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Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Easier to keep it dry than to dry it on 11/12/2013 09:30:44 MST Print View

"You don't need a pack liner. Wet **** takes all of 10 minutes in the sun to dry."

I respectfully disagree.

+1

That advice may work elsewhere but it's no good for Washington (and probably much of Oregon as well). I personally use the Zpacks roll top dry bag as a pack liner. Weighs ~ 2oz and is well worth the peace of mind.

Edit weight correction

Edited by IDBLOOM on 11/12/2013 09:35:50 MST.

Scott Musack
(ScottM) - F

Locale: Oregon
Re: Easier to keep it dry than to dry it on 11/12/2013 09:56:01 MST Print View

Agree with Buck, it's just plain smart to protect important gear (down bag, puffy jacket, etc) from getting wet. A trash bag liner in your pack is like 1.5oz (or less) and can double as a place to lay out gear in camp.

Clint Lum
(clintlum91) - F
Re: Re: PCT 2014 on 11/15/2013 10:14:09 MST Print View

Thanks for the comments Matthew,

--I am back and forth on the rain jacket. I thought about the umbrella but I still wonder about driving rain and how annoying it would be to hold it and walk for hundreds of miles, especially in the wind. I plan on adding hiking pants and doing away with the shorts.

--an extra pair of underwear is worth the few ounces for me.

--the SPOT is not for me as much my family and friends. I cant cut that because they like to know whats going on. And I will likely need the electronics because I will be working on my thesis for my Masters while I hike, this will include taking notes, recording things etc

--I would rather keep the pack liner and have dry clothes, and sleeping bag, but i could do away with stuff sacks and just use the liner as one big one...

--that is good advice for hiking with a partner... I will consider that some more

--thanks for the ideas regarding ear plugs, I will likely keep a pair, they weigh nothing and can come in handy.

Clint Lum
(clintlum91) - F
Thanks on 11/15/2013 10:17:26 MST Print View

For all the ideas! These help out a lot and give me ideas for the hike.


What do you guys recommend as far as bear canisters are concerned for the Sierra?

Brian Lewis
(brianle) - F

Locale: Pacific NW
bear can on 11/18/2013 15:13:31 MST Print View

"What do you guys recommend as far as bear canisters are concerned for the Sierra?"

Do you anticipate using a can other times so that you want to own one? In that case I'd get a Bear Vault.

If you think you only want one for the Sierras and never again, you could consider renting a Bearikade. Too expensive for me to want to own one, I have bear vaults, but a friend rented one to hike the PCT and was happy with it.

In part, the question relates to your resupply plan --- i.e., Kearsarge pass or not, climbing Whiteney or not, MTR vs. VVR, etc.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: bear can on 11/18/2013 15:22:15 MST Print View

"In part, the question relates to your resupply plan --- i.e., Kearsarge pass or not, climbing Whiteney or not, MTR vs. VVR, etc."

To extend this from Brian's post, I would say that before you acquire a bear canister, you need to know how much volume you need in a bear canister, and that is generally a function of how many days you will be out between resupply points, such as the long piece from around Mount Whitney up to MTR. If you say that is going to be ten days, then that means something. If you say that is going to be only three days, then that means something totally different. If you know that you can eat OK on 100 cubic inches of packed food, then that means something. If you don't know how much volume your packed food is, then that is a problem.

For short trips, I use a Bear Boxer or else a Bear Vault 450. For longer trips, I use a Bear Vault 500. You never want to have to carry more than one at a time, although it might be possible to switch between different ones during a trip by use of a bounce box.

--B.G.--

Clint Lum
(clintlum91) - F
Re: bear can on 11/21/2013 12:08:47 MST Print View

I would like to carry obviously the lightest and smallest possible. So I would not resupplying more often than normal through the sierra if this let me carry a lighter, and more importantly for my pack, a smaller can. But there are really long stretches through the Sierra that have no resupply correct?

I will be hiking likely around 25 miles a day (hopefully) if this means anything.

I am a bit worried that my pack (MLD Prophet) will not be able to carry a can. I usually have quite a bit of room left in the pack but I have never had to deal with a can.

Clint

Billy Ray
(rosyfinch) - M

Locale: the mountains
Re: Re: bear can on 11/21/2013 12:38:52 MST Print View

Actually, if you can do 20 or 25 miles a day and are willing to camp at the existing bear boxes, then you don't need a bear canister at all.

Last time I checked with SEKI thru hikers are allowed to use the steel bear boxes for overnight storage. Outside the bear canister required areas you are allowed to hang your food from trees... but that also limits your camp selections somewhat...

you can google SEKI bear box locations... they are on a map ....

there are also web sites devoted to PCT/JMT hikers that relate to this issue...

Bill D.

Brian Lewis
(brianle) - F

Locale: Pacific NW
miles in the Sierras on 11/22/2013 11:18:03 MST Print View

Relating to this comment:
"Actually, if you can do 20 or 25 miles a day and are willing to camp at the existing bear boxes, then you don't need a bear canister at all."


Typically folks that are doing in the 20 - 25 MPD range in 'normal' terrain find themselves doing less through the Sierras in June. Snow, to include strategizing so as to not posthole a lot in the afternoons, plus the common strategy of "one pass per day" --- these tend to drop the daily mileage.

If beyond the slower-in-snow plus "try not to posthole much" and pass-distribution factors you add the requirement to sleep in one of the limited places that offer a bear locker, I think you end up with too many constraints. I would encourage you to carry a (large enough) canister. Mail it to KM (Kennedy Meadows) already pre-packed (carefully, densely) with food. Mail it home from, say, one of the towns you can hitch to from Sonora Pass.

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Re: Re: Re: bear can on 11/24/2013 07:12:53 MST Print View

"Actually, if you can do 20 or 25 miles a day and are willing to camp at the existing bear boxes, then you don't need a bear canister at all.

Last time I checked with SEKI thru hikers are allowed to use the steel bear boxes for overnight storage. Outside the bear canister required areas you are allowed to hang your food from trees... but that also limits your camp selections somewhat...

you can google SEKI bear box locations... they are on a map ....

there are also web sites devoted to PCT/JMT hikers that relate to this issue..."

A very strong THRU hiker can get through SEKI without a canister but few would be able to do North Yosemite in a day and there are no boxes.

Howie Schwartz
(howiemtnguide) - F - M

Locale: Eastern Sierra
Bear Canister on 02/13/2014 15:23:32 MST Print View

If you do go with a bear canister, we rent bearikade canisters at Sage to Summit in Bishop, CA. We also sell quite a few ultralight products if you need to resupply. www.sagetosummit.com.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Re: Re: Re: Re: bear can on 02/15/2014 07:07:51 MST Print View

kilt should be 1.9oz.
exoficio underwear should go in clothing worn.