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michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/16/2013 07:19:12 MST Print View

I'm in the market for a watch, I wear them often in the city but don't have one for hiking yet.

As the title states, post a picture if you can and tell us a little about it.

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Didn't like Suunto, now use Casio on 12/16/2013 08:16:46 MST Print View

I was gifted a $300 Suunto watch. the heart rate monitor failed often, in that mode it drained the battery fast. the compass had to be calibrated EVERY time, doing the 'spin in a circle' bee dance. The altimeter and temp were Suunto degrees, as other Suunto owners know, are +/-5 degrees off than real temp. the battery replacement process was supposed to be coin instead of screw driver, but the weak plastic disintegrated.

I decided to get something else. enter the affordable indestructable Casio:
Casio Stainless-Steel Altimeter, Barometer, and Thermometer Watch
Casio

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Casio-Stainless-Steel-Altimeter-Barometer-and-Thermometer-Watch/15075155

it also comes in cloth wrist band, but I like the stainless steel because the polyester cloth one smell when you stink ;)

the Altimeter is accurate within 200 ft, the indiglo night light is useful as I often start in the dark. for under $50 the battery lasts forever. they make other Casio's that the battery auto recharges by movement or solar, I'm not a doomsday prepper, and I'm OK with changing the battery once every 10 years. Casio - you complete me.

I also have many scuba watches, and travel vibrating alarm watches.

Edited by RogerDodger on 12/16/2013 08:24:16 MST.

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/16/2013 10:35:01 MST Print View

I know at least 4 people who have Suuntos They all hate them.

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Timex Indiglo on 12/16/2013 10:45:15 MST Print View

Timex Indiglo.

It tells the time. It tells the date. It glows in the dark.first flat


It is on my left wrist. Good for dead reckoning. And knowing when the post-trip happy hour is about to start.

Edited by PaulMags on 12/16/2013 10:46:54 MST.

Ryan Smith
(ViolentGreen) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/16/2013 10:47:19 MST Print View

Casio Pathfinder for me when on the trail.

Ryan

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Timex Indiglo on 12/16/2013 10:49:13 MST Print View

Where'd you get that picture of Dukakis?

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Timex Indiglo on 12/16/2013 11:14:44 MST Print View

Shorter, ethnic looking-guy with thick eye brows?

Check!

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Timex Indiglo on 12/16/2013 11:19:27 MST Print View

I was talking about the helmet......

Dan Durston
(dandydan)

Locale: Cascadia
Watch on 12/16/2013 11:48:52 MST Print View

casio

I use the Casio PAW1300. It's much like a lot of their altimeter watches, but it's the "slim" design which is less bulky on the wrist (although it's still a fair size). I've been using mine for ~3 years without any troubles. I like it because it's solar powered and the altimeter works very well. At $140 on eBay it's affordable.

Casio also makes the PAW2000 which is basically the same thing but with a higher res display for more money.

hwc 1954
(wcollings) - M
Garmin Forerunner 610 on 12/16/2013 12:07:08 MST Print View

I wear a Garmin Forerunner 610 GPS watch. It can be set up to display all kinds of stuff, but for hiking, I show time of day, elapsed time, distance, elevation, and heart rate (as a % of my max). I also display lap time and lap distance, starting a new lap at the summit or turnaround point.

Garmin Forerunner

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Watch on 12/16/2013 12:49:19 MST Print View

Every time this subject comes up, the Suunto haters jump at the chance to disparage a well-made piece of useful equipment.
It does what it does, as well or better than comparable or lesser priced watches.
I use mine as an Altimeter/Barometer/ and time piece. When use by a competent person who understands the usages and limitations of this kind of equipment, it becomes a very valuable tool.

You don’t buy a watch for:
1. Use as a compass, get a real compass, there is no substitute for it.
2. Thermometer, though mine is very accurate while not on my wrist (body warmth effects it while wearing) I would take a real thermometer if I needed readings during the day.

I like it so well I have 2

Suunto2

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Re: Re: Watch on 12/16/2013 13:50:03 MST Print View

@Tad Englund,

I'm glad you have success with your Suunto.

Most of the BPL people have significant experience with their tools and not incompetent newbies.

A statement like this is trolling and looking to bait for a flame thread:

"You don’t buy a watch for:
1. Use as a compass, get a real compass, there is no substitute for it."

No one said we don't have a physical compass. It seems that every electronic product now has an e-compass, altimeter, and thermometer or app for that. in comparison against other products handheld GPS compass/alt/therm, wrist watch compass/alt/therm, Smartphone compass/alt, and of course physical compass, and thermometer - We know how to care, configure, calibrate, maintain the gear. We have read the manual too :-) The Suunto brand is the one with the highest occurence of deviation among the other metrics.

if it was an $8 item from a thrift store, we would have low expectation, but for a high end premium cost product, that is not acceptable to many. It's not a coincidence that every scuba dive trip, 5 out of 30 people are using Suunto watches, their temp degrees vary from the other 25 divers. It's so predictable that we all know Celcius degrees, farenheit degrees, and theirs is called Suunto Degrees, that a person has to compensate for it.

Either all the other e-brands (Seiko, citizen, garmin, magellan, Casio, etc) are incorrect, including a classic physical compass and a physical thermometer, or the obvious exception is that Suunto is too stubborn to review their algorythms.

You say your Suunto device is working out for you, glad to hear that. I wish you success.

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Watch (out) on 12/16/2013 14:25:41 MST Print View

Roger, thank you for taking the bait, I was having a slow Monday and needed something to wake me up.
BTW, I had 3 Suunto Core's but gave one away to my son in law. Yes I like them, but I also understand their limitations as well as the limitations of all the other options out there. For me the Core looks/works the best.



I figured you would be the one taking the bait, and appreciate your reponse and the diversion from my Monday scheduling/paperwork.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread on 12/16/2013 14:50:25 MST Print View

I LOVE my Casio.
Casio Pathfinder
The only item that has been with me on every hike since I bought it.
The thermometer and altimeter work for me as does the alarm and night light
I even made a You Tube video with it of an event that I will never see happening again :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzqPzV6cFSQ

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
The reverse approach. on 12/16/2013 15:08:52 MST Print View

Rather that tolerate a mediocre altimeter within a functional watch, I go for great altimeter and accept some inconveniences as a timepiece:

Thommen wirstwatch

The batteries never need replacing, as there aren't any. The display has no lower temp limit, and the duct-tape watchband can be used for repairs or first-aid situations.

For use as a timepiece, you simply hang it from a 6.2 meter string and each period of the pendulum is 5 seconds long. For long periods, simply place it in the ground, and mark its shadow every 15 degrees for each hour.

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: The reverse approach. on 12/16/2013 15:27:28 MST Print View

David nice durable band, but isn’t the last layer a real pain to get off when you have to rip it off your arm hair?
For some of the younger set here you might want to explain what thing is on top of your wrist is (hooked to the duct tape).



Good thing you don’t need a slide rule for the explanation

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: The reverse approach. on 12/16/2013 15:52:26 MST Print View

>"but isn’t the last layer a real pain to get off when you have to rip it off your arm hair?"

Ah, but that is also weight-saving. I can leave my razor at home.

For the younger set. Just a few years ago, at your 5th birthday party, you used one of these party favors:blow-up party favor

When the air pressure inside the coiled tube is low, the coil is contracted. When the air pressure is greater inside the coiled tube, it expands (you blow in it, it moves).

If you made such a coiled tube out of metal, sealed some air inside and through gears magnified that movement to move a needle around on a dial, you'd have created an altimeter. These Thommen alitmeters are graduated in 20-foot intervals, but you can read them to 5 feet. They are sensitive enough that I can see the needle move if I crack the car windows as I'm driving down the road.

I always wanted to create an altimeter using an expanding bag of Cheetios, inside a cigar box, pushing a paper clip of the box (which would be calibrated in feet of altitude) with a rubber band to return the needle upon descent. Then the Unabomber came on the scene, caused many of us at UC Berkeley delays for security at the computer science building, and increased the suspicions about home-made pressure switches.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Didn't like Suunto, now use Casio on 12/16/2013 16:31:01 MST Print View

"the Altimeter is accurate within 200 ft"

Hopefully this is a typo?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Didn't like Suunto, now use Casio on 12/16/2013 16:35:23 MST Print View

"the Altimeter is accurate within 200 ft"

I think this is called setting the bar pretty low. Pun intended.

--B.G.--

rOg w
(rOg_w) - F - M

Locale: rogwilmers.wordpress
deleted on 12/16/2013 17:46:19 MST Print View

deleted

Edited by rOg_w on 01/16/2014 21:29:02 MST.

wiiawiwb wiiawiwb
(wiiawiwb) - F
Avocet on 12/16/2013 18:08:57 MST Print View

Avocet

Too bad they're not made any more!

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Suunto owner/hater on 12/16/2013 18:30:11 MST Print View

Yeah, I have a 1st gen Suunto and it SUCKS up batteries.

And it SUCKS at ease of use.

And its night time illumination SUCKS.

Did I mention this watch SUCKS?

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/16/2013 18:36:12 MST Print View

Since this is BPL, a watch should be light and durable!

watches

My Backpacking Watches

wiiawiwb wiiawiwb
(wiiawiwb) - F
Suunto on 12/16/2013 18:39:34 MST Print View

I have a Suunto X3HR and the company apparently doesn't make replacement bands. I bought one on the internet that claimed to fit the model number and it didn't fit. Thirty bucks down the rat hole.

When I called Suunto I got some guy with a foreign accent who told me to go to a jeweler to see if they could help. Now that's what I call customer service!

I'd never buy one of their products again. They may make the best product and may even offer the best service on planet earth but I'm one who slipped through the cracks despite repeated attempts to get help.

The watch still works fine but the plastic/rubber watch band split and needs to be replaced.

It's what I call planned obsolescence. In my world, Suunto is as obsolete as a dinosaur.

The irony of the whole situation is that my Avocet is no longer made yet I can still buy watch bands from the company and they still service existing products. Suunto could learn a thing or two (or five thousand) from Avocet.

Edited by wiiawiwb on 12/16/2013 18:51:27 MST.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
watch on 12/16/2013 19:13:19 MST Print View

Watch

nothing fancy, readable in dark , well used

watch

Edited by livingontheroad on 12/16/2013 19:15:34 MST.

Brian Johns
(bcutlerj) - M

Locale: NorCal
Watch so basic ... on 12/16/2013 19:44:38 MST Print View

I use a seiko 5 auotmatic military style watch for casual and field use. At home I usually wear a diver model also automatic but a little dressier. But this is the daily beater for the field. no batteries to fail. Glow in the dark hands. Never given me any grief, oh and around $50. (I have a highgear Altimeter/Barometer/Thermometer/Compass, I wear skiing sometimes, but I really don't like the size of it, or its fiddle-factor. Too much watch to really be useful for my needs.


watch

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/16/2013 20:14:59 MST Print View

There is one thing I've learned in this thread, that Timex and Casio make the ugliest watches on the face of the Earth.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
sieko on 12/16/2013 20:51:31 MST Print View

That Sieko 5 auto looks like a nice watch!

Brian Johns
(bcutlerj) - M

Locale: NorCal
Re: sieko on 12/16/2013 21:03:26 MST Print View

It meets Nick G's requirements of being light and durable. And it's surprisingly accurate. Also keeps time most days after being off for 12-24 hours. Waterproof to sport diving depths - and tested. Oh and available in many colors. I really think Seiko and its "Seiko 5" line is quality for everyday wear. I have a hamilton and some older, more fragile watches, but I do like the looks and usefulness of my seiko autos.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: sieko on 12/16/2013 22:06:32 MST Print View

That Seiko is a nice looking watch. Am I correct in assuming that isn't the original band?

Brian Johns
(bcutlerj) - M

Locale: NorCal
Re: Re: Re: sieko on 12/16/2013 22:18:11 MST Print View

No. It is the original band. I mentioned above, they offer these in colors. They are all military / police specific (khaki, Navy, Black, etc.). They ripped off the NATO band, but did it a dis-service in that they did not utilize a continuous band going under both band posts/mounts. The design is improved greatly with a real one-piece band, so that if one pin/post fails, you won't lose the watch. I have not, however, made that mod, instead rolling the dice for two years so far successfully. Forewarned is forearmed ladies and gentlemen.

Edited by bcutlerj on 12/16/2013 22:19:59 MST.

Derek M.
(dmusashe) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Casio PAW1300 on 12/16/2013 22:56:20 MST Print View

+1 on the Casio PAW1300.

Nice and slim for an altimeter watch and will never need new batteries because it's solar powered. It holds a charge very well.

I have a weird admiration for extremely low powered electronics like these watches. In a time when you have to charge your phone every 8 hours, it sort of nice to get so much functionality out of a piece of equipment that you never need to plug in.

Ian Van Halen
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Re: sieko on 12/16/2013 23:19:34 MST Print View

I'm between watches sadly enough. I had the titanium pathfinder (similar to what Rodger posted) but takes a special band which is now broken. Lesson learned. Being a special snowflake isn't desirable in a watch for me so unless I'm sure I can easily find and replace the band myself, I'm going to stick to the traditional two post setup from now on.

I have a Casio divers watch that's still running strong since 1996 but I don't like that it doesn't have a light and the luminescent hands/numbers don't hold a charge for very long. It now belongs to my son.

I also have the Garmin Forerunner which is great for running but the battery life is insufficient for backpacking when the GPS is on; I might get six or so miles on difficult terrain in GPS mode before the battery will die. It's not the most comfortable watch to wear so it's not something that's EDC or normally goes backpacking with me.

I considered getting the Garmin Fenix but because it uses a rechargeable battery which will eventually need to be replaced, I don't like the idea of buying another disposable gadget.

Other than the issue I had with the band, I was satisfied with my Pathfinder so I may buy another one with a better band or.....

...at some point in the distant future pick up the Luminox Recon Pointman (yes I'm a tact-tool):

http://www.amazon.com/Luminox-Recon-Point-Quartz-A-8823-KM/dp/B009RKHXVI/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1387260224&sr=8-7&keywords=Luminox+pointman

I like that it's just a simple watch and is illuminated with tritium. I'm not sure that I'd use the tachymeter feature and I'm fine with kilometers vs miles so I may just go with a .km version to save a couple bucks. The supplied NATO band appears to be of good quality and long enough to go over a jacket so it's nice that I (hopefully) wouldn't have to upgrade from it.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Tritium on 12/17/2013 00:04:26 MST Print View

Ian, you know that Tritium has a half life of 12.3 years, don't you?

Ian Van Halen
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Tritium on 12/17/2013 00:10:34 MST Print View

"Ian, you know that Tritium has a half life of 12.3 years, don't you?"

Based on my experience with the USGI lensatic compass I'm fine with that and suspect that may be a conservative estimate. My compass is from the early 90s and is still glows strong enough to navigate at night sans headlamp.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Tritium on 12/17/2013 01:11:21 MST Print View

I use the same compass. Question is whose light will go out first - the compass or me.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread on 12/17/2013 13:57:05 MST Print View

rOg: I think that will run out fuel in 5 billion years.

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread on 12/18/2013 01:26:26 MST Print View

The Casio SGW100-1V has a temperature sensor and an electronic compass... I don't use either of those but they sounded cool when I bought it.

What works for me is the 200 M water resistant design. I spend several months every year fly fishing and dunking my hand (and the watch) under water (salt and fresh) and this guy just keeps on ... ticking?... or whatever digital watches do. I've had it for years and it's still going.

Casio SGW100-1V

Mark S
(gixer) - F
Problems unfastening watch strap on 12/18/2013 14:09:37 MST Print View

Have a old Casio Pro-Trek which always served it's purpose well.

I struggle to unfasten the strap though, so haven't worn a watch in years.
Tried a few elasticated straps but not found anything that fits well and is comfortable yet :(

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
@Nick on 12/18/2013 19:49:34 MST Print View

Nick,

My dad gave me his Swiss Army Watch, exactly like your red one, for graduating college. I've never seen another one before in my life, but it's that one.

Unfortunately, the resin casing wore away in the 15 years he had it and the watch is no longer produced by Swiss Army, so the watchband occasionally breaks. I learned this while hiking and luckily didn't lose the watch; it sits in a drawer now.

My father and I are looking for a suitable replacement "legacy" watch that I'll have for decades, like him and my grandfather have.

I think I'm going with this one:

Off


My previous watch was neat. G-Shock Riseman.Shock

This one has a fun story. I bought it when I was 14 from a jewelry store clerk who was hell-bent on swindling me out of $100. The watch was almost ten years old and nearing the end of it's functional life, but I bought in with all my savings. I wore it religiously for four years.

When I was 18, I wanted to go see a band called Queens of the Stone Age play live in NYC. I sold my kid brother the watch for $30 ticket money. I got sick the day of the concert and couldn't go.

That was the last time in my life I'd been sick. Harrison is still wearing the watch, but it's almost dead; when he pushes the Indiglo button, the numbers disappear for 5 minutes. I have seen Queens of the Stone Age twice since then, so I've recovered.

Edited by mdilthey on 12/18/2013 20:06:37 MST.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: @Nick on 12/18/2013 20:30:08 MST Print View

Max,

Have you tried sending it to Victronix? I have never done that, but my "legacy" watch my dad gave me in 1969 ( Seiko) has been repaired by the factory.

Regarding a legacy watch from your father, have you considered one of the Oyster Perpetual models by Rolex?

Ian Van Halen
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: @Nick on 12/18/2013 20:41:55 MST Print View

Max,

Swapping a nearly dead watch for a chance to see one of the greatest rock bands of the past 10 years is never a bad idea.

Saw them at the Gorge, WA with Soundgarden.

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Timex Indiglo on 12/18/2013 21:27:15 MST Print View

Apparently Nick and I have similar tastes in ugly Timex watches.

Viva la timex!

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Timex Indiglo on 12/18/2013 21:51:27 MST Print View

I think the Timex Expedition is a great looking watch, classic face with HANDS, not digital gobble-gook. Light, rugged, durable, and accurate. I need to remove the band and soak it is water for a few days, since it has become brittle and stiff with sweat-salt. I am thinking about buying another exact model, as manufacturers always seem to discontinue good products.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Tried That, Nick on 12/19/2013 15:03:29 MST Print View

Nick,

This particular Victorinox was price-preventative to try and fix. With no "Legacy" program, I would be investing at least several hundred in finding a watchmaker to custom-make a new casing, or spend hours researching to find an identical casing fit (with no guarantee of success).

It was a nice watch when my dad got it, but by no means a "generational" timepiece, I think it had a lifespan on it if it's using a non-metal casing.

I wanted to stick to Victorinox because he's wearing a new stainless Victorinox now, and like-father-like-son sentimentality makes up the roots of our family. :)

Thomas Willard
(TomW)

Locale: Mystic, CT
Casio PAW on 12/22/2013 01:35:33 MST Print View

This is going to sound weird but I bought the Casio PAW and every time I wore it, my wrist would get tingly and numb (I don't have any hardware in my body). I ended up buying a compass/ thermometer combo for my pack and went back to my $15.00 Timex.

Kiel Senninger
(Kiel.S.) - F

Locale: San Diego
Usefulness of altimeter on 12/28/2013 16:30:06 MST Print View

This thread got me thinking about getting a new watch. For those of you with altimeters on yours, do you find it useful? There's been a few times I thought it might help navigation wise. But if it's not super accurate it might not be worth it.

Thanks!

Todd Taylor
(texasbb) - F

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Usefulness of altimeter on 12/28/2013 16:47:31 MST Print View

"For those of you with altimeters on yours, do you find it useful? There's been a few times I thought it might help navigation wise. But if it's not super accurate it might not be worth it."

I got hooked on mine after a couple hours' hiking the first time. It does help with navigation, though you're right that it's not always as precise as you'd need for detailed work. But on a relaxed hike up/down a forest trail it's about all you need to figure out where you are and how far you have to go without having to watch very closely. And it can sometimes be handy in camp to warn you of changing weather.

I'd sooner give up the watch than the altimeter.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Casio PAW on 12/28/2013 17:52:20 MST Print View

> I bought the Casio PAW and every time I wore it, my wrist would get tingly and numb
When you walk with your arms hanging down, your hands tend to swell up a bit, as do your wrists. So what fitted when you were at home is now too tight. Just in case someone thinks I am talking (again) about feet/shoes, I will explain that I am now talking about a watchband around a wrist. It's now too tight, and that is putting pressure on the blood supply and nerves in your hand. Hence the tingles.

If you wear a watch like this in the snow you can get frostbite in the fingers of that hand. Get's really painful after a while.

I cut the huge and ridiculously bulky band off my watch/altimeter, and either carry it tied inside a pocket or on a cord around my neck. More often in my pocket as it fights with my compass when hanging around my neck.

And in case anyone asks, I reckon the compass in any digital watch is a heap of very unreliable 2-axis battery-munching crap. IMHO.

Cheers

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Casio PAW on 12/28/2013 18:18:26 MST Print View

"your hands tend to swell up a bit"

The standard recommendation here is that it happens to many backpackers. Sometimes you can alleviate it somewhat by adjusting shoulder straps. Symptoms may persist through the trip, but it should be easing off by 24 hours after the end of the trip.

--B.G.--

Thomas Willard
(TomW)

Locale: Mystic, CT
Tingly and Numb on 12/28/2013 20:44:19 MST Print View

I should clarify a little. I was getting these sensations sitting at home, on the couch or general day to day business. I wear my watch band loose as I do not like the snug feeling. The sensation would start at my wrist bone (where the watch touches) as if there was a strong magnetic wave going into my body. This feeling had nothing to do with swelling from the tightness of the band. Like I said...weird.

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Re: Tingly and Numb on 12/29/2013 00:49:56 MST Print View

Thomas,
Tingling in the wrist and fingertips without the obvious causes -> That is not normal, and could be a symptom of something very serious. My dad who is on a dozen medications, says he feels hand numbness when a heart attack is coming on.

Before we start dispensing medical advice, you should do more testing to narrow it down, and eliminate false positives.

You should keep a journal of each occurrence and talk it over with a doctor.

does it happen at the same place, but not other locations (at the keyboard?)
does it happen around around certain electronics? radio, TV, microwave oven?
does it happen when you are standing up or sitting down or walk?
do you feel dizziness, heartburn or indigestion along?
how about your hydration level?
especially salty meals prior?
Do you wear a ring on your finger?
I used to get tingly fingers when I packed heavy and didn't understand how the backpack belt shifted weight off my shoulders. Now my pack's waist belt is tight, and my shoulder straps are gently touching, but without pressure on my shoulder's blood circulation.

I do believe you, but it is unlikely that a wristwatch's electronic functions are the cause. Something could physically be restricting the blood flow.

david delabaere
(davidvcd) - M

Locale: Northern VA
casio bm-100wj on 12/29/2013 03:26:19 MST Print View

casio bm-100wjcasio bm-100wj

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Timex Indiglo on 12/29/2013 07:12:02 MST Print View

I just use one of the basic Timex ironmans. keep it strapped to my shoulder strap upside down so i can read it on the go.

watch

Ryan Smith
(ViolentGreen) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Re: Re: Timex Indiglo on 12/29/2013 12:03:43 MST Print View

Oh yeah, forgot about this ol' clunker. Has served me well on the trail and in towns.

yeah

Yeah, maybe not. But if someone wants to send me this watch, let me know and I will PM my address.

Ryan

Thomas Willard
(TomW)

Locale: Mystic, CT
Watch on 12/29/2013 23:14:31 MST Print View

Roger-

It only happened when I would wear the watch (I don't wear watches all the time). I had a full work-up on my heart as part of a physical (stress test, labs, ECG, etc) which was after I stopped wearing the watch and my ticker is in great shape. My only conclusion is I am overly sensitive of the magnetic field in the watch. Not sure. I never felt that sensation before or after wearing it.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Watch on 12/29/2013 23:20:54 MST Print View

"My only conclusion is I am overly sensitive of the magnetic field in the watch."

I seriously doubt that one.

--B.G.--

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Re: Watch (Reply to Thomas Willard) on 12/30/2013 01:24:45 MST Print View

If you strongly suspect the magnetic field, look into:

1) standing under a powerline for observation.

2) buy an EMF Electro Magnetic Field detector (range from $50 to $300)
You'll be surprised what you find. A hair blow dryer on high setting close to your head has the same potency as 10 microwave ovens 5 ft away...

3) poorman setup, carry a compass in your pocket, and when you feel the tingling check if the compass needle is misbehaving, you are about to be teleported into the alien space ship :)

Edited by RogerDodger on 12/30/2013 01:25:39 MST.

Thomas H
(PTH) - F
Re: Avocet on 12/31/2013 14:57:18 MST Print View

Regarding the Avocet They have a little brother now though:ws4 timex Timex WS4

Its biig but have not found anything that compares

Edited by PTH on 12/31/2013 14:58:11 MST.

K C
(KalebC) - F

Locale: South West
Watches... on 12/31/2013 20:50:08 MST Print View

I stopped wearing one since cell phones were invented. My iphone 5s sure is a multi-purpose tool on and off the trail....

Daniel Pittman
(pitsy) - M

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/31/2013 21:38:14 MST Print View

I don't wear one, as my dumb-phone has a clock. When I did have a watch it did neat tricks like this.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread. on 12/31/2013 22:58:39 MST Print View

I usually refer to my "iWatch" because it's there.

iWatch


I have a bunch of dead and heavy watches in a drawer. This Timex Ironman is my trail watch with more than enough functions, waterproof, backlight, cheap, tolerates sweat and dirt. Beach hiking requires more time keeping and an alarm so you get up in time to coordinate with the tides.

Ironman Triathalon

I like that Seiko 5!

Edited by dwambaugh on 12/31/2013 23:02:01 MST.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re:watch alternatives on 01/03/2014 21:52:11 MST Print View

This thread got me to thinking (always dangerous, or course) and looking at pedometers that have a clock function, the idea being to get something more for the weight than basic time keeping.

You can find them with all kinds of bells and whistles. The Oregon Scientific unit on the left will take your pulse too. I want one with a thermometer.

Weight wise, the watch is 1.0oz, the Oregon Scientific rig is 1.2oz, the Omron in the middle is 2.0oz as shown and the Sportline on the right is also 1.2oz.


Pedometers with Timex Ironman

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re:watch alternatives on 01/03/2014 21:59:31 MST Print View

Does anybody know of a good backpacker's alarm clock that is loud and still weighs less than an ounce?

I wear a wristwatch with an alarm mode, but when it is on my wrist inside a sleeping bag, I never hear it. I have a small alarm clock that weighs slightly over one ounce, and it is OK. I tie it onto my tarp's front pole, so the alarm sound will be within a foot of my ears.

Part of the problem is that in order for an alarm clock to have a loud sound, it often has to have a big power source, bigger than one AAA battery, and that will likely put it over the one ounce mark right there. Smaller alarm clocks get by with a "watch battery" to get a lighter weight, but the sound isn't normally so loud.

--B.G.--

Rick Adams
(rickadams100) - M
watch alarm on 01/03/2014 22:43:02 MST Print View

I've had reasonably good success with a 10 dollar watch with alarm placed near my head with flashlight and water bottle. I only use the watch for the alarm function as I only think about time in a very general sense during the day. I'd prefer a lightish alarm clock. What brand and or model are you using?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: alarm on 01/03/2014 23:21:00 MST Print View

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/equity-by-la-crosse-digital-pocket-alarm-clock-blue/6510759.p?id=1218751969994&skuId=6510759

This is identical to the old one that I use. It is about 3.5" long.

--B.G.--

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Let's see a picture of your WATCH thread on 01/13/2014 21:58:34 MST Print View

Its hot outside...
The official (in the shade) temperature is 43c but I thought of taking the temperature in the sun in my front yard.
At about 3:30PM having left there my watch,the mercury thermometer and my Kestrel, I found the Casio with a complete LCD bleed (the screen was all dark) the other two indicated max (over 50c) on one and 56c on the Kestrel.
Took the Casio inside, after about 2 minutes the screen went back to normal indicating 44.8 c.
So two lessons from this :
do not leave your Casio in the hot sun
If it looks stuffed maybe it isn't, just give it time.
I took this shot a bit later not letting the Casio get up to the correct temp.
55c is 131f
how hot is it ?

Ryan "Rudy" Oury
(ohdogg79)

Locale: East Bay - CA
no calculator watches??? on 01/15/2014 08:50:43 MST Print View

I'm sorely disappointed and utterly confused that nobody is using the classic Casio calculator watch?! SO sleek and stylish, allows you to calculate calorie usage or distance hiked (assuming you know how fast you're going) or base weight each time you finish a bottle of water, etc etc etc. Endless uses :)
casio watch

But seriously, here's my basic Timex Expedition. Real basic, just time and date for less than 2 oz and $20 or so. I think mine is actually the "women's" model since I'm fairly small, and don't like big watches so got the smaller version.
timex watch

I'd like to get a multi-finction one w/ altimeter/compass/thermometer/screwdriver at some point but not ready to drop much coin on a good one that's worth having. Love David Thompson's idea of the professional altimeter that can double as a sundial though... ingenious!
**edited for typo**

Edited by ohdogg79 on 01/15/2014 08:55:22 MST.

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Re: no calculator watches??? on 01/15/2014 09:09:37 MST Print View

@Ryan,
I had a king of the math nerds Casio Calculator, thought I would use it ALL the time. Turns out I prefer GearGrams.com, a full size keyboard and Excel instead.

William F
(wkf) - F

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re:watch alternatives on 01/26/2014 14:37:50 MST Print View

Hey Bob,

I got this little alarm clock a few weeks ago, http://www.ebay.com/itm/Equity-31571-Battery-Operated-Digital-Stick-On-Alarm-Clock-Timer-/261187998060?ssPageName=ADME:X:RTQ:US:1123

I weighed it at home and it came out to 32.5 g with the battery and magnet on the back. So if I remove the magnet maybe a few grams less. I think they have it listed at 2 oz or something, and other sites will have other inaccurate weights posted. Notice it has a temperature readout on it. The alarm is loud in my opinion; certainly enough to wake me up in the woods. With all this said, it was cheap and I haven't tested it much in more extreme conditions… you usually get what you pay for.