Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread.
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michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/16/2013 07:19:12 MST Print View

I'm in the market for a watch, I wear them often in the city but don't have one for hiking yet.

As the title states, post a picture if you can and tell us a little about it.

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Didn't like Suunto, now use Casio on 12/16/2013 08:16:46 MST Print View

I was gifted a $300 Suunto watch. the heart rate monitor failed often, in that mode it drained the battery fast. the compass had to be calibrated EVERY time, doing the 'spin in a circle' bee dance. The altimeter and temp were Suunto degrees, as other Suunto owners know, are +/-5 degrees off than real temp. the battery replacement process was supposed to be coin instead of screw driver, but the weak plastic disintegrated.

I decided to get something else. enter the affordable indestructable Casio:
Casio Stainless-Steel Altimeter, Barometer, and Thermometer Watch
Casio

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Casio-Stainless-Steel-Altimeter-Barometer-and-Thermometer-Watch/15075155

it also comes in cloth wrist band, but I like the stainless steel because the polyester cloth one smell when you stink ;)

the Altimeter is accurate within 200 ft, the indiglo night light is useful as I often start in the dark. for under $50 the battery lasts forever. they make other Casio's that the battery auto recharges by movement or solar, I'm not a doomsday prepper, and I'm OK with changing the battery once every 10 years. Casio - you complete me.

I also have many scuba watches, and travel vibrating alarm watches.

Edited by RogerDodger on 12/16/2013 08:24:16 MST.

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/16/2013 10:35:01 MST Print View

I know at least 4 people who have Suuntos They all hate them.

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Timex Indiglo on 12/16/2013 10:45:15 MST Print View

Timex Indiglo.

It tells the time. It tells the date. It glows in the dark.first flat


It is on my left wrist. Good for dead reckoning. And knowing when the post-trip happy hour is about to start.

Edited by PaulMags on 12/16/2013 10:46:54 MST.

Ryan Smith
(ViolentGreen) - F

Locale: Southeast
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/16/2013 10:47:19 MST Print View

Casio Pathfinder for me when on the trail.

Ryan

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Timex Indiglo on 12/16/2013 10:49:13 MST Print View

Where'd you get that picture of Dukakis?

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Timex Indiglo on 12/16/2013 11:14:44 MST Print View

Shorter, ethnic looking-guy with thick eye brows?

Check!

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Timex Indiglo on 12/16/2013 11:19:27 MST Print View

I was talking about the helmet......

Dan Durston
(dandydan) - M

Locale: Cascadia
Watch on 12/16/2013 11:48:52 MST Print View

casio

I use the Casio PAW1300. It's much like a lot of their altimeter watches, but it's the "slim" design which is less bulky on the wrist (although it's still a fair size). I've been using mine for ~3 years without any troubles. I like it because it's solar powered and the altimeter works very well. At $140 on eBay it's affordable.

Casio also makes the PAW2000 which is basically the same thing but with a higher res display for more money.

hwc 1954
(wcollings) - M
Garmin Forerunner 610 on 12/16/2013 12:07:08 MST Print View

I wear a Garmin Forerunner 610 GPS watch. It can be set up to display all kinds of stuff, but for hiking, I show time of day, elapsed time, distance, elevation, and heart rate (as a % of my max). I also display lap time and lap distance, starting a new lap at the summit or turnaround point.

Garmin Forerunner

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Watch on 12/16/2013 12:49:19 MST Print View

Every time this subject comes up, the Suunto haters jump at the chance to disparage a well-made piece of useful equipment.
It does what it does, as well or better than comparable or lesser priced watches.
I use mine as an Altimeter/Barometer/ and time piece. When use by a competent person who understands the usages and limitations of this kind of equipment, it becomes a very valuable tool.

You don’t buy a watch for:
1. Use as a compass, get a real compass, there is no substitute for it.
2. Thermometer, though mine is very accurate while not on my wrist (body warmth effects it while wearing) I would take a real thermometer if I needed readings during the day.

I like it so well I have 2

Suunto2

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Re: Re: Watch on 12/16/2013 13:50:03 MST Print View

@Tad Englund,

I'm glad you have success with your Suunto.

Most of the BPL people have significant experience with their tools and not incompetent newbies.

A statement like this is trolling and looking to bait for a flame thread:

"You don’t buy a watch for:
1. Use as a compass, get a real compass, there is no substitute for it."

No one said we don't have a physical compass. It seems that every electronic product now has an e-compass, altimeter, and thermometer or app for that. in comparison against other products handheld GPS compass/alt/therm, wrist watch compass/alt/therm, Smartphone compass/alt, and of course physical compass, and thermometer - We know how to care, configure, calibrate, maintain the gear. We have read the manual too :-) The Suunto brand is the one with the highest occurence of deviation among the other metrics.

if it was an $8 item from a thrift store, we would have low expectation, but for a high end premium cost product, that is not acceptable to many. It's not a coincidence that every scuba dive trip, 5 out of 30 people are using Suunto watches, their temp degrees vary from the other 25 divers. It's so predictable that we all know Celcius degrees, farenheit degrees, and theirs is called Suunto Degrees, that a person has to compensate for it.

Either all the other e-brands (Seiko, citizen, garmin, magellan, Casio, etc) are incorrect, including a classic physical compass and a physical thermometer, or the obvious exception is that Suunto is too stubborn to review their algorythms.

You say your Suunto device is working out for you, glad to hear that. I wish you success.

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Watch (out) on 12/16/2013 14:25:41 MST Print View

Roger, thank you for taking the bait, I was having a slow Monday and needed something to wake me up.
BTW, I had 3 Suunto Core's but gave one away to my son in law. Yes I like them, but I also understand their limitations as well as the limitations of all the other options out there. For me the Core looks/works the best.



I figured you would be the one taking the bait, and appreciate your reponse and the diversion from my Monday scheduling/paperwork.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread on 12/16/2013 14:50:25 MST Print View

I LOVE my Casio.
Casio Pathfinder
The only item that has been with me on every hike since I bought it.
The thermometer and altimeter work for me as does the alarm and night light
I even made a You Tube video with it of an event that I will never see happening again :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzqPzV6cFSQ

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
The reverse approach. on 12/16/2013 15:08:52 MST Print View

Rather that tolerate a mediocre altimeter within a functional watch, I go for great altimeter and accept some inconveniences as a timepiece:

Thommen wirstwatch

The batteries never need replacing, as there aren't any. The display has no lower temp limit, and the duct-tape watchband can be used for repairs or first-aid situations.

For use as a timepiece, you simply hang it from a 6.2 meter string and each period of the pendulum is 5 seconds long. For long periods, simply place it in the ground, and mark its shadow every 15 degrees for each hour.

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: The reverse approach. on 12/16/2013 15:27:28 MST Print View

David nice durable band, but isn’t the last layer a real pain to get off when you have to rip it off your arm hair?
For some of the younger set here you might want to explain what thing is on top of your wrist is (hooked to the duct tape).



Good thing you don’t need a slide rule for the explanation

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: The reverse approach. on 12/16/2013 15:52:26 MST Print View

>"but isn’t the last layer a real pain to get off when you have to rip it off your arm hair?"

Ah, but that is also weight-saving. I can leave my razor at home.

For the younger set. Just a few years ago, at your 5th birthday party, you used one of these party favors:blow-up party favor

When the air pressure inside the coiled tube is low, the coil is contracted. When the air pressure is greater inside the coiled tube, it expands (you blow in it, it moves).

If you made such a coiled tube out of metal, sealed some air inside and through gears magnified that movement to move a needle around on a dial, you'd have created an altimeter. These Thommen alitmeters are graduated in 20-foot intervals, but you can read them to 5 feet. They are sensitive enough that I can see the needle move if I crack the car windows as I'm driving down the road.

I always wanted to create an altimeter using an expanding bag of Cheetios, inside a cigar box, pushing a paper clip of the box (which would be calibrated in feet of altitude) with a rubber band to return the needle upon descent. Then the Unabomber came on the scene, caused many of us at UC Berkeley delays for security at the computer science building, and increased the suspicions about home-made pressure switches.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Didn't like Suunto, now use Casio on 12/16/2013 16:31:01 MST Print View

"the Altimeter is accurate within 200 ft"

Hopefully this is a typo?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Didn't like Suunto, now use Casio on 12/16/2013 16:35:23 MST Print View

"the Altimeter is accurate within 200 ft"

I think this is called setting the bar pretty low. Pun intended.

--B.G.--

rOg w
(rOg_w) - F - M

Locale: rogwilmers.wordpress
deleted on 12/16/2013 17:46:19 MST Print View

deleted

Edited by rOg_w on 01/16/2014 21:29:02 MST.