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Ross Bleakney
(rossbleakney) - MLife

Locale: Cascades
Looking for a folding saw around 4 ounces on 11/18/2013 10:01:23 MST Print View

I have a small folding saw that I use to remove tree debris from the trail (typically branches off of blowdowns). It weighs a little less than 4 ounces (104 grams). It has a blade that is about 6 inches long. I like it, but it has become dull, and I can't find a replacement blade.

I've heard good things about some of the sliding blade saws, but I much prefer a folding saw. It just seems more convenient to me. I've heard very good things about the Bahco Laplander, but it is a bit heavier and bigger. I'm afraid that if own a heavier saw, I'll be less likely to throw it in my day pack. Does anyone know of a good folding saw around four ounces? Should I just buy a Laplander and live with the extra weight? I wouldn't mind doing minor modifications to save some weight, although I don't think I'll do this: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=2237

Edited by rossbleakney on 11/18/2013 10:12:31 MST.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Looking for a 4 ounce folding saw on 11/18/2013 10:12:05 MST Print View

I got Corona 6 1/2 inch folding saw http://www.coronatools.com/item/rs-4040?referer=folding-saws. Usable blade length is 6.5 inches, so theoretically, it could cut 13 inch logs.

But it's 5.5 ounces

I used one that looks almost identical except slightly bigger, heavier, but it got dull, so I replaced it. The teeth are very agressive - cuts big branches easily.

I take it on maybe 1/4 of my backpack trips. Handy for cutting firewood. I've used it to cut snow blocks to clear out an area to pitch tent. I think if some creature tried to bother me, it would be a very effective weapon. Okay, I don't need to be paranoid : )

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Looking for a folding saw around 4 ounces on 11/18/2013 12:12:24 MST Print View

This isn't a direct answer to your question, but avoid the gerber/fiskars slide saw. It's a piece of junk, flexes way to much.
The laplander is an awesome saw but a little heavier because of the beefy handle.

Look into silky saws, they are top of the line quality.

Ross Bleakney
(rossbleakney) - MLife

Locale: Cascades
Re: Re: Looking for a folding saw around 4 ounces on 11/18/2013 12:22:28 MST Print View

Thanks (to both of you). I'm leaning towards the Silky Pocket Boy 130 or maybe the Felco 600 saw. The Silky looks outstanding, but the Felco is one of the few that is less than five ounces. It is also a bit smaller (which explains the weight difference). Do you know anything about the Felco (http://www.felcostore.com/item/f600?referer=saws)? Folks on Amazon seem to like it.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
re on 11/18/2013 13:27:18 MST Print View

I was going to say can't people step over the branch but I guess they might just walk of trail and around it.

Edited by M.L on 11/18/2013 13:29:00 MST.

David Gardner
(GardnerOutdoorLD) - M

Locale: Northern California
Re: Re: Re: Looking for a folding saw around 4 ounces on 11/18/2013 13:30:29 MST Print View

Gerber makes a 3.1 oz folding saw with a 5.25" blade. Very rugged, blade locks in place. Teeth are shaped like chain saw teeth and blast through branches.
gerber

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Spyderco on 11/18/2013 13:38:08 MST Print View

Spyderco Spydersaw. 3 oz. Cuts like a light saber.

http://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=51

Sadly, must watch the used market.

Edited by Bolster on 11/18/2013 13:38:40 MST.

Nico .
(NickB) - MLife

Locale: Los Padres National Forest
+1 to Silky Saws on 11/18/2013 14:00:05 MST Print View

The Silky Saws aren't the lightest but they're excellent quality. I use the Silky Pocket Boy's bigger sibling the Silky Big Boy on assorted trail projects. Even at more like a pound, I don't notice it in my pack when we're on a trail work trip. It holds up well to years of use.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: re on 11/18/2013 14:03:00 MST Print View

"I was going to say can't people step over the branch but I guess they might just walk of trail and around it."

If the branch is high enough you can't step over it or there are a bunch of branches then it can be difficult to get through. If the slope is steep or there's a lot of brush it can be difficult to go around.

If I can clear a lot of the smaller branches, when one of the limited crews go through, they can concentrate on big logs I can't do.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Looking for a folding saw around 4 ounces on 11/18/2013 14:07:43 MST Print View

The Laplander is just a couple ounces more.

Contrary to the experienced of others, I have found the Gerber sliding saw to be very easy to use. Perhaps it was the wood we were cutting. I've taken down 6" thick trees in minutes using one. Larger trees require some notching and/or double cuts. I have used hand saws quite a bit, so my experience may make a difference.

The PocketBoy saws are quite good, but heavy in the handle.

From there, the Sven saw seems to be the next cog up, but it is closer to a pound, IIRC.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Re: Looking for a folding saw around 4 ounces on 11/18/2013 14:11:35 MST Print View

Dale, it's been a few years since I've used one so maybe they have changed.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
How about around 1 ounce? on 11/18/2013 14:27:47 MST Print View

Here is a selection from my gear shed. Okay, gear barn.

Four saws

All weights are in ounces, no packaging. All lengths are the toothed portion of each blade, manufacturers probably claim a little longer. All cut on the pull stroke.

On the left are two of my MYOG efforts. Left is a portion of a bandsaw blade, cut to length, with finger indents sanded in and plasti-dip coating applied for padding and anti-slip. It does fine on 1" to 2" branches, especially green wood. Not as well on hard dead branches that I use for firewood. It's high points are the very low weight and the long length. If you had to cut a big branch, small tree or 4x4, you could, eventually.

Second from the left, I did the same thing, but to a reciprocating saw blade. It has more aggressive and sharper teeth, so it does better, although it weighs more due to its thicker blade.

The mini folding one is Coghlan's and has a very thin blade. $8. Fine for 1" branches. 2" would be doable.
http://www.amazon.com/Coghlans-0562-CoghlanS-Pocket-Sierra/dp/B000KBLCXS/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1384809660&sr=8-3&keywords=folding+saw+coghlans

The Felco 600 is 5.6 ounces without packaging, not the 5 ounces mentioned above. I got mine a few months ago. Nice blade, truly lovely, comfortable handle. Smooth locking mechanism. $30. If I was planning on doing much trail work, I'd bring this.

For the occasional annoying branch on a trail or to fuel a wood-burning on a thru hike, I'd go with one of the first three to save the weight. I've debated honing the back of the MYOG blades to have a knife on the back side - 7.5 inches fillets any sockeye salmon and handles small (to 25-pounds) halibut.

If you want either of the MYOG saws, PM me - I gave away a batch of them a year ago. Time to fire up the production line again.

Edited by DavidinKenai on 11/18/2013 14:30:38 MST.

David Gardner
(GardnerOutdoorLD) - M

Locale: Northern California
Re: How about around 1 ounce? on 11/20/2013 00:12:15 MST Print View

David Thomas inspired me. Made a trip to the hardware store before they closed last night and got two reciprocating saw blades. Used a grinder to shape the finger indents and finished with a file. Put red oak handles on one, dipped the other in Plasti-Dip. Also sharpened the back of the oak handled saw to use as a knife. Started to drill out some holes to lighten the blades, but the blade metal is extremely hard and ate several bits. Just ordered a cobalt bit set from Amazon that should do the trick. The "sheath" is a plastic tube that some welding rod came in, but I'm still working on a good UL way to sheath/pack them. Suggestions?

7" saw

8" saw

sheathed

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: How about around 1 ounce? on 11/20/2013 01:09:58 MST Print View

Damn! You showed me up! That looks really good.

My MYOG effort is in the capable hands of the USPS winging its way to you, 2,116 miles from Kenai to Petaluma.

Look at what shows up in the mail. I may have selected a better recip blade to start with. I'd be curious about how the three versions compare on green and cured wood. They are definitely different styles of blades.

Super light sheath: Cut strips from the sides of a 1-gallon HDPE milk carton. Cut them with a pair of scissors, not a razor knife - it's safer that way. Tape together two such pieces with duct tape, Gorilla tape or vapor barrier (very sticky, usually red, 2"-wide) tape.

peter vacco
(fluff@inreach.com) - M

Locale: no. california
Re: Looking for a folding saw around 4 ounces on 11/20/2013 06:45:54 MST Print View

peter does a bit of trail maint, and has found that loppers make a better tool than a small bow saw.
if you are only going to have one tool, a lopper lets you get more done, if what you are doing is clearing trail.
loppers come BIG too, and those Rock.

v.

peter vacco
(fluff@inreach.com) - M

Locale: no. california
drilling thru saw blades on 11/20/2013 07:06:13 MST Print View

peter has had the opportunity to drill hundreds of holes thru industrial band saw blades, and yes, cobalt is the way to go. 3/16" is about the best i have been able to do size wise. the issues are both the way twist drill points work (which involves flowing metal at the chisel point very tip of the end), and the fact that if it ever does get a bite you then have to shear that metal out of the hole with what is really a very small piece of steel (the bit).
a rigid setup on your drill press seems to make things go smoother. slow speed helps too. a very thick and substantial drill lube is also a plus. solidness not only dimensionally, but rotationally is important. it that thing stops turning, it snaps.
chinese drill bits are not going to successfully handle this (or most other) task.
drilling blades can be done . it's not for the faint of heart, nor is it recreational grade fun.
my bits go about a dozen holes (thru saw blades) at best. i can resharpen them in a few moments, it's a matter of seconds. the tool to correctly resharpen small bits runs about 2k. if you true your grinding wheel with a diamond point, it's head and shoulders above any other method.
that $80 little blue sharpener they sell is a nifty device, it's just not worth a pfart for sharpening drill bits. great for other things though. i have two of them.

if you are drilling saw blades to save weight .. save yourself some grief and do something useful with the evening, and save your wife from your being in a bad mood.

David Gardner
(GardnerOutdoorLD) - M

Locale: Northern California
Re: Looking for a folding saw around 4 ounces on 11/20/2013 07:58:36 MST Print View

David Thomas: I will try all three saws on both green and seasoned wood and report the results.

Peter: Thanks for the tips on drilling saw blades. I'll put my drill press on the slowest speed, use a lot of lube, and clamp the blades. My wife is happy when I am happy, so she encourages me in these endeavors. I am a fortunate man.

Elliott Wolin
(ewolin) - MLife

Locale: Hampton Roads, Virginia
RE: Looking for a 4 ounce folding saw on 11/20/2013 10:59:16 MST Print View

Am I missing something, can't your original saw be resharpened?

David Gardner
(GardnerOutdoorLD) - M

Locale: Northern California
Curved 11.5" sub-4 ounce saw on 11/20/2013 12:17:52 MST Print View

The latest. When I finish drilling the lightening holes I think I can get it down to about 3.7 oz. This beast should make short work of small wood, and theoretically cut logs too. Plus it comes with a plastic tooth guard and a cardboard sheath that I will reinforce with a bit of duct tape.

11.5"

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: UL sheaths on 11/20/2013 12:32:11 MST Print View

The plastic spine from a report cover makes a great blade edge guard, but most are limited to 11". Add a rubber band if you fear it falling off.

Drilling those blades seems like a lot of effort for the gain!

Edited by dwambaugh on 11/21/2013 10:58:40 MST.