Two layered down jackets?
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Kevin Burton
(burtonator) - F

Locale: norcal
Two layered down jackets? on 01/03/2014 14:57:22 MST Print View

I have two down jackets I could use (instead of spending $300-400 on a new one).

Would this be acceptable for normal Sierra winter conditions? Or do I need to invest in another one...

The gear is the biggest issue I'm having so far.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: Two layered down jackets? on 01/03/2014 14:59:23 MST Print View

take the amount of down in both and then compare it to a similar down jacket with the same fill weight

of course there may be a bit of compression, and itll end up being heavier

but itll work fine if you dont want to spend $$$$$

;)

Will Elliott
(elliott.will) - F

Locale: Juneau, AK
A on 01/05/2014 09:49:45 MST Print View

Go for it. It works with sleeping bags, too. No need to spend $$$

Bily Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: A on 01/05/2014 10:32:38 MST Print View

Yea, I'd do it. Though it is heavier because of double the shell material, it offers the advantage of layering... too warm, take off a layer.

Billy

Ito Jakuchu
(jakuchu) - MLife

Locale: Japan
Reply on 01/05/2014 18:47:28 MST Print View

I layer two jackets too rather than buy a third one that I get limited one season use from. To be honest although I like going very light, with all the weight from crampons, snow shoes in there, the weight difference of the extra shell material of the two layered jackets vs the one thicker jacket becomes less noticeable. So I see it that I pay a marginal weight penalty for a cheaper, and somewhat more flexible option.

Edited by jakuchu on 01/05/2014 18:55:57 MST.

Mitchell Rossman
(bigmitch)

Locale: Minneapolis-St. Paul
Layering of jackets on 01/06/2014 19:57:05 MST Print View

The practice of layering jackets is common for ice climbers on multi-pitch routes. It enables one to dial in the desired warmth.

For example, I use three jackets, all sized up from a Patagonia Nanopuff, Integral Design Rundle Jacket, and a Rab Alpine Generator.

One carries each of them in their own individual small stuff sacks attached to your harness.

Ito Jakuchu
(jakuchu) - MLife

Locale: Japan
e.g on 01/06/2014 23:24:28 MST Print View

For example, here is how I checked some options I was looking at.

down comparison

(the UL Down Guide Parka is the Front Smoke Parka in the US. except that the JP version has lighter shell material).

So my UL Light Down Parka + Light Alpine Parka have almost the same fill weight of FP800 down as the Rab Neutrino Endurance (221 vs 225gr), with a total weight penalty of 38gr. The two Montbell parkas are roughly $77 cheaper where I buy (Rab is relatively expensive while Montbell relatively cheap here).

Edited by jakuchu on 01/06/2014 23:30:36 MST.

Mitch Chesney
(MChesney) - F
Re: e.g on 01/07/2014 12:21:48 MST Print View

Ah, just be careful when measuring fill weights against products using differing fill powers. insulation = loft (and some other factors). A 900FP jacket with 150FW may offer the same insulation as a 800FP with 220FW, especially if it features boxed baffles.

Edited by MChesney on 01/07/2014 12:22:48 MST.

Ito Jakuchu
(jakuchu) - MLife

Locale: Japan
hence the columns in the matrix on 01/07/2014 16:18:54 MST Print View

Yeah, which is why I put the FW, FP and baffle construction in that matrix.
In my case I was most interested in comparing the Montbell Alpine Light layered over a UL Down Guide Parka (Front Smoke Parka) to a single Rab Neutrino. All of these have 800FP and sewn through baffles.

Would be interesting to know how FP800 compares to FP900 in fill weight to get same clo. And how practically humidity could change that relationship.

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: hence the columns in the matrix on 01/07/2014 17:45:28 MST Print View

As a ref point, my RAB Infinity Endurance size XL weighs precisely 493g w/o useless stuffsack.

Hence don't trust the accuracy of mfg's specs!