Forum Index » GEAR » When to carry/wear a Short Sleeve shirt?


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Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
When to carry/wear a Short Sleeve shirt? on 12/17/2013 20:40:08 MST Print View

Is there any good reason to carry or wear a short sleeve shirt, whether knit or woven or base? Or is a long sleeve shirt usually a better choice?

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
dodge ball! on 12/17/2013 20:54:08 MST Print View

When you are playing skins vs shirts dodgeball. 'Natch

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Personal preference on 12/17/2013 21:57:53 MST Print View

Of course, some will tell you that they like them.

But no, I think sun protection plus bug protection plus the flexibility of rolling up your sleeves makes LS the "best" choice.

I'm bracing for a firestorm...

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: west coast best coast
Re: When to carry/wear a Short Sleeve shirt? on 12/17/2013 22:03:02 MST Print View

Hiking in a mostly shaded area in warm weather, the short sleeve will be cooler. Actually going shirtless would be even cooler. I would go shirtless more often if pack straps didn't rub shoulders uncomfortably, sometimes it's just so much more practical to not wear a base layer.
In direct sun long sleeve is generally better.

I almost always wear a long sleeve button up shirt. Cotton for hot weather, polycotton for warm weather, and nylon for cold/wet weather. I keep the sleeves rolled up 75% of the time and roll them back down when I need sun protection or protection from brush.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Re: Personal preference on 12/17/2013 22:10:10 MST Print View

> But no, I think sun protection plus bug protection plus the flexibility of rolling up your sleeves makes LS the "best" choice.

Well, that's what I'm thinking. I purchased several SS knit shirts for 'packing, and I'm thinking I won't end up using any of them. Seems that either I want to be warm, or I want the protection from the sun/bugs/brush. I bought 'em, but I don't think they were the best purchase I've made...

Edited by Bolster on 12/17/2013 22:11:34 MST.

hwc 1954
(wcollings) - M
short sleeve on 12/17/2013 22:12:45 MST Print View

I always wear a short sleeve tech t-shirt for hiking when it's 60 degrees (F) or warmer. I can always put a long sleeve shirt on over it if I were to get cold.

I want the sun. In NH, it's almost impossible to get enough due to the latitude. If the bugs are flying, I'm going to wear bug spray anyway, so putting some on my arms is no big deal.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: short sleeve on 12/18/2013 01:51:23 MST Print View

Most of the year I hike in a Rail Riders Eco-Speed T and Patagonia Baggies. A Houdini or Poncho covers the bad weather. This year through spring, summer, and fall I did trips in the Sierras, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Rhode Island and a few other states and I didn't see enough bugs/mosquitoes to be a problem. I think they must be an urban legend :)

Alaska and Minnesota might be a different story.

As for the other thread on shorts and cancer... I don't understand the fear of shorts.

AT

I do adhere to Fletcher's "Second Law of Thermodynamic Walking: Give your balls some air," whenever possible.

Had to edit this, since I spilled a Diet Pepsi on my keyboard the the Shift key is sticking.

Edited by ngatel on 12/18/2013 01:55:03 MST.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
ss on 12/18/2013 05:52:58 MST Print View

Long sleeves work best in low humidity places with lots of intense sun.

You will want short sleeves where there is humidity and shade.

On the AT I wear short sleeves down to about 50, and just put fleece on when stop

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
insects on 12/18/2013 06:37:56 MST Print View

As an East Coaster by birth, and Rhode Island in particular, I have to say the insects in the thick of summer can be awful. Black flies in mosquitoes in northern New England in June? Egads!

But ticks in particular can be worrisome.

Lyme disease is a real concern, even more so than when I moved away from there 15 yrs ago.


I'd actually be more concerned about ticks on my legs than sun exposure from wearing evil, nasty shorts here in Colorado. ;)

Lyme, CT is where the name Lyme disease originated after all....



**** Really..you went hiking in RI? Not many people do. Curious where you went? Went hiking back there on a recent family visit and hit the start of peak foliage season. Rather nice.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
LS vs SS on 12/18/2013 10:13:03 MST Print View

> Long sleeves work best in low humidity places with lots of intense sun. You will want short sleeves where there is humidity and shade.

Well, that puts a lid on the issue for me. I'm a southwest desert rat. Sun and dry, not much shade.

In my defense, I'd gotten the SS primarily for duty as a base layer. But recently, on one warm hike, I took off my LS shirt and hiked in the SS because it was convenient. End of the trip my arms were way more brown than I like them. So I need to exercise some discipline and keep those LS shirts on. I'm going to put this into effect by simply not carrying any SS shirts.

That'll teach me.

BJ Clark
(bj.clark) - MLife

Locale: Colorado
Colin Fletcher's 2nd law of thermodynamic walking on 12/18/2013 10:13:49 MST Print View

He was the man! Whenever I get to obsessed with gear and tech I pull out and read his stuff. The guy used a one compartment pack when he went to an internal frame,a plastic tarp and an ensolite pad! My oldest son is named for him. As to the shorts, I almost always hike in baggy shorts that I can put something under or over as needed. Currently using a long baggy Golite short with the liner cut out!

Forgot the original intent of this thread after reading Nick's post! Unless I know it is going to be cooler I prefer a s/s shirt as my bottom most layer. I carry a long sleeve shirt and wind shirt as well so if I need to I can layer or wear either shirt singly. Spending a lot of time above treeline, weather, biting insects can influence my choices but my first choice is almost always a s/s shirt.

Edited by bj.clark on 12/18/2013 13:17:22 MST.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: insects on 12/18/2013 11:06:47 MST Print View

Paul,

Did a good part of Mid State Trail and then down to the North South Trail in RI last June. Actually you could hike through the entire states of Rhode Island and Massachusetts on these trails. I just did a short section in RI, as some of the trail requires road walking. Camping is not allowed in most places, but use your imagination :)

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: LS vs SS on 12/18/2013 11:08:05 MST Print View

Why even wear a shirt when the weather is nice?

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
NST on 12/18/2013 11:23:21 MST Print View

I meant to do the NST when I lived there. The one time I was going to, it was hot, muggy and my buddy and I said "the hell with it". :)

My wife and I did a (very brief) stretch in the Arcadia Management Area when we visited this past October:

Beach Pond

To get end the thread-jack:

re: Why wear a shirt if the weather is nice?

Personally, I would not want to scare people! ;)

I thought this was a joke thread a first (guess not!), but I often wear a short sleeve for day hikes. Long sleeves for multiple days as I do not like wearing sun screen. Clogs the pores, picks up dirt and feels "icky" on long term trips.

If I was back East in the southern Appalachians, I'd probably do short sleeves.

Edited by PaulMags on 12/18/2013 11:35:14 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: LS vs SS on 12/18/2013 13:45:32 MST Print View

"Why even wear a shirt when the weather is nice?"

Nick, didn't you wear a shirt when you got married?

--B.G.--

Edward Jursek
(nedjursek@gmail.com) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
SS Shirt on 12/18/2013 15:49:44 MST Print View

I hike in SS Ibex Echo with the zipper. I find that when I roll up the sleeves of a LS shirt it makes my arms warmer and is uncomfortable. I use a combo sun tan/bug lotion so insects are not an issue.

Clayton Black
(Jivaro) - MLife
Re: SS vs LS on 12/18/2013 16:04:04 MST Print View

If you have 'guns' you wear SS under any and all conditions.

Otherwise use LS and roll them up.

I wear LS.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Re: Re: SS vs LS on 12/18/2013 16:08:59 MST Print View

> If you have 'guns' you wear SS under any and all conditions.

Ha ha! Well, good point, actually. My contractor, who has massive biceps and triceps muskles, wears nothing but sleeveless at all times, even when he's shivering with cold.

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Re: Re: SS vs LS on 12/18/2013 17:34:42 MST Print View

Get a set of arm warmers and leave your angsts behind. Combined with the SS shirt it will probably still be lighter in weight too than the typical LS shirt.

Dustin Short
(upalachango) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: SS vs LS on 12/18/2013 18:50:55 MST Print View

Maybe you're typical LS Rick, but not my dead bird Phase SL!

But yeah, for the most part I wear a LS year round due to either cold or dry and hot conditions. Now if I was in the midwest or southeast the SS may come out, although I'd probably stick to a looser fitting LS that lets me roll and button up the sleeves (like my ex-officio ASL shirt).

One place I'm considering wearing a SS is as my next to skin in winter. Still toying with the idea, but I could use a merino SS to maintain odor control and then something heavier like a cap4 hoody for overall warmth. This has the benefit of reducing the number of tight/trim layers around my elbows so I don't feel any restriction of movement...but convenience says I'll probably still stick with a LS base layer.