twenty five years ago today
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Mark Ries
(mtmnmark) - M

Locale: IOWAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
twenty five years ago today on 11/14/2013 09:45:05 MST Print View

I drank my last drink and did my last drug. In August 92 I quit a three pack per day minimum smoking habit. Shortly after that backpacking began.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: twenty five years ago today on 11/14/2013 09:48:16 MST Print View

Mark,

Congratulations and happy anniversary! May you have many more.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: twenty five years ago today on 11/14/2013 09:49:37 MST Print View

Well done sir

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: twenty five years ago today on 11/14/2013 10:00:06 MST Print View

My last day of smoking came after I got a positive pregnancy test for my oldest. I went outside, had a last smoke and threw away the pack. He is 16 now. I have never regretted losing that habit!

Congrats to your anniversary! 3 packs a day? Holy......yikes!

Peter S
(prse) - MLife

Locale: Denmark
wow on 11/14/2013 12:36:36 MST Print View

Congrats! That's impressive!


A curious question for you ex-smokers, Sarah and Mark: - How long was the period from the day you quit smoking to you felt "cleansed" (no shakes, headaches, bad mood, longings..etc...) ?

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: wow on 11/14/2013 12:57:06 MST Print View

"A curious question for you ex-smokers, Sarah and Mark: - How long was the period from the day you quit smoking to you felt "cleansed" (no shakes, headaches, bad mood, longings..etc...) ?"

For me it was about a month. Unfortunately the psychological addiction lasts forever. It doesn't happen all that often but there are times when I smell a cigarette and really want to have one even though I've had zero nicotine since '99.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: wow on 11/14/2013 13:06:34 MST Print View

"A curious question for you ex-smokers, Sarah and Mark: - How long was the period from the day you quit smoking to you felt "cleansed""

I stopped smoking some 20+ years ago, but I'll always feel dirty.....

Of course, smoking has nothing to do with that. I'm lucky in that I can 'turn on a dime.' I smoked between 1-2 packs a day, one of those folks who had one lit before my feet hit the floor in the morning. One morning I woke up, looked at the pack, and kinda said to myself: I don't want to do that anymore. And I didn't. Never had shakes, longings, headaches, etc.

Mark Ries
(mtmnmark) - M

Locale: IOWAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
Re: wow on 11/14/2013 14:48:56 MST Print View

Thanks everyone. The physical addiction from nicotine is over in a week. The mental addiction and cravings can go on months and even years. I carried nicotine patches in my wallet for years in case I was gonna give in I'd slap on a patch rather than light up. There were times when I was pulling one out of my wallet and then said this is stupid and put them back had I bummed a smoke it would have started all over

doug thomas
(sparky52804) - MLife

Locale: Eastern Iowa
Re: Re: wow on 11/14/2013 18:15:41 MST Print View

happy anniversary buddy

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
Re: Re: Re: wow on 11/14/2013 18:31:27 MST Print View

Happy anniversary! That is an accomplishment worth celebrating.

My parents both smoked 3 packs a day each and they both died too early because of it.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: wow on 11/14/2013 19:30:11 MST Print View

Thankfully I was in my first tri so everything smelled nasty...lol! My oldest was premature (which I couldn't have prevented) and his Doctor said to me "Please do NOT expose him to any tobacco smoke" as I took him home. I had 7 months to get over the cravings - and I wasn't going to bars, a huge trigger for me, so not smoking around my baby was no problem.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: twenty five years ago today on 11/14/2013 21:02:27 MST Print View

Way to go Mark!

Peter S
(prse) - MLife

Locale: Denmark
Interesting on 11/19/2013 15:15:16 MST Print View

Interesting that you have different experiences quitting smoking. Even more impressed, that some of you can have a craving so many years later, and never to have given in.

Don't start in the first place kids!

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Interesting on 11/19/2013 15:31:13 MST Print View

"Don't start in the first place kids!"

+100

Other than the yearly rogue craving, the only thing I miss is cigars. I figured when I quit that it was best to get rid of all the nicotine altogether so unfortunately cigars made the list.

Tim Zen
(asdzxc57) - F

Locale: MI
Re: twenty five years ago today on 11/22/2013 20:56:36 MST Print View

Gee -- 25 years ago we didn't have kids and were so happy. What were we thinking. I think I started smoking and drinking after they showed up.

Edited by asdzxc57 on 11/22/2013 20:57:09 MST.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Interesting on 11/25/2013 18:19:12 MST Print View

>"Interesting that you have different experiences quitting smoking."

Quite true. My wife helps some of her patients to quit (and advises all of them to), and individual experiences vary widely. Some people with great motivators and seemingly good willpower fail repeatedly while others succeed more easily.

Most people "quit" several times before it is permanent. It sounds like in this group, the first-time success rate was higher.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Glad to hear it on 11/25/2013 19:45:35 MST Print View

Very glad to hear your stories of quitting. You did the right thing. And congrats on the OP's anniversary. Cheers!

I have never smoked, myself, but my dad died last year of COPD (he virtually had no lungs left), and I was with him most of the way through the ugly end, so the issue has touched me. Both my mother and father have basically chain smoked their whole lives. No one could get them to quit, not even in the last decade or so with all the medical aids to quitting.

I have loads of great memories of my dad over the years, but unfortunately one that predominates now, but I hope will fade with time, is of my dad hunched over sitting in a chair in his underwear, already pretty far gone but not in the hospital, smoking. Then suddenly a severe coughing fit overtook him, and it sounded like he could hardly breathe and was coughing up lungs. Slowly, the fit gets under control, and he stops coughing. As soon as the coughing is over he pulls the lit cigarette that he has somehow managed to hold on to through the fit, back up to his lips to take another puff. Watching, and knowing from long experience there was absolutely nothing I could do about it.

Leaving aside the immediate health benefits of quitting, and all the backpacking trips you may miss if you don't - NOT the way I would choose to go out long term - I think I honestly would rather be eaten by wild animals than to die like my dad did. I know most people think of cancer, but slow suffocation is not the way to go either. When it finally got too bad, with them putting him on and off a respirator every few days, he chose immediate DNR as his best alternative, and he died a few days later. I'm very sure he wasn't really ready to go either.

I bring all of this up not to bum people out, but to reassure anyone on the fence that quitting is the right choice - take up some other addiction instead. ANY other addiction!

When I was in town with may dad, as he was dying, I was in line paying for gas, and a young girl - she must have been 15 or 16 (or at least looked it) was buying cigarettes. I remember wanting to yell at her like a Cassandra, but of course I didn't. A month back I took my mom and her husband touring around southern Utah, and she was coughing, just about exactly the way my dad did 10 years ago - and that is about how much younger she is that my dad. All through the trip she needed to take "bathroom breaks" about every 40 minutes, that always included stopping for a cigarette since she knew I wouldn't let her smoke in the car.

Guess it might be an occupational hazard of my generation - watching their parent die this way. Arggh!

Edited by millonas on 11/25/2013 20:10:52 MST.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: congrats on 11/25/2013 19:51:43 MST Print View

Congrats Mark R. on the kicking of unhealthy addictions.

Mark Ries
(mtmnmark) - M

Locale: IOWAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
thank you again on 11/28/2013 00:19:32 MST Print View

Thank you again for all the comments and thanks Mark M for sharing the story of your Dad I'm hoping that someone will read it and benefit from it. I'm sorry for your loss.