Day hiking list
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Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Day hiking list on 01/01/2014 12:09:13 MST Print View

Here's my typical day hiking list for above freezing day hikes. It's not much different than my multi-day list other than sleeping/cooking/shelter. I might add more insulation for shoulder seasons. There is emphasis on solo/self sufficient essential gear.

Day pack list

REI Stoke 29 backpack
Black Diamond Carbon Cork trekking poles
Z-seat sit pad
Nalgene Oasis canteen

iPhone 4 with Gaia GPS app
Brunton 26 compass
Greentrails maps
Digital point and shoot camera

Survival lanyard/keychain:
Mini firesteel
Leatherman Style CS multi tool
Bison Designs spy capsule with Tinder Quick tabs
Olight i2 AA LED flashlight
Fox 40 whistle

Other essentials:
Benchmade Griptilian knife
Fenix h21 headlamp
Spare AA battery
Native Dash XP sunglasses
AMK .3 first aid kit with added meds, upgraded compresses
K&M match case with compass and REI/UCO storm matches
Sawyer Mini water filter
4x Micro Pur tablets
AMK Heatsheet bivy bag
"Hotel freebie" sewing kit
Flat pack duct tape
20' nylon line
Single use super glue

Spare clothing:
GoLite poncho (sub with OR Panorama rain jacket for expected all day rain)
Sierra Designs rain pants (per season/conditions)
OR Versaliner gloves
Ibex beanie
Patagonia R1 jacket or vest, per season/conditions
Patagonia Houdini windshirt
Bandana
OR spring headnet

Sunday Afternoons Adventure hat
-or-
OR Seattle Sombrero rain hat

Hygiene kit:
Small zippered bag
Roll end TP flattened in ziplock sandwich baggie
Small vial Dr Bronners soap
Small bottle Alcohol gel hand cleaner
Small vial REI 100% DEET
Small bottle sunscreen
Montbell Ti Handy Scoop trowel

Spare food: granola bars

If cooking:
MSR Titan Ti cup with roaster foil lid
Esbit Ti wing stove
Foil windscreen
Maple Fire folding Ti spoon

Edited by dwambaugh on 01/01/2014 23:38:07 MST.

Brian Johns
(bcutlerj) - M

Locale: NorCal
Great list. on 01/01/2014 13:07:39 MST Print View

Nice thing about day trips is it's not so tough to add in luxury items or weight. You're not carrying two or five days of food and/or water. I might suggest, though, however convenient, I would maybe rethink the two knives and two lights. Redundancy has its place, but you are not really likely to even need the first light on a day hike, and the grip-tillian will likely open a granola bar as well as a leatherman. It will also help you make a splint or lean-to much better. Just my $0.02. The extra weight of a headlamp and leatherman might e with it from a training perspective if nothing else.

Edited by bcutlerj on 01/01/2014 13:08:49 MST.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Great list. on 01/01/2014 13:50:13 MST Print View

I go with a spare set of batteries for my Petzl headlamp and then a LED keychain light as my back up.

my summer day hike list.
http://www.geargrams.com/list?id=16671

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: redundancy on 01/01/2014 15:48:51 MST Print View

"Nice thing about day trips is it's not so tough to add in luxury items or weight. You're not carrying two or five days of food and/or water. I might suggest, though, however convenient, I would maybe rethink the two knives and two lights. Redundancy has its place, but you are not really likely to even need the first light on a day hike, and the grip-tillian will likely open a granola bar as well as a leatherman. It will also help you make a splint or lean-to much better. Just my $0.02. The extra weight of a headlamp and leatherman might e with it from a training perspective if nothing else."

The redundant tools and lights are part of my multi-day kit too. I keep all the small items in a one liter stuff sack that is easily transferred from day pack to multi-day kit. If that stuff sack is in my pack, I know I have all the critical goodies without going through a checklist. Same with my hygiene kit.


I do go out out solo a lot and this stuff is my insurance policy. Indeed, I carry more than the iconic SUL single edge razor blade and Photon light. I am quite conscious of the choice and comfortable with it. I carry a pocket knife plus SAK Classic and a AAA flashlight as part of my every day carry, so this bit is like my normal pocket load and I do like my toys. As it is, the flashlight is 1.8oz and the Leatherman adds 1.6oz. Seeing that the pair are roughly 1/1000 of my body weight, I think can handle it :)

My lighting strategy is to have two lights that both use a single AA battery. That prevents all the juggling with trying to replace three AAA batteries and carrying spares. I can swap the AA between lights if needed, plus the spare. With a single AA battery, it is possible to change a battery in complete darkness, which would be entertaining with three AAA's and getting the polarity right, let alone dropping one. I considered standardizing on single AAA battery lights but I liked performance/weight/cost of the AA models.

I totally agree about day hikes having a training aspect and the tendency for toys to creep in. Definitely the time I would haul an SLR and tripod. I see that need to add a camera to my list.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: aaa batteries on 01/01/2014 16:02:55 MST Print View

"which would be entertaining with three AAA's and getting the polarity right,"

Haha.. that happened to my dad 2 years ago on a car camping overnight when his headlamp batteries died and he had to swap them out. luckily for him there are only 2 combinations. (-)(+)(-) or (+)(-)(+). key is to put the dead ones away so they don't get mixed in with the good ones.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: aaa batteries on 01/01/2014 16:17:04 MST Print View

Yeah, fumbling around in the dark trying to replace batteries implies that you need the light.

I see the lights as tools that my life could depend on, not just tent lights for reading. That's why I gave up on Photons and Petz e+ headlamps--- light for sure, but kinda weak. I put them in the stupid light category for my use. If you are in deep forest with heavy overcast, there simply is no light. It's very different than above tree line with a clear sky and moonlight.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Re: Re: aaa batteries on 01/01/2014 17:11:28 MST Print View

which is why i have my Tikka XP+ with the CORE battery. then an spare set. and a LED light in case i need to change the batteries :)

my last day hike, solo around the main outer loop.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v115/Socjake/Hiking/Owlshead.jpg

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Multi-purposing on 01/01/2014 17:14:57 MST Print View

>"Yeah, fumbling around in the dark trying to replace batteries implies that you need the light."

For replacing batteries in a light, I carry a single Wint-O-Green Life Saver and utilize the triboluminescence when I bite down on it. (Wint-O-Green Life Savers produce more visible light because the wintergreen flavoring, methyl salicylate, is fluorescent).

And if I'm out that late, the 10 Calories is helpful.

Glenn S
(Glenn64) - M

Locale: Snowhere, MN
Re: Day hiking list on 02/10/2014 23:31:08 MST Print View

Funny how out of that entire list, the focus is on knives and lights, imagine that lol

On that note, I'd say that as minimalist as the photon is, I wouldn't leave home without one! Then changing batts is a nonissue, whether it be a Surefire, Fenix, Maratac, ITP, or whatever.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Re: Day hiking list on 02/13/2014 16:54:06 MST Print View

You definitley want to add a down puffy jacket. This is a must, if you get trapped and are forced to sleep overnight it might keep you alive.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Day hiking list on 02/13/2014 19:11:19 MST Print View

Note my opening paragraph where I wrote, "I might add more insulation for shoulder seasons."

I'm usually in forest and below 6000' in the Western Cascades and Olympics. I'm thinking an overnight low of no more than 40F with the basic list using the R1 fleece extra layer. I also have a windshirt, rain jacket/and pants plus a space blanket bivy sack, as well as light gloves and beanie. Not a comfortable night at 40F, but definitely survivable.

At anything approaching that expected low, I have a 100g vest or puffy in the gear quiver to add. The vest plus long sleeve R1, windshirt and rain gear would be plenty for an overnight down to freezing and survivable well below that. I don't use down as a habit :)

If I am ambulatory enough to gather fuel, I have redundant fire starters too. Pretty cozy at that point. I can't count on that, ergo all the layers on the list.

Comfortable camping is a whole other order of things, with shelter and a fat sleeping bag.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Re: Day hiking list on 02/15/2014 06:31:18 MST Print View

Yeah I just sort of skimmed the post sorry. I do feel like a hooded down puffy is very warm for its weight compared to your R1 or any of the other clothing. even in the summer while day hiking I think everyone should add a down puffy just in case they need to spend the night.

I like your golite poncho, dont like the rain pants unless you truly need them.
I would nix the multitool and keep the Benchmade.
Nix trowel.
Nix heavy Nalgeen, use plastic bottles.
I would add a Mountain house meal aka real food for emergency that you can ration out if needed.
I think a 1/8th ccf pad would be nice to lay on to take naps etc.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Day hiking list on 02/15/2014 09:36:19 MST Print View

I like your golite poncho, dont like the rain pants unless you truly need them.
I would nix the multitool and keep the Benchmade.
Nix trowel.
Nix heavy Nalgeen, use plastic bottles.
I would add a Mountain house meal aka real food for emergency that you can ration out if needed.
I think a 1/8th ccf pad would be nice to lay on to take naps etc.

Rain pants on days where rain is expected. I'm in the PNW.

The multi tool is tiny and more scissors than anything. Nothing like my Leatherman Wave and a deliberate redundancy. You might find me with a Victorinox Classic plus a folder, which I EDC in town. I like Mora knives too.

The soil is rocky here and the trowel is part of my standard hygiene/latrine kit and adds 1.4oz

The Nalgene Oasis is something I picked up in a thrift store and I've been using for several months. They are 4oz and I just like the design. The canteen shape rides very well in a side pocket. If I was loading up for a multi-day and looking for weight savings, it would be an easy target. My day hiking gear gets much more use and durability is a good thing.

How would I deal with a mountain house meal without all the other ephemera? Cold rehydration? A couple energy bars would be more practical. You need the sugar more than protein in the the short term.

I do have a sit pad plus pack for ground insulation, plus evergreen boughs in an emergency. I would bring my UL hammock for naps--- very nice on a hot summer day. Makes a nice chair too.

A down puffy is just useless for me. I definitely would add a synthic puffy for less than summer conditions. The fleece would actually get used for day hikes and is a wet weather winner. The conditions I encounter are cool humid and wet vs cold.