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Avalanche Safety for Backcountry Travelers
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Daniel Paladino
(dtpaladino) - F - MLife

Locale: Northern Rockies
Avalanche Safety for Backcountry Travelers on 12/08/2013 00:12:19 MST Print View

Kevin, Excellent article. This is obviously geared toward beginners, and the concepts you illustrated provide a very good stepping stone to more advanced education.

One MAJOR concept that should be included when discussing avalanche terrain is slope convexity vs. concavity. Convex slopes, even if the they start at shallow angles, are exceptionally weak, and can act as dangerous trigger point for much larger avalanches. More info here: http://www.fsavalanche.org/encyclopedia/convex_slope.htm

Kevin Sawchuk
(ksawchuk) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Northern California
Re: Avalanche Safety for Backcountry Travelers on 12/08/2013 14:39:36 MST Print View

Yes. Excellent point that I could have made more strongly. Micro terrain dictates significant differences in risk. You've got to develop an eye for it.

icefest From Australia
(icefest)
Re: Fascinating, but on 12/19/2013 21:00:42 MST Print View

>To the best of my knowledge, there has been just one avalanche in the Australian snow fields over the last 20 - 40 years.

I think small slab slides are not that uncommon.
The Aussie ski forums have several reports of near misses.

I definitely agree that Aussie ski tourers are worried much less about them than those in the states.


http://forums.ski.com.au/xf/threads/avalanche-rescue-on-bogong.22624/
http://forums.ski.com.au/xf/threads/avalanche-risk-australian-backcountry.49574/