Camp shoes
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victoria maki
(ENERGIZER) - MLife

Locale: Northern Minnesota
Camp shoes on 01/21/2014 09:53:43 MST Print View

I have been looking for a light weight shoe for both camp and stream crossings. I would not be hiking in them as I need orthotics. They need to be light, fast drying, lase type (narrow foot). Has anyone found shoes that would work?

Yak Attack
(Yak) - M

Locale: IN, USA
Crocs? on 01/21/2014 10:04:41 MST Print View

They don't have laces, but I've been taking a pair of crocs with me for stream crossings. They're light and durable, and don't stay wet at all.

Philip Tschersich
(Philip.AK) - F

Locale: Kodiak Alaska
Vivobarefoot on 01/21/2014 10:36:14 MST Print View

Vivobarefoot Ultras.

victoria maki
(ENERGIZER) - MLife

Locale: Northern Minnesota
re:camp shoes on 01/21/2014 11:31:41 MST Print View

Yak. I have tried crocs, but they are so wide on my skinny foot that they don't stay on in a river that is flowing. I have even tried using wide rubber bands with no luck. Thanks for the suggestion.
Phillip. They look better, but am I seeing the weight right? One shoe is 9.4 oz? I was hoping to get a tad littler. I will check them out though. Thanks for the info.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: re:camp shoes on 01/21/2014 11:36:03 MST Print View

94 grams?

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
RE: Vivobarefoot on 01/21/2014 11:42:04 MST Print View

Big +1 on the Vivobarefoots. People actually hike/run in them (so if something happens to your trail shoes, you could actually continue with these shoes!), they are extremely lightweight (that WAS 94 grams you saw -- they're made from a foam similar to Crocs), and they lace, so they'll stay on in stream crossings.

I love mine.

victoria maki
(ENERGIZER) - MLife

Locale: Northern Minnesota
re:camp shoe on 01/21/2014 11:42:27 MST Print View

Ah....94 grams. That's better. Thanks Phillip...

victoria maki
(ENERGIZER) - MLife

Locale: Northern Minnesota
re:camp shoes on 01/21/2014 12:05:26 MST Print View

I took a look at reviews. They most likely won't work. All the reviews are saying they run wide. If shoes don't have a N on them, they are always way to wide. It was worth a try...thanks everyone..

Philip Tschersich
(Philip.AK) - F

Locale: Kodiak Alaska
Kinda wide on 01/21/2014 12:25:48 MST Print View

They are sort of wide in the forefoot. They also run a little big overall since they are sized with the intention of using the sock-insert that some models ship with. They basically have a "Pure" model (with insert) and an "Ultrapure" model (sans insert). The model with the insert runs true to size, while the sans insert model ends up about 1 European size too large (in my experience). The sole is pretty paper thin and every twig or sharp rock pokes up through it. I can't imagine hiking in them unless you drop a burly insole in or are on a manicured trail. I use them as camp and river wading shoes, and they are great for that since you don't need a performance fit in those instances.

Edited by Philip.AK on 01/21/2014 12:27:01 MST.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Kinda wide on 01/21/2014 12:28:10 MST Print View

What is the purpose of the insert?

Philip Tschersich
(Philip.AK) - F

Locale: Kodiak Alaska
Insert on 01/21/2014 12:41:10 MST Print View

It is basically a rubber-soled fabric sock to improve the fit of the shoe for running in, I guess. The shoes would definitely benefit from the use of the inserts for wearing with bare feet but the inserts are fabric and would hold water, and add weight to the shoe that I don't need for my application (camp/river crossing), so I leave them at home. They also add to the price of the shoe, which are already pretty expensive for what they are.

Edited by Philip.AK on 01/21/2014 12:41:44 MST.

Lee Oz
(LeeOz) - F

Locale: NY
Insert on 01/21/2014 13:41:11 MST Print View

The idea behind the insert is also to prevent debris to find their way inside the shoe. I cannot comment on whether it does what it is supposed to.

. Kirby
(Kirby805) - F
RE: Camp shoes on 01/21/2014 15:01:44 MST Print View

Kmart flippy floppies - 7 ounces and $3.99/pair

Derek M.
(dmusashe) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Camp shoes on 01/21/2014 16:06:19 MST Print View

My advice would be to wear your shoes for stream crossings and save your camp shoes for camp/town. This is more a safety issue than a wetness issue, IMO. If your shoes won't dry fast enough after a stream crossing then you might want to reevaluate your shoe choice.

Of course, this is just my opinion. You might not agree.

As for camp shoes, I'd go with cheap flip flops (as mentioned previously), or some lightweight sliders (useful with socks).

By the way, has anyone found the lightest weight slider shoes out there? I'm on the hunt for a pair...

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: Re: Camp shoes on 01/21/2014 17:20:37 MST Print View

A myog slide would be lightest. Nike used to have the usurper which was very light.

Edited by jshann on 01/21/2014 17:27:36 MST.

Derek M.
(dmusashe) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Camp shoes on 01/22/2014 00:30:26 MST Print View

John,
I have made my own slides in the past which weighed about 2 ounces
Homemade slides

I wouldn't want to take them on a thru hike though, since they are not durable enough to be walked around in in town, and that is one of the main reasons to carry camp shoes to begin with on a thru hike.

I'm actually looking for a pair for a thru hike, which is why I brought that up...

The Under Armor UA Locker II Slides apparently weigh 8 ounces and cost $20.
http://www.underarmour.com/shop/us/en/mens-ua-locker-ii-slides/pid1238676-001

That's a little heavier than I wanted but maybe that's just about pushing the limits of a fully functioning pair of durable sandals. Not sure...

Edited by dmusashe on 01/22/2014 00:35:00 MST.

Philip Tschersich
(Philip.AK) - F

Locale: Kodiak Alaska
Stream crossings on 01/22/2014 01:29:51 MST Print View

The OP asked for footwear capable of camp use AND stream crossings (BTW- in my world, that's waist deep cold water with significant current). All the XUL duct tape and closed cell foam projects, while amusing, may not be entirely on topic.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: Camp shoes on 01/22/2014 05:09:32 MST Print View

THESE are definitely not cheap but they meet all your criteria and they are 2oz apiece or 4oz for the pair.

Pete Staehling
(staehpj1) - F
Cushe Slippers? on 01/22/2014 06:03:50 MST Print View

I like my Cushe Slippers and have used them as camp shoes, but for hiking I usually just wear my trail running shoes (Brooks Cascadias) day and night and even for water crossings. They dry fast enough and I wear socks that are OK when wet and dry quickly.

http://www.rei.com/product/848183/cushe-slipper-shoes-mens

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Camp shoes on 01/22/2014 09:00:13 MST Print View

I lost a Croc in a stream crossing when one foot got stuck in a rock and when I pulled up, off it came and merrily floated away in the current. I even had the backstrap in place, just for that reason. One Croc is a croc. My $400 camera took a bath too, on my second decent camera now. :(
Duane