Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter
1 oz, Durable* Cook kit
Display Avatars Sort By:
todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: Inner Ring on 02/27/2014 11:44:19 MST Print View

Thanks for the tip, D S, on the ring removal - worked like a charm and I don't know why I didn't think of it. It has been the reason I haven't taken the BD can on a trip! Duh.

I had to try my version of this kit (SORRY - I haven't weighed it!!!!) :(
I use the BD can w/ 10oz 62deg water, Ti-wing Esbit stove, tealight (standard) w/denatured alc., roasting pan windscreen w/holes punched along the bottom, foil lid.

This thing can boil (full rolling boil) 9-10oz every time (yes, controlled environment, but I wouldn't hesitate to do this in the field since I don't need rolling boils to rehydrate my meals - HOT water will do) on just over 1/2 (1/4 ounce-ish) of a tealight of alcohol.

What will make me try this in the field is that after using the ring removal tip from D S, the plastic lid still fits :)

Edited by funnymoney on 02/27/2014 11:45:02 MST.

D S
(smoke) - F
More info on 02/27/2014 12:32:37 MST Print View

On the BDA can - if you want a metal lid, the safety cut lid off a fruit can will fit like a glove. My BDA can uses the fruit can lid with a spectra loop and vent hole, together with the plastic lid that has the center cut out for holding it all together.

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: More info on 02/27/2014 12:40:47 MST Print View

Cool. What kind of fruit can?

D S
(smoke) - F
Take your BDA can with you - on 02/27/2014 12:44:15 MST Print View

I used a generic store brand pineapple chunks can. Just take your BDA can to the store and size it up. I'm pretty sure the fruit cocktail can was the same size.

Added bonus - you can get one lid off the top and another off the bottom.

Edited by smoke on 02/27/2014 12:46:52 MST.

Adam Kilpatrick
(oysters) - MLife

Locale: South Australia
Japanese bottle cans on 02/27/2014 21:41:46 MST Print View

I just picked up a couple of Aluminium (I think) screw capped bottles from a nearby convenience store. Both are around the 400gram mark. One of them, a black coffee, has a plastic/paper label which I've taken off, so its already nice and shiny. I finished the other, a fizzy fruit juice and it definitely seems pretty light. I'll weight them both soon and figure out the volume. I think the gauge of the metal in them is a little stronger than normal Australian soft drink (eg coke) cans, but not overly so, plus the cone head does seem to make them quite rigid and of course I'm not cutting that off, so the integrity is quite good. They would definitely last a long time kept in a shoulder bottle pocket.

I'll have to pick up some Esbit too from the local outdoor store to try, only brought a gas stove with me to Japan.

Adam Kilpatrick
(oysters) - MLife

Locale: South Australia
Re: Japanese bottle cans on 02/27/2014 22:26:37 MST Print View

Just weighed these, details in this thread (Matt's original thread with the concept) so that I don't cause too much thread drift, sorry!

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/process#forumtop

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Aluminum and steel Diamond Nut cans on 02/27/2014 22:30:19 MST Print View

"Which ones are made of aluminum?"

"Every one of the Blue Diamond Almonds cans that I looked at today at the store.

--B.G.--"

This must vary by region, then. I buy lots of these cans to snack on at work.

http://www.bluediamond.com/index.cfm?navId=31

The can is thin-walled, a gold-ish color on the outside and grey on the inside, and a magnet sticks to it great.

Andy
-----------------------------------

Hey Andy, that's interesting. Didn't think they would have 2 packaging companies using different cans. Wonder where Bob lives that he found the aluminum cans. I'll check the local stores to see what I find. Thanks for posting your findings.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Aluminum and steel Diamond Nut cans on 02/27/2014 22:41:37 MST Print View

"Didn't think they would have 2 packaging companies using different cans."

Not only that, but there were no 10-ounce cans. All I found were 9 ounces. Blue Diamond does not want to make it seem like they are jacking their prices up. Instead, they keep the price the same and reduce the can size.

--B.G.--

Andrew Stow
(AndyS) - F - MLife

Locale: Midwest USA
Re: Re: Aluminum and steel Diamond Nut cans on 02/28/2014 09:29:46 MST Print View

"Not only that, but there were no 10-ounce cans. All I found were 9 ounces."

I can only find the ones I want (salt 'n vinegar) in 6 oz cans. I don't think I've seen even the more common smokehouse flavor in bigger cans. The next size up is a 1 lb bag.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/22/2015 09:59:49 MST Print View

Jeremy, I put this one together for you :-)

The pot, stainless steel foil lid(more durable than aluminum), stainless steel wire pot supprt, aluminum pot support stabilizer, carbon felt ground protector and stainless steel Esbit tray combined total weight is 27 grams.

Foster pot has 2 cup+ capacity. The ridgeline in the center of the "F" is the 2 cup mark. The pot has an aluminum bottom and top rim.

The stove has integrated parts, nothing loose that can get lost.

 photo 27gram20cook20kit20002_zpszuaoqa2i.jpg

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/22/2015 18:58:09 MST Print View

Jeremy, just had a thought to reduce the grams. Use aluminum for the pot lid and reduce the size of the esbit tray.

Jeremy Rardin
(JearBear) - F

Locale: Cumberland Trail
Re: Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/22/2015 20:11:00 MST Print View

That is great! remember seeing that stove but I don't remember now why I didn't go with it. I think I overlooked because it wouldn't have secured the pot I was using at the time because it wasn't flat bottom.

But this gives double the amount of water! If you replace the lid with foil then you could add a foil windscreen and be good to go :)

How much does the pot alone weigh?

EDIT: I remember now why I didn't try that combination; Zelph lists the flat bottom foster pot weighing 27 grams by itself: http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/foster-2-cup-flat-bottom.php

I still carry my 1 oz system, but I am backing away from it as I mostly only take trips in groups anyways haha.

Edited by JearBear on 02/22/2015 20:13:56 MST.

Adam Kilpatrick
(oysters) - MLife

Locale: South Australia
Re: Re: Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/23/2015 04:34:38 MST Print View

Sheesh this looks good Dan

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/23/2015 09:50:41 MST Print View

Jeremy, this stove design is new, designed it Friday based on some concerns I've read in a few threads.

The pot in the photo is the kind you have and I've used aluminum foil as the lid. I reduced weight of the esbit tray and came up with 20 grams total weight for pot and one piece stove. This design is in staying with SUL concepts. The one piece stove is a "thing" I've had for many years in my DIY tinkering. The keep it super simple thing;)

These 2 items are the basis of the kit. Now I can add a SS windscreen that will fit inside the pot.

I have options, the 10 ounce capacity or the 16+ ounce.

For a party of 2, I give one kit to my partner and share the experience ;) we can sit around and shoot the breeze while we watch the water boil ;) If we had canister stoves it might be a little difficult to hear each other ;)


 photo 2020gram20set-up20001_zpsfg9gzb62.jpg

Edited to add: Jeremy, the aluminum bottom, 2 cup flat foster pot has never been listed on my site.

Edited by zelph on 02/23/2015 09:54:05 MST.

Jeremy Rardin
(JearBear) - F

Locale: Cumberland Trail
Re: Re: Re: Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/23/2015 11:41:54 MST Print View

Oh I see the difference in the stove now - I was confusing it with the starlyte stove. I didn't realize that you were zelph! haha

Edited to add: how much does the aluminum bottom 2 cup foster pot weigh? And are they for sale? :) I was confusing it with the foster pot at this link: http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/foster-2-cup-flat-bottom.php

Edited by JearBear on 02/23/2015 11:47:45 MST.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/23/2015 13:52:34 MST Print View

Pot only weighs 17 grams. I don't have any for sale, never did. Never got that far into SUL kits. John Abbela had something interesting to say about SUL. I'll have to get the quotes together side by side for you to read and then we can talk about SUL. In your recent thread you say you still carry the 1oz kit but I get the impression that you are farther away now from the SUL way of thinking when it comes to cook kits.

Jeremy Rardin
(JearBear) - F

Locale: Cumberland Trail
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/23/2015 14:30:48 MST Print View

I am farther away from SUL in my packing list in general because I spend less time on the trail that I used to and I also spend less time/money on gear. I still use my 1 oz cook kit when I carry 7 or 8 lb pack because I found that it is all I need. I add a small corner of a rag to wipe off the esbit if I use a tab instead of alcohol. It isn't that I have found that setup unreliable or unsuitable. If that foster pot was available I would definitely purchase one haha.

edited to add: SUL isn't for everyone and to a degree it isn't really for me entirely. But I like the SUL forum best because those who are involved take everything into consideration - which I appreciate. I don't find it worth it to sleep on the ground with half a sleeping pad or push the rating of my quilt because 7 oz more down means a lot more comfort.

Something I appreciate about SUL cook kits is they are also less expensive than spending a lot on gas stoves or canister stoves. I love using esbit because I can just add some tablets in a bag and go.

Edited by JearBear on 02/23/2015 14:35:19 MST.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
What's in John A's kit on 02/23/2015 17:44:50 MST Print View

Jeremy, let's take a look at some high point of what John A said:


Re: 1 oz, Durable* Cook kit on 02/26/2014 00:47:57 MST
(JohnAbela)
Quote (emphasis added by me)
3) I think playing around with these kinds of setups is fun and totally worth the time invested in the pursuit of learning SUL/XUL hiking. You learn what works and does not work for you. The awesome thing about backpacking is we all have options to use and go with different gear and use what works for us, eh!! I still have the pot and the stand somewhere, but they have never been used since I initially tested it.

4) It was just a little too little amount of water

6) If given the option of a 6 g stand that has parts that can be lost, vs an 8 gram wire mesh stand (say, one of these cut down in height) I will choose the 8 gram one. I want reliability in my gear
So, I choose to ditch the stand and the too-small-for-me cup and bounce up to a wire mesh stand and a slightly larger pot.

7) Tealight holder
If its to prevent esbit sludge, well, that I understand and that is all I ever used a teacandle holder for. (c) If it is for ground protection, sorry but that is just not enough. Even the all-too-typical .005" thick titanium that companies enjoy packaging these days as part of a 'complete kit' is not thick enough. I have almost started a few ground fires because of not having a thick enough ground protection when using esbit. I have found that one of the few things that really works is a square cut piece of carbon felt.

9) Umm, I guess what we really need to address here is "does a pot of this size, with this little amount of water, really justify even worrying about efficiency?" I mean lets just be honest here, a little 4g esbit table is about all a person would need to bring this amount of water to a temperature good enough for your tea/coffee and almost warm enough to be viable at a meal rehydration without it being too cold. Go with a 4g and a 4g broken in half, so you have 6g and you can (should??) be able to reach the 200(f)+ mark with this little amount of water (have you tested this yet Jeremy??) So, anyway, my vote just goes for doing away with the teacup and/or the BGET. If the goal is to have the lightest setup possible, carrying either/both of them make no sense as they are just not going to provide a viable amount of efficiency. Lets remember, the fastest way to get water to boil, and the hottest way to get esbit, is without any of these kind of things... just the straight esbit set underneath the pot. All these kind of things (BGET/TDGC/FF14) really are designed to do is give you a longer burning time, not to give you a faster boil time.

10) DS said: "I also have one of Zelph's pots. It's small. It can be easily duped using a Blue Diamond Almond can (the short pot doesn't need ridges, IMO)". Ditto and totally agree. I bought a few different size BDA containers when I was playing around trying with this same stuff.
13) Jeremy said: "I am thinking about putting 10 or so of these setups together and selling them for 40$ or so". Uggh, I think that is kinda priced over the top Jeremy. I think the average SUL/XUL hiker is just not going to put out that kind of money for this specific setup. $20 bucks, maybe... if shipping was included. Unfortunately, and yet the reality is, this is just too small of a niche market


(JohnAbela)
Re: Whats your SUL Cook Set-Up Grams/Milliliter % on 02/21/2015

Too many people thread-drifting in this thread... as usual.


uhh, so my setup is 44.14 grams, minus a mini-bic, which right now is 11 grams... but I have no flipping idea how much fuel is still in it... and the pot holds 400ml


I'll let you all play with the math from there, to do whatever it is all of you are wanting with this data.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Edited to say my "emphasis" underlines and red highlight did not show up...bummer!

These are the things I had highlighted:

I still have the pot and the stand somewhere, but they have never been used since I initially tested it.

. I want reliability in my gear
So, I choose to ditch the stand and the too-small-for-me cup and bounce up to a wire mesh stand and a slightly larger pot.



. I have found that one of the few things that really works is a square cut piece of carbon felt.

Unfortunately, and yet the reality is, this is just too small of a niche market

Edited by zelph on 02/23/2015 17:52:00 MST.

Jeremy Rardin
(JearBear) - F

Locale: Cumberland Trail
Re: What's in John A's kit on 02/23/2015 18:16:29 MST Print View

3. Agreed

4. To each their own. 8oz is all I need to reheat ramen or noodles - not enough water for most people which is definitely to each their own. If I had that aluminimum flat bottom then I would use that rather than this for sure! More water is definitely better than less.

6. It is funny when people say something can too easily be lost because they surely don't carry doubles of everything. If I lost one of the holders for the stands, tape would suffice. If I lost a stand, I could use just two. If I lost the whole thing I could use sticks or rocks. My goal WAS to see if I could get it to 28 grams, which was for fun. 2 grams wouldn't put me over the edge of SUL and surely wouldn't break my back lol.

7. The tealight is for dual purpose esbit or denatured alcohol. I have yet to have my tealight cup burn through after many many uses - and if it did I cook on a dirt patch not dried grass.

9. I have gotten a boil from 4 and 6 grams esbit.

13. $40 was 5$ difference of what it was for me to get all the materials because it was $15 alone for the stands. But you are right it was silly because it is a small niche and people have different paths to the same goal.

I was encouraged to see a few people say they put it together and that it worked for them!

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: What's in John A's kit on 02/23/2015 19:17:13 MST Print View

Jeremy, I agree with you on the amount of water needed for a meal. I don't do soup :-))) I freezer bag Mountain House and use 1 cup to rehydrate. I eat my meals, not drink them. One cup rehydrates Ramen to perfection and I use only 1/2 the seasoning packet per serving.

I did a special make for John and like you can see in his comment, it still sits on the shelf. Today he uses a 400ml pot. He changes as time goes along.

John is right about SUL being a special niche, same with esbit users...small quantity of people use it. Recent comments and old ones seen in threads indicate too many negatives when it's talked about. There are those that swear by it and that will be seen forever....the die hards. If someone wants to get into using esbit, it should be with the 4 gram tablets. Less odor and more economical weight wise.

Wood is my goto fuel. Alcohol is my back-up. Aluminum bottom pots do well in wood fires. Esbit is a play thing.

This rock and pie pan thing is a real belly laugh.

Back to what John said. Burning esbit full bore is the way to go that's why I reduced my esbit tray to a flat disc with small raised edge to contain liquefied esbit as it burns.