MontBell Plasma 1000 Down Jacket Review
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Maia
(maia) - MLife

Locale: Rocky Mountains
MontBell Plasma 1000 Down Jacket Review on 11/05/2013 19:48:35 MST Print View

Companion forum thread to:

MontBell Plasma 1000 Down Jacket Review

DARCY OLSEN
(odarcy) - F - M

Locale: SW
Selkirk on 11/06/2013 05:37:07 MST Print View

I have the Selkirk UL jacket in a large , 6.8 oz. on my scale .

John Hillyer
(TrNameLucky) - MLife
No testing on the down on 11/06/2013 05:59:05 MST Print View

Too bad the issue of 1000FP down having less fill power when damp was not addressed. Also no word on how 1000FP was achieved. I am still wondering how this jacket performs in the field over multiple days in colder temps. :-(

Edited for spelling

Edited by TrNameLucky on 11/06/2013 06:00:20 MST.

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: MontBell Plasma 1000 Down Jacket Review on 11/07/2013 09:11:45 MST Print View

Will,

It was a pleasure to read your review. I have missed your excellent contributions to BPL.

Confused Newbie
(confused) - M

Locale: Northern CO
down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 13:12:16 MST Print View

I'm still learning about UL backpacking, and am curious about how down jackets (and bags) perform if you are out for several days in cold rainy weather. When I read gear lists, it seems like down is the key to significant lightening of weight, but I'm a bit scared of going to a solely down+shell system.

Ben Crocker
(alexdrewreed) - M

Locale: Kentucky
Down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 13:25:10 MST Print View

Bobb, with a little experience, I think you can keep your down dry. You do need to make sure you are doing what you need to to keep it dry, but it is a very good option. I backpack mostly in the wet southern Appalachians with down. I have never had a problem.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 13:29:54 MST Print View

If you don't ever expose your bag or jacket to rain, then it won't get wet with rain.

It's mostly an issue with cold and humid weather. When it's cold and humid(or very misty/foggy), everything takes forever to dry out.
For sleeping bags - normally when the air is dry and it's above freezing, your body heat evaporates the moisture from your perspiration and you stay dry. When it's humid, your perspiration accumulates faster than it can evaporate. Also, the colder it is the slower it evaporates and more lofty down bags can have moisture accumulate in the outermost layers because the outermost layers are far enough from that body that they still at freezing temperatures. Over several days it will build up.

People usually don't wear their down jackets while hiking unless it's an emergency. Down jackets are for when you get into camp and set up a shelter.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 13:34:35 MST Print View

If you are inexperienced and not paying attention to your down insulation, it can be the source of problems. However, when you first acquire a down sleeping bag, get a bit of paranoia about keeping it totally dry. Then very soon, that will become your natural instinct to keep it dry. It is one thing with a sleeping bag since you are asleep for most of the time that it is used. A down parka is easier, because during the middle of a day, you are fully awake and you ought to be conscious of what is happening to it. If you are sweating it too seriously from the inside, then why not remove a layer? Let ventilation be your friend.

I don't see anything at all wrong with a down+shell arrangement.

--B.G.--

Ben Crocker
(alexdrewreed) - M

Locale: Kentucky
Down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 13:46:42 MST Print View

I will say I think its easier to keep down dry in the western US(most of it anyway) than in the east. I don't know where you live. But if you live in the relatively dry west, the wet weather tends to come and go much more quickly, giving you a better opportunity to dry out. Of course I speak in generalities only.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 13:57:14 MST Print View

"I will say I think its easier to keep down dry in the western US(most of it anyway) than in the east."

By reputation, the weather in the Pacific Northwest tends to be wetter and cooler, and it stays that way for longer periods of time.

In the summer along California's John Muir Trail (somewhat high elevation), it can still get wet, but it tends to be much more sporadic, as Ben suggested. It can be cool, as well, but that varies tremendously with elevation. When a down sleeping bag or down jacket is used for some time, it can be dried on a sunny rock, and then packed for reuse later. At high elevation, there are few trees, so there is less shade to allow cold/wet spots to last.

--B.G.--

Bily Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 14:01:32 MST Print View

Bobb Bobb,
If you are going to do a trip where it might cold and rain every day, all day and you don't have experience with down in that kind of weather, I suggest you take at lest some fleece and/or synthetic stuff as safety items. Personally, I would go with synthetic bag, fleece camp pants, and fleece jacket in that kind of weather. Even with the most experienced and competent backpackers shit can happen.

Bill D.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 15:10:37 MST Print View

Great review. I was really on the fence as to whether or not I was going to buy the EX light or Plasma this winter. After reading this review, I think the EX light is a better purchase for my money.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: MontBell Plasma 1000 Down Jacket Review on 11/07/2013 22:40:00 MST Print View

Good review, and Thanks, Will!

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: down and wet weather on 11/07/2013 23:59:54 MST Print View

I'm still learning about UL backpacking, and am curious about how down jackets (and bags) perform if you are out for several days in cold rainy weather. When I read gear lists, it seems like down is the key to significant lightening of weight, but I'm a bit scared of going to a solely down+shell system.

i own and use a MB EXL

and i will say that when its raining hard at ~40F temps the entire day ... the EXL does not feel any warmer than a good fleece

never mind getting down wet ... just the 100% humidity degrades the loft

now if its cool and dry out, thats a different story

;)

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: MontBell Plasma 1000 Down Jacket Review on 11/08/2013 01:24:11 MST Print View

Why bother with a down jacket that won't keep you warm in sub-freezing weather? That is where down is at its best, when the precip is in the form of snow and humidity drops.

As with the light synthetic jackets, you basically have two very light windshirts with a wisp of insulation. If you re going to use it in cold conditions, why not throw a few more ounces of down in those light shells and get something that provides some real warmth?

There is a similar trend in synthetic fill jackets coming out with 40g fill. I thought 60g was weak! I think it is marketing oneupmanship to say "we have the lightest jacket" and sidestep the utility and practicality of the garment.

I also think that informal fashion trends spawn such things. They are great for running errands or a walk across campus, but they have limited use for hiking. They are indeed light weight, but so what!

John Abela
(JohnAbela) - MLife
Re: Re: MontBell Plasma 1000 Down Jacket Review on 11/08/2013 05:35:26 MST Print View

Great article Will.

My recommendation would be to double the amount of down in the Plasma Jacket, which would differentiate it from the Ex Light (and others) and substantially raise the warmth to weight ratio in a sub-7 oz (198 g) jacket.


I came to the same conclusion with this jacket.

I think it could be hard for them to stuff another 45 grams of down into the jacket, but they could easily, one would tend to think in looking and wearing this jacket, have gotten another 25-30 grams of down shoved into it.

I would have liked it to be longer.

It really is easy to understand why so many are choosing the Ex Light over this Plasma 1000.

Steve Genest
(srfish59) - M

Locale: SoCal
MontBell Plasma 1000 Down Jacket Review on 11/08/2013 17:29:55 MST Print View

Thank you for the review. I've been mulling over the many choices for down jackets and I like Montbell products in general. I'm returning to backpacking after many years and it's been expensive gearing up. In fact, I picked up a down sweater at Costco recently...packable down for $44. My trips will be at lower elevations here in SoCal so I'm hoping I can get by with this for awhile as part of a layering system. For the money, it won't be a big waste if it doesn't work, but one chilly outing could easily change that!

Jeffrey Wong
(kayak4water) - MLife

Locale: Pacific NW
Thanks on 11/08/2013 20:28:11 MST Print View

...for this informative review. I've had my finger on the trigger on the MB ExLight forever. Seeing how puffy it is and reading the squiggly black lines and dots gave me license to click buy/checkout.

Anthony Huhn
(anthonyjhuhn) - F - MLife

Locale: Mid West
Patagonia Encapsil Parka on 11/09/2013 11:57:12 MST Print View

Didn't the patagonia 1000 fill parka come out first?

http://www.patagonia.com/us/product/special-edition-encapsil-down-belay-parka?p=84645-0

Adam Klagsbrun
(klags) - MLife

Locale: Northeast US
Re: Patagonia Encapsil Parka on 11/09/2013 13:16:17 MST Print View

yeah Patagonia brought that out first, but its a COMPLETELY different jacket. I own one. And I have worn the montbell before, the ex lite. They are for entirely different purposes. I have no doubt that my Patagonia encapsil belay parka would keep me warm to about 0 degrees with a layer of long underwear under it. It is too hot for anything but the coldest of weather. It makes most sense to use as a parka for when you're hiking or climbing in winter and you stop to rest or for a break, or while in camp. You would not wear that jacket while hiking or mountaineering unless you were climbing a world-class mountain like Raineer or Everest. You would sweat yourself into dehydration in no time. The montbell in this review is a "down sweater" style meaning that while it is warm, it is a thinner garment not designed to stand alone in the deep cold that the patagonia encapsil does. This is patagonia's competitor to the montbell, and it isn't 1000 fill:

http://www.patagonia.com/us/product/mens-special-edition-down-sweater?p=11891-0&pcc=1128

these are the kinds of jackets you CAN wear while hiking, but I highly suggest a synthetic layer instead of a down layer for this purpose. I own one of these for that and recommend it VERY HIGHLY. Probably has become my favorite piece of clothing I own for hiking, seriously. It is heavier than the down by at least 5 oz but as something worn during the cool weather months, that extra weight means nothing if it is on your back instead of in your pack:

http://www.patagonia.com/us/product/mens-special-edition-down-sweater?p=11891-0&pcc=1128