The Case Against Nylon Oven Bags for Pack Organization
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Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Re: The Case Against Nylon Oven Bags for Pack Organization on 11/07/2013 20:04:40 MST Print View

I use the medium as my clothes bag. It's .25 oz. but not see through.


http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/stuff_sacks.shtml

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
bags on 11/07/2013 21:22:10 MST Print View

Because they are unneccessary?

Everything fits in one pack liner, unless you are type A personality

Sorry, I cant relate. I just dont have much that must be organized.

Edited by livingontheroad on 11/07/2013 21:26:51 MST.

Billy Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: Re: Re: Re: The Case Against Nylon Oven Bags for Pack Organization on 11/07/2013 21:35:43 MST Print View

I have it indelibly burned into my mind from years ago: NEVER TAKE TWIST TIES INTO THE WILDERNESS. Like the original soft drink pop tops, they end up everywhere... in lakes, on the trail, around camps, on mountain tops...

Though I imagine you are being super careful to not drop them...

Bill D.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
The Case Against Nylon Oven Bags for Pack Organization on 11/07/2013 21:44:49 MST Print View

I don't need pack organization bags.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Type A. on 11/07/2013 22:20:39 MST Print View

Really? You guys just throw all your gear in together? I guess I am type A. I'm using one bag for food, one for clothes, and one for my quilt. I really don't want my food lending a lot of smell to the rest of my pack, and the nylon bags seem to be pretty good at that. I want my quilt dry. Clothes are sometimes wet and dirty and odorous, so a bag comes in handy.

Edited by Bolster on 11/07/2013 22:26:18 MST.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Type A. on 11/07/2013 22:52:20 MST Print View

"Clothes are sometimes wet and dirty and odorous, so a bag comes in handy."

When my clothes are wet after hiking in the rain, I like to bag them up and throw them in the sleeping bag with me to keep them warm for the next morning. I'm also a creature of habit. I like knowing that I can reach blindly in the dark into my ruck and will know exactly where any piece of gear is. It's also nice knowing that if I pull my rain shell out of my pack, I don't have to worry about my glove liners, etc accidentally coming out with it and leaving them on the trail. This is an area where the .25oz weight penalty is worth the convenience.

If anal explosive hiking is your style then HYOH I suppose.

Desert Dweller
(Drusilla)

Locale: Wild Wild West
Organization on 11/07/2013 22:58:08 MST Print View

To each his own.
So Craig how do you fill your pack?
I only use enough "bags" to keep things dry in case I fall in water while crossing or if I'm in a heavy rain.

Edited by Drusilla on 11/07/2013 22:58:49 MST.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Type A. on 11/07/2013 23:14:45 MST Print View

Yeah, I'm a type A when it comes to all the small stuff like spare batteries, first aid, small vials of DEET, etc. When it's time to go to the latrine, I want to have the TP, trowel, and hand cleaner in one place. I want the kitchen stuff together to protect my other gear and not have to go looking in the bottom of my pack for a spoon or lighter.

I missed the Nite Ize twistie tie thing. Good use of the product, and for those who are concerned, they aren't like the wire ties. An alternative would be a short length of line and a toggle.

http://www.niteize.com/product/Gear-Tie-3.asp

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Type A. on 11/07/2013 23:22:15 MST Print View

"Nite Ize twistie tie thing"

A three-inch length of insulated 14AWG copper wire will get the same job done at about 2% of the cost.

--B.G.--

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Type A. on 11/07/2013 23:30:23 MST Print View

"A three-inch length of insulated 14AWG copper wire will get the same job done at about 2% of the cost."

If the cut ends don't do a number on my windshirt or rain jacket. Don't use either myself :)

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Type A. on 11/07/2013 23:32:43 MST Print View

I carry a nylon sack for my food and a small bag for small stuff (compass, water pur tabs, lighter, extra batteries, and such).
I use my sleeping bag as a bag of sorts, I put all of my dry camp clothing inside my bag before stuffing it to the bottom. Clothes that I might need while hiking goes near the top. Everything else is somewhere in between.

Edited by justin_baker on 11/07/2013 23:35:13 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re: Type A. on 11/07/2013 23:33:38 MST Print View

You contract or shrink the insulation away from each end before you cut it, not afterward. Then the insulation will expand back over the cut end slightly.

--B.G.--

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Organization on 11/08/2013 09:56:33 MST Print View

A pack liner is different than an organization bag.

My sleeping bag and spare clothes go into a compactor bag to stay dry. If it's not going to be wet, I don't take a liner bag.

Clothes can be folded into each other for organization. Gloves and spare socks can be stored in a beanie or mosquito headnet or simply rolled up in a spare layer.

Kitchen gets stowed inside cook pot.

Shelter rolls up into itself- no bag needed. If it's wet, it lashes outside the pack.

Raingear rolls up into itself. If it's wet, It goes outside the pack.

The only separate bag I use is my food bag- for obvious reason....hanging, etc. I've used the same drybag for this for a few years.

I don't carry that many little items, so a pack pocket alone is sufficient for headlamp, knife, firestarting, first aid (in a ziplock), etc.


________________________________________


I've never seen the need for separating everything into its own bag. Organization bags seem like one of those things that you can certainly create a use for, but don't necessitate use.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Re: Re: Organization on 11/08/2013 10:00:29 MST Print View

> I've never seen the need for separating everything into its own bag.

OK, I see what you're saying. For clarification, I never intended "everything into its own bag" style of organization. In my case I'm talking 3 or 4 bags, not 50. I should have been more clear.

Using the nylon bags, I don't use a pack liner or compactor bag. One compactor bag = 2.4 oz = Five nylon oven bags.

Never occurred to use mosquito headnet as a stuffsack, clever. Will steal that idea if you don't mind.

Edited by Bolster on 11/08/2013 10:14:36 MST.

Desert Dweller
(Drusilla)

Locale: Wild Wild West
Packing stuff on 11/08/2013 16:47:45 MST Print View

Thanks Craig...my packing is similar, I just try to keep things simple. I always have packed night clothes into my sleeping bag, and warm hat and gloves in the hat and rain gear in itself (makes it quicker to deploy in storms).
I think once one travels for long periods, one develops their own "system" of packing and doing things with more and more economy. Regardless of how "type A" we can get. I started out years ago using lots and lots of ditty and stuff bags, but then got tired of keeping track of them all in the dark tent and over night so simplified as I got older. They are kind of a hold over from my old Kelty Tioga, that pack kind of requires things to be portioned and separated into their individual compartments, and was not waterproof. And that was OK when I was 20 and didn't mind carrying a 60 pound pack....not anymore!;-)

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Re: Organization on 11/08/2013 18:06:40 MST Print View

"I've never seen the need for separating everything into its own bag."

That's cause you're a desert dirtbag. I have a separate bag for EACH SOCK! One sock might get dirtier than the other, and I don't like mixing dirt.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Organization on 11/08/2013 18:09:43 MST Print View

Doug even has a stuff sack for his stuff sacks.

Somehow this seems like it came from an old George Carlin routine.

--B.G.--

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: Organization on 11/09/2013 17:17:58 MST Print View

"Doug even has a stuff sack for his stuff sacks."

Uh, yeah, Bob. That is called his pack. ;0)