butuki on 03/04/2008 04:15:57 MST.

Lo Renz
(Laurens) - F
- on 03/04/2008 05:11:42 MST Print View

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Edited by Laurens on 07/22/2011 06:07:47 MDT.