Forum Index » Food, Hydration, and Nutrition » Pineapple vs Authentic CCK Cleaver and Excalibur Dehydrator (Video by Critter)


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Critter Hampton
(TheCritter)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Pineapple vs Authentic CCK Cleaver and Excalibur Dehydrator (Video by Critter) on 12/24/2013 15:35:06 MST Print View

Here's my latest and second cooking show for hikers. I munch these in the backcountry. I snip them, with the scissors in my tiny Leatherman and add them to meals at camp when I want to sweeten a dish or make it less spicy. I like to dry my food to a crisp, and if I wouldn't have been so wild with my CCK cleaver I could have made smaller, faster drying, slices. This is what I do for fun and entertainment. Click on this link.

Edited by TheCritter on 12/25/2013 18:41:47 MST.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Well done. on 12/26/2013 10:13:03 MST Print View

Well done.

I would expect some browning over time, unless you pretreated the standard ways (ascorbic acid, sulfur, etc).

My cutting procedure is way more time consuming, I'm fanatical about trying to get all the slices the same thickness. But your way is much more time efficient!

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Pineapple vs Authentic CCK Cleaver and Excalibur Dehydrator (Video by Critter) on 12/26/2013 12:48:24 MST Print View

Where is John Belushi?

You need a guest appearance by the Samurai Chef.

--B.G.--

Edited by --B.G.-- on 12/26/2013 13:34:33 MST.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Pineapple vs Authentic CCK Cleaver and Excalibur Dehydrator (Video by Critter) on 12/26/2013 13:18:11 MST Print View

I think Critter was performing for video : )

That looked like a sharp knife, and it's heavy so it goes through pineapple easily

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Pineapple vs Authentic CCK Cleaver and Excalibur Dehydrator (Video by Critter) on 12/26/2013 13:28:48 MST Print View

I'll admit it. I counted your fingers.

Critter Hampton
(TheCritter)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Thanks on 01/06/2014 19:41:51 MST Print View

Yeah the knife play was for theatrics and I don't slice like that when no ones looking. Thanks for the unexpected comments, I came here from another forum where people weren't as nice. Many of the trips I do are considered "too extreme" by city folk so I figure I'll just start out in the cooking section to see how it goes. My problem has been that people say I'm bragging when I tell them what I'm doing, but when I down play what I'm doing they say I need to be telling people how dangerous and difficult it is. So thank you for the surprisingly warm welcome to the forum.

Edited by TheCritter on 01/06/2014 19:43:32 MST.

Ryan Slack
(RWSlack) - F - M

Locale: Minnesota
pineapple technique on 01/06/2014 20:09:27 MST Print View

Dried pineapple is my favorite breakfast accompaniment for hot or cold cereal. Good job!

When I worked in a grocery store a Filipino woman showed me how to quickly "chunk" a pineapple, and it's a bit safer and more even...using a large chef's knife.

Cut off top and bottom, stand fruit upright.
Quarter and core fruit, leaving skin on.
Lay quarters skin-side down on cutting board, make a lengthwise ("north to south") cut in each down to but not through the skin.
Slice "east-west" perpendicular to your last cut as thin/thick as you want the slices to be, using your knuckles as a guide. Again, not all the way through the skin.
Last, "fillet" the chunks with your quarters still skin-side down by making two slices, one from each side toward your center cut.

Whole pineapple takes less than a minute for me now, being careful. That's after plenty of practice going faster with a workplace-mandated Kevlar glove on the left hand.

Mark Ries
(mtmnmark) - M

Locale: IOWAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
Re: Pineapple vs Authentic CCK Cleaver and Excalibur Dehydrator (Video by Critter) on 01/21/2014 09:10:03 MST Print View

I like your videos Mr Critter. I have found if you sort through to find the moist pieces that you can cut tear or smoosh the wet pieces and that helps them dry faster. Cutting thin to begin with also helps