Forum Index » GEAR » Breathability Ratings for eVent vs. DWR Silnylon?


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Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Breathability Ratings for eVent vs. DWR Silnylon? on 02/18/2014 12:09:53 MST Print View

Comparing an eVent bivy to a Water Resistant bivy like the MLD Superlight, what's the breathability rating discrepancy?

In other words, how much more/less breathable is eVent? Anyone happen to know?

Thank you!
-Max

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: Breathability Ratings for eVent vs. DWR Silnylon? on 02/18/2014 17:46:16 MST Print View

Event (waterproof) may be 21,000 gr/m2/day (found in another post on BPL)
Gore-Tex PacLite about 15,000+ gr/m2/day (taken from wikipedia)
Silnylon (waterproof) bottom of bivy is not breathable
Momentum (water resistant) top may be 25,000+ gr/m2/day

Edited by jshann on 02/18/2014 20:00:13 MST.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Wicked on 02/18/2014 17:49:59 MST Print View

Yeah, the breathability ratings were definitely what I was looking for. Thanks!

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: Breathability Ratings for eVent vs. DWR Silnylon? on 02/18/2014 18:53:06 MST Print View

John S.

Could you edit/add a line for Gore-Tex Paclite? (Or whatever is the latest and greatest from Gore?)

Thanks.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: Re: Re: Breathability Ratings for eVent vs. DWR Silnylon? on 02/18/2014 20:01:08 MST Print View

Found a rating on wikipedia Greg. I don't know how reliable all of those numbers are though.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Chart on 02/18/2014 20:11:29 MST Print View

I found another resource that had this to say:

eVent

That being said, I defer to BPL testing because this chart seems suspect (Gore-Tex 2 and 3 layer are identical? hmm...) and I thought someone had the scoop; I am excited to hear other opinions or even anecdotal reports too.

Edited by mdilthey on 02/18/2014 20:12:29 MST.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Natick Chart on 02/18/2014 21:07:29 MST Print View

This chart from Natick is now 15 years old -

Breathability

The full PDF is buried somewhere in Verber's Website

Is there anything more recent?

Edited by greg23 on 02/18/2014 21:12:25 MST.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Relevant Data on 02/18/2014 21:30:10 MST Print View

Too bad that chart doesn't have eVent... not to mention, the state of the market in the late 90's was surely different.

Edit: I see it now, thanks Dave!

Edited by mdilthey on 02/18/2014 21:48:33 MST.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Relevant Data on 02/18/2014 21:41:34 MST Print View

"Too bad that chart doesn't have eVent... not to mention, the state of the market in the late 90's was surely different."

Sure it does.

steven franchuk
(Surf) - M
Re: Re: Natick Chart on 02/19/2014 00:34:17 MST Print View

the chart may be dated but it is still usefull. It can also be confusing. In this chart the beast breathable fabrics are on the bottom not on the top like most people are use to seeing.

On this chart zero on the vertical axis is the most breathable. 100 is the worst. The x axis is the humidity on both sides of the fabric. most of the fabrics on the chart are a slanted line. Which means these fabrics have very poor breathability at 30% humidity. The breathability then increase as the humidity climes. Most of these fabrics use polyurethane membranes.

"Too bad that chart doesn't have eVent..."

Most people would expect the best fabric near the top. For this chart you need to look at the bottom. there you will find Event, Expanded PTFE, and Entrant.

Expanded PTFE is the original version of Gortex. they stopped making it after it was found that body oils would clog the membrane preventing it from breathing. most Gortex today has the expanded PTFE membrane with a very thin Polyurethane membrane on it. The PTFE is now a support structure for a very thin, fragile, and very breathable polyurethane membrane.

Entrant was a microporous polyurethane membrane that looked really promising when I saw it on a chart like this a couple of years ago. However I quickly found nothing on the market made from it. Apparently it was pulled from the market. I don't know why. Toray industries than apparently introduced a series of polyurethane fabric but none appeared as breathable as Entrant or today's Event. I also looked at many of the others on the chart and most didn't impress me.

Event is a expanded PTFE membrane that has been treated so that body oils don't stick to it. I don't know how they did it but it did Solve the original problem Gortex had.

Today we can add Polartec Neoshell near Event on the bottom and apparently a vastly improved gortex pro shell. and maybe a few others scattered on the chart. However one thing remains the same. Most mono-film polyurethane breathable jackets do not breath nearly as well as event. But due to the light weight and low cost polyurethane remains popular.

Edited by Surf on 02/19/2014 00:35:49 MST.

hwc 1954
(wcollings) - M
Did they? on 02/19/2014 06:30:55 MST Print View

>> Event is a expanded PTFE membrane that has been treated so that body oils don't stick to it. I don't know how they did it but it did Solve the original problem Gortex had.

Did they?

I believe the original problem GoreTex had was not the ePTFE getting contaminated so it was clogged, but that the ePTFE membrane started disintegrating. How do eVent jackets hold up in the field? Are they sold in large enough numbers to know if the membrane is durable?

Marketing mumbo-jumbo aside, it appears that eVent has a DWR treatment applied to the ePTFE membrane. How long does the DWR treatment last?

Woubeir (from Europe)
(Woubeir) - F - MLife
Re: Did they? on 02/19/2014 06:49:27 MST Print View

It really was contamination.

And the DWR isn't any different or any different applied then in any other WPB-fabric.

hwc 1954
(wcollings) - M
eVent durability? on 02/19/2014 08:22:46 MST Print View

Yes. It was contamination, but as I understand it, the subsequent leakage was because the ePTFE membrane started to disintegrate. Do we know that this does not occur with eVent?

There are so few eVent jackets sold that it is hard to find large numbers of reviews. From that small sample, there are a lot of waterproofing failures reported along with admonitions that eVent has to be washed more frequently to keep it waterproof. Is it relying exclusively on the DWR for water resistance, as is the unprotected ePTFE membrane in Gore Windstopper?

Edited by wcollings on 02/19/2014 09:09:44 MST.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: eVent durability? on 02/19/2014 08:43:52 MST Print View

I have 2.5 layer eVent jacket. After a couple years (100 nights) it became discolored at shoulders and back of neck on hood. DWR quit working. I washed it and applied DWR and it seems much better, but I assume it's not good so I use something else now.

I think the 2.5 layer is especially bad. Body oils and dirt affect the membrane. Three layer (a seperate layer of fabric inside) might be better, but then its heavier.

They say DWR is required to make membrane work. So why not just have a DWR and forget the membrane?

I made M50 jacket and it seems pretty waterproof. Or M90 would work. I think maybe I'll get more sweaty though, not as breathable as eVent? I do get sweaty on back of neck and shoulders if I have hood up. Maybe the eVent was better. Maybe if it's really raining and I'm exercising then there is no way to stay dry with any material? I like the 5.5 ounces for a long jacket with pockets.

Woubeir (from Europe)
(Woubeir) - F - MLife
Re: Re: eVent durability? on 02/19/2014 09:57:56 MST Print View

It is not easy to get real disintegration of PTFE or ePTFE. So all those leakage reports might be a quality issue during production.
The leakage for original GTX (now Windstopper) was a consequence of contamination of the ePTFE-membrane, making it loose its hydrophobic properties, resulting in leakage. That's the main reason for including the PU-layer. eVent eliminates that by coating the interior of the ePTFE-layer with an oil/dirt-hating coating. Ih principle, 2,5- or 3-layer construction doesn't matter for waterproofness, but does for durability.

The DWR-treatment is a completely other point. While the ePTFE-layer in itself is extremely hydropopbobic, it is also very fragile, meaning it has to be covered by an outer protection layer (typically a nylon or polyester fabric). That 'protection layer' is only slightly hydrophobic and thus needs a DWR-treatment. The DWR only makes the fabric repel water (for a too short time; making a truly durable DWR was, is and will be the challenge), and certainly not waterproof. And it is thus not the extremely hydropopbobic that's covered by the DWR, but the 'protection layer'.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Re: eVent durability? on 02/19/2014 10:28:35 MST Print View

But Richard just said the M90 has 950 mmH2O, need 1500 mmH2O to be rainproof, maybe 950 is good enough.

When I take M50 and puddle water on the top of it 1/4 inch deep, for several days, there is no leakage. I've had M50 sleeping bag get wet from dew and the down inside absorbed no water.

Experienced people say that if it rains enough and you're exercising, eventually you'll get wet, even with best membranes

Maybe DWR is sufficient.

William Chilton
(WilliamC3) - MLife

Locale: Antakya
Re: eVent durability? on 02/19/2014 10:35:46 MST Print View

I have no personal experience with eVent, but I recently came across the following thread on the UKClimbing website: http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=578102.
I considered starting a new thread for it, but I think it fits here.

Woubeir (from Europe)
(Woubeir) - F - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: eVent durability? on 02/19/2014 11:35:06 MST Print View

"But Richard just said the M90 has 950 mmH2O, need 1500 mmH2O to be rainproof, maybe 950 is good enough.

When I take M50 and puddle water on the top of it 1/4 inch deep, for several days, there is no leakage. I've had M50 sleeping bag get wet from dew and the down inside absorbed no water."

True, but those are results from a static test. For real world conditions, you have to factor in dynamic conditions and aging. And I've once read a test wherin some fabrics had an initial HH of more then 5000 mm and after only 6 months UV-exposure it dropped to less then 1500 mm.

"Experienced people say that if it rains enough and you're exercising, eventually you'll get wet, even with best membranes"
Sure, I can even get wet if exercising intensely while wearing nothing. So you can then get everything wet.

"Maybe DWR is sufficient."
Well, sometimes I prefer my only water repellant windshell in rain (even if it's heavy), but as often (or even more) I'm glad to have a waterproof shell.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: eVent durability? on 02/19/2014 13:53:56 MST Print View

well said Woubeir

I'll continue using my M50 jacket and see how it does over time and conditions

I have an Epic jacket that seemed waterproof (although I'm not sure now) and then all of a sudden I noticed it provided almost no protection. I have to try cleaning and re-applying DWR

If I had to wash and re-apply DWR once a year that might be reasonable

hwc 1954
(wcollings) - M
DWR is DWR on 02/19/2014 14:42:40 MST Print View

>> The DWR-treatment is a completely other point.

Not really. If you read the GE eVent patent, the material they are using to coat all the internal nodes of the ePTFE membrane is -- drum roll -- the material that is widely used for making DWR treatments applied to fabric. eVent's patent is for the process of applying a DWR solution to an ePTFE membrane.

Hence my question: How long does this DWR applied to the ePTFE membrane last in the real world? If it were to break down (as DWR treatments on fabric do), then eVent becomes an unprotected ePFTE membrane (i.e. Gore-Tex Generation 1 or Gore-Tex Windstopper).

I don't know the answer. I'm not saying that eVent membranes don't last forever. Just saying... the instructions to wash frequently to preserve the water repellency raise a red flag to me.