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MYOG: A flexible frame for ultralight backpacks
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Maia Jordan
(maia) - MLife

Locale: Rocky Mountains
MYOG: A flexible frame for ultralight backpacks on 01/28/2014 20:34:12 MST Print View

Companion forum thread to:

MYOG: A flexible frame for ultralight backpacks

Jon Holthaus
(t25hatch) - M
Re: Pack on 01/29/2014 08:11:37 MST Print View

I also commented on your website, but I really like the adaptation to a single stay. With this cold weather I may have to sew one up this weekend to try it out. For what it's worth I am really digging the color scheme, it gives it some character (610 pack v2.0).

tony landrum
(landruma@aol.com) - MLife

Locale: Texas
MYOG: A flexible frame for ultralight backpacks on 01/29/2014 10:23:11 MST Print View

Very nice, thanks for sharing!
Tony

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
Re: Re: Pack on 01/29/2014 11:02:41 MST Print View

I was shocked at how much more I liked the arrangement detailed here than a more traditional, double stay rig. I tried the single stay back in the fall just because I thought I should, but within the month was tearing apart a double stay pack and rebuilding it into the green and blue pack shown above.

Jon, the pocket arrangement of the 610.2 pack has been great. I can cram enough stuff in to do an overnighter in sub-zero temps, but with only a shovel in the outer pocket it isn't overkill for a five hour ski trip.

Jon Holthaus
(t25hatch) - M
Re: 610.2 on 01/29/2014 11:56:31 MST Print View

Dave,
That's awesome to hear about the pocket. After putting it to use, would you change the closure on the pocket, or a minimum still wish you moved the 3/4" side release bucket 1.5"-2.0" lower as previously mentioned?

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
Re: Re: 610.2 on 01/29/2014 12:28:02 MST Print View

I ended up sewing a sleeve of gridstop all the way across the front of the pocket (about 7.5" long), which is just big enough to fit the buckle. This gets the job done. If I could do it over, I'd put said sleeve about 1.5" below the top of the pocket.

(Folks mystified by the thread drift can see more of the green and blue pack here: http://bedrockandparadox.com/2013/12/10/how-to-make-a-light-pack-610-pack-version-2/)

Jon Holthaus
(t25hatch) - M
Re: 610.2 on 01/29/2014 17:08:14 MST Print View

Excellent thank you.

Jason Elsworth
(jephoto) - M

Locale: New Zealand
MYOG: A flexible frame for ultralight backpack on 01/29/2014 22:28:28 MST Print View

Looks great and quite similar to the Exped Lightning. I am always surprised that more UL framed packs don't link the frame to the hipbelt in some way. My experience from the Exped Lightning is that it makes a significant difference.

All these pack articles from Dave C have really helped me to bring together my ideas and experiences from 30 plus years of using packs and often struggling to get a good fit. Thanks.

Greg Pehrson
(GregPehrson) - MLife

Locale: playa del caballo blanco
Re: MYOG: A flexible frame for ultralight backpack on 01/30/2014 05:30:07 MST Print View

Thanks, Dave. Great article with lots of helpful detail, and it's cool how generous you are in sharing your design and construction process, as I'm sure you could sell these packs if you wanted. I had been debating a pad sleeve on the inside or outside (in a stretchy mesh pocket, like GG) for a winter pack, and like your solution here, as it seems to both allow for easy access and not take away from durability. How much wrestling do you do to get the sit pad out/ back in when the pack is full, given the non-stretch of the cordura?

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: MYOG: A flexible frame for ultralight backpack on 01/30/2014 07:31:05 MST Print View

"All these pack articles from Dave C have really helped me..."

+1

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
Re: Re: MYOG: A flexible frame for ultralight backpack on 01/30/2014 08:17:36 MST Print View

Thanks everyone, I'm glad I can be useful. I've gotten plenty of inspiration here over the years.

Greg, one of the things I like about the solid fabric back is that it keeps snow out of the innards. The amount of wrestling with the pad depends on how stiff the foam is and how tight the fit. The more support you want from the foam, the more wrestling you'll have to do. You can always trim the pad a hair if it's too much.

Ian Clark
(chindits) - MLife

Locale: Cntrl ROMO
sharing the wealth on 01/30/2014 20:40:00 MST Print View

Thank you for sharing and your website is great.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Centraal stay on 02/01/2014 11:21:00 MST Print View

Interesting stay location. If it is custom contoured then it should be comfortable.

I like the contoured sides which place more load toward the upper half of the pack. Great fabric choices and good padding.

I've modded two hunting/backcountry ski packs with two contoured 1" aluminum stays connected at the top by a short aluminum support piece. The support piece takes a lot of the load of the pack and transfers it to the two vertical stays. The stays were bolted to the pack's framesheets and through the back fabric by melting the bolt holes with a hot spike.

BTW, in the last pack, a Camelback Commander, I cut off the usless cloth belt and slipped a padded REI Ridgeline belt behind the lumbar pad. My shoemaker bartacked the lumbar pad to take the load. NOW it can carry a load comfortably.

Edited by Danepacker on 02/01/2014 11:22:22 MST.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
Re: Centraal stay on 02/02/2014 10:33:11 MST Print View

The stay must be shaped to the user. With these packs I found contouring the whole length exactly to my back got the best results.

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Question about the Lumbar Pad on 02/15/2014 18:00:18 MST Print View

Hey David I'm working on a similar pack and would be very interested to know if you have any sketches of this? Also I'm really curious about the size of the lumbar area. It looks like the "lumbar pad" is kind of wide. Does that make is harder for the hipbelt to hug your hips or is there enough flex in the design for it to wrap snugly?

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
single stay update on 06/21/2014 08:27:30 MDT Print View

I've been using these packs quite a bit in the past four months, and have a further few thoughts.

I've never gotten along well with prominent lumbar pads, strongly preferring belts which contour consistently around my waist. I do think you need a lumbar pad of some kind with a suspension like this to avoid point pressure from the end of the stay. Thus, a softer foam pad (ridgerest is my favorite) combined with plenty of space on the sides of the sleeve for the belt to flex the foam around you seems to work best. I do think that even with a solid lumbar pad, point pressure from the stay will become an issue at bigger (~40 pounds) loads. Some plastic in the hipbelt might help there, but I think at those weights a different belt and suspension design is probably preferred.