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Cold weather cooking - stove choices
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Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Fire Ball on 03/06/2014 15:30:45 MST Print View

"There is of course no fuel gauge."

That's what this country needs, a nickel cigar and a fuel gauge on a stove!

That will be my platform for the next election.

"go with a proprietary "fuel paste" to place in the priming trough"

I had good luck with Mauze Fire Ribbon back in the early days when I used a stove of that type. Once I learned exactly how to prime the XGK, then I didn't need the stuff anymore.

--B.G.--

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Thanks on 03/06/2014 16:31:35 MST Print View

"I'm in NC so high teens and low 20s is typically about the lower limit - but in scouts we do most of our camping in shoulder seasons and winter (summer is camps, etc...) so I've had my canister get shaky several times."

Same here - low 20s

Have shallow container for water, or plastic lid that fits over bottom of canister is really slick.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Re: Cold weather cooking - stove choices on 03/06/2014 18:22:27 MST Print View

Hi David

> Are you saying replacing the sintered brass filter is unnecessary running the
> FMS 300T as intended (upright and using good-quality canister like Snowpeak)?
Correct. Any dirt which might be in the canister stays at the bottom.

Cheers

M G
(drown) - F - MLife

Locale: Shenandoah
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Cold weather cooking - stove choices on 03/06/2014 18:35:07 MST Print View

"> Are you saying replacing the sintered brass filter is unnecessary running the
> FMS 300T as intended (upright and using good-quality canister like Snowpeak)?
Correct. Any dirt which might be in the canister stays at the bottom."

This has been my experience so far. I really like the stove, it's very efficient. Surprisingly stable even with wide diameter pots given the small size. I've been using it since last spring. Almost a year. Probably close to 30 nights out. No clogs or performance issues yet. Fingers crossed it stays that way.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Cold weather cooking - stove choices on 03/06/2014 18:48:22 MST Print View

Bob, I like the old MSR stoves, I have a total of about 24 in my stove collection, including more modern stoves like a Dragonfly from 1999, many multiples, some slight differences within the model, all very loud except the WL's and 600. My shortened beard over the winter shows my sometimes forgotten regard for fire. :)
Duane

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: Cold weather cooking - stove choices on 03/06/2014 18:59:24 MST Print View

Hi Nick

> I keep reading about the field failures and taking out filters and replacing them
> with toilet paper,
A shade unfair. The 'light Korean/Chinese canister stoves' are actually very good, but they are designed for use as uprights.

---------------------------------------

Perhaps. I apologize.

I only use MSR or Snow Peak canisters. Perhaps they have better quality control with their fuel (whoever produces the canisters for them).

I used my "upright" only WindPro (version 1) only in the inverted position with nary a problem. I didn't do the hose modification and it was a bit of a pain to invert the canister, so I gave it to a friend and bought a WindPro II. Not a single problem with the II either and I only run it in liquid mode.

The design is proven (basically a Whisperlite unit) and it is made in the USA. A bit heavier than the Korean/Chinese stoves, but I trust MSR stoves. A stove failure in summer is not a big deal -- it winter it is.

When I expect really bad weather (lots of snow and wind) I am still taking the DragonFly or WhisperLite. Only because I trust them and the WindPro II hasn't earned by complete confidence as a serious winter gas stove yet.

Tipi Walter
(TipiWalter) - F
Beloved Brass on 03/06/2014 19:03:37 MST Print View

Of course everyone probably knows about these---

http://www.pbase.com/mad_monte1/image/57053282

http://www.pbase.com/mad_monte1/_retro_outdoor_gear&page=all

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Svea on 03/06/2014 19:24:58 MST Print View

As I said earlier, not the greatest winter stove but I never had a problem getting to work in cold weather.

I have owned two of them for over 40 years. One is dedicated to a Sigg Tourist set and the other for all other trips where large pots are not needed, which is most of the time.

I have replaced several wicks and many cap gaskets (I have a drawer full of them). Never needed to replace the valve graphite packing but I have some, somewhere in the garage.

Metaphorically I can get these to work in my sleep. With experience they are great stoves.

Regarding running out of fuel. My routine is to fill the stove base every morning before cooking breakfast. I always carried a small plastic funnel to fill the tank. At one time Sigg made a bottle cap with a spout. I bought one but never used it. It is probably in the garage somewhere. I strained the white gas at home from the gallon can. When I did long trips requiring obtaining fuel in town, I brought a small metal funnel with a fine mesh screen to pour into the stove tank from the fuel bottle. In those days bulk Blazo fuel was sold in every Chevron or Standard station. Cost was about 35 cents a gallon and I could fill my two fuel bottles for about 10 cents. Most of the time the station attendant would just give me the fuel.

Never lost a pot support.

I officially retired the Sveas in 2008, but take them once or twice a year on trips, just for nostalgia sake.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Svea on 03/06/2014 19:37:38 MST Print View

Nick, have you ever considered leading guided tours of your garage?

--B.G.--

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Fire Ball on 03/06/2014 20:43:57 MST Print View

Yeah, I have used a SVEA for almost 40 years (boy it doesn't seem that long.) Anyway, when I traded for some flies I had tied, I got a fuel bottle and a pair of caps from Optimus. The one had a small tube for filling and a hole in the back for stopping the flow. I always made it a practice to fill after every use. In warmer weather, I didn't bring the pump. Rather, I used the tube, about the size of a bic pen cartridge, to pour it into the so called "spirit cup." I never had to prime more than was needed once I got used to it (takes four or five uses.) After I switched to a coke bottle, I would just strip some 12ga/10ga wire and insert it tightly into a spare top use the vinal casing as a fill tube. I tried to glue and epoxy it, but that failed after several weeks, so the mechanical seal actually worked better.

The Midi pump really doesn't save fuel because it doesn't really fill the cup. When it is leaking down the side, it is a whole bunch easier to light. While lit, I would turn the valve off. As the flame died off, ie, till it was almost burned out, turn it on to run. I never used the fire paste.

Generally it burns about an ounce per day, unless you are melting snow. 1L in the morning, 1L at night with about 5-7 minutes of "simmer". A 16 floz bottle only weighs about 14-1/2 ounces which is enough for just about 16 days...closer to 7/8oz per day. Since the fuel bottle was used for both priming and cooking, that was already figured.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Svea on 03/06/2014 20:49:16 MST Print View

"Nick, have you ever considered leading guided tours of your garage?"

There is so much stuff in it, I need a guide to find stuff. My wife wishes we could park our vehicles in it.

Paul McLaughlin
(paul) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Cold weather cooking - stove choices on 03/07/2014 12:39:57 MST Print View

Roger - Okay, second iteration maybe not so accurate - how 'bout we call it the second "release"?
that's how the software guys do it.

robert van putten
(Bawana) - F

Locale: Planet Bob
To each the their own on 03/07/2014 12:50:39 MST Print View

I've never used a Svea 123 ( I'm still rebuilding my first! I need a key and graphite seal..) but I do have plenty of practice with an Optimus 8R. I quite like the old beastie, just not for backpacking as it is a heavy toy. Always gets the job done!


Priming in the snow -

8r

Runs fine in cold weather -

8R in the snow

My idea of winter cold isn't arctic though. Boy, talk about a tiny gas tank and filer!
Never ran out of fuel when cooking with it, I'd simply refill it once a day.
Had to carry a little funnel for it.

Ya know, I always opened the gas cap prior to priming it to release any vacuum. I reckon that is an essential step with any such heat-pressurized stove.
I prime with a bit of soda straw that I carry in the case. Open gas cap, stick straw in, put thumb over base of straw, remove it and drip the bit off gas into the priming cup. Works great.

A feller can buy a new Svea and I reckon that is about as good a choice as anything else, if it tickles yer fancy.

Edited by Bawana on 03/07/2014 12:52:38 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Re: Cold weather cooking - stove choices on 03/07/2014 13:50:05 MST Print View

Hi Paul

> second iteration maybe not so accurate - how 'bout we call it the second "release"?
Oh, you can call it whatever you like. But it may not describe reality very well.

I have been making the stove in batches of about 16 - the jigs used for some of the parts determine the batch size.
After every batch I have reviewed all the feedback from beta testers AND my own assessments to see what improvements could be made in the next batch. There have been no major changes so far, and I don't expect there to be any either. Most of the changes have been very minor tweaks of dimensions - typically by a fraction of a millimetre, to make the machining easier.

The only really visible change has been the redesign of the tripod legs. That happened right at the start, and meant I had to scrap about 10 sets of legs. later on there was a slight change when I moved a little tab on the legs by about 15 mm. I don't expect any further changes there either.

The question you need to ask is whether there will be a 'second release'. Will I continue making stoves after I have finished the 100? I don't know.

Cheers

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
To each the their own on 03/07/2014 14:01:22 MST Print View

I have ten Optimus 8/8R's and one Russian clone, run great after a good prime. I've read that the original 123/123R's made in Sweden are better quality than the new R's, made in China. The originals should say on the top, "made in Sweden".
Duane

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: To each the their own on 03/07/2014 14:15:01 MST Print View

Robert, the SVEA 123r is still sold. You can purchase parts from Optimus: http://www.optimusstoves.com/

robert van putten
(Bawana) - F

Locale: Planet Bob
Wow! on 03/07/2014 14:19:58 MST Print View

You have ten 8/8Rs!!!
Ye gods and little fishes! So I gather you kinda like these stoves?
Do you use 'em much or mostly collect 'em?

Back in the day I remember my older brother had an Optimus 8R.
He had an nylon pack with an aluminum external frame, a down filled sleeping bag and that beautiful blue 8R. How I envied his outfit!
I has a canvas rucksack, a sterno stove and a cheap synthetic bag!

I used to sneak into his room and play with that 8R when I could!

So, years later, when I finally found an 8R for sale I had to have it, even though I already has an MSR Whisperlight!

Zorg Zumo
(BurnNotice) - F
I've fallen in love with my SVEA123R on 03/07/2014 14:41:50 MST Print View

I've only had it for less than a year, but I really like the little bugger. I use it with the Optimus HE Weekender pot. I created a safe flashing windscreen for it. And I improved the priming by wiring a chunk of wood stove door gasket around the base of the stem. Oh and the very first thing I did was move the key chain from the stem to the brass windscreen body.

I carry a circle of silicone pot-holder for base insulation. And I made a reflectix cozy for the pot. Everything nests together nicely.

And the main thing is that it WORKS. Always. And it simmers. And it is miserly with fuel. And it doesn't seem to care what I put in it (unleaded, Coleman, mineral spirits). It has just enough BTU output for winter use for one person. I'm half-deaf so I don't mind the puttering sound of it running.

I figured out a way to simmer with big pots on hot days without popping the relief. And I found that wiping some FP-10 on the brass prevents corrosion.

I think I'm irrationally attracted to shiny things with few moving parts that just work without excuses.

Matt Dirksen
(NamelessWay) - MLife

Locale: Mid Atlantic
XGK-II .... with kerosene on 03/07/2014 15:55:49 MST Print View

As much as I love my old 123R and the 8R hunter, I have settled down with using my XGK-II in the winter, but with kerosene, not white gas.

Yeah it's a little more of a chore to start the thing with kerosene (fire ribbon), but once its burning, its very powerful and totally consistent, regardless of the temperature.

I pretty much only use it for the winters, now.

But if I had to choose one stove for the cold, there's no question that would be the one.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: To each the their own on 03/07/2014 16:33:03 MST Print View

Duane, I believe they fired the Chinese manufacturor of the SVEA. Some of the aluminum parts are still made there, or were left over from a larger order. Latvia(??) I believe is producing most of the parts with the valves(?) machined/assembled in Sweden, again.