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Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation please.
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Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation please. on 10/20/2013 19:59:11 MDT Print View

Can someone recommend me a dark/bittersweet chocolate that is less "melt prone" and thus, more pack worthy? Or are all chocolates about the same, melt wise? Being ignorant on the subject, I have been carrying dark chocolate M&Ms. The M&M chocolate is not of high quality, and too sweet for my taste, but makes less of a gooey mess than other attempts I've made. Alternatives I'm overlooking? Thanks.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation please. on 10/20/2013 20:39:40 MDT Print View

Do you have a down garment, quilt or sleeping bag in your pack?

Put the chocolate in the original packaging, into a Ziploc.

Wrap it with your down piece.

Won't melt.

Works in deserts too.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation please. on 10/20/2013 20:48:29 MDT Print View

Whatever happened to the Tropical Hershey Bar that we had 25 years ago? It would not melt on a bet.

Chocolate M&Ms are full of sugar and milk. That's OK if that is the way that you like it, but dark chocolate is healthier. Dark semi-sweet chocolate is good for me, but that is a baking chocolate. Bitter chocolate has more chocolate flavor, but it is not sweet at all.

Are you just trying to eat it, or are you trying to bake with it?

--B.G.--

Edited by --B.G.-- on 10/22/2013 00:01:24 MDT.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
eat it. on 10/20/2013 21:11:16 MDT Print View

I don't really enjoy the dark M&Ms either. Looking for an upgrade.

To answer the question: simply trying to eat it. No baking.

A no-melt or low-melt dark or bittersweet would be ideal.

Edited by Bolster on 10/20/2013 21:12:17 MDT.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: eat it. on 10/20/2013 21:21:25 MDT Print View

A google search turned up some November, 2012 blurbs on Cadbury developing a high temperature chocolate for the tropics, but I couldn't find anything recent.

Unless it's loaded with paraffin, real chocolate melts at somewhere around 87° +/-.
Or at least until the Cadbury shows up...

There are wax covered versions, but then you still have to chill it in a stream, and then deal with the wax.

Edited by greg23 on 10/20/2013 21:22:55 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: eat it. on 10/20/2013 21:41:34 MDT Print View

If you shop around the Trader Joe's stores, they sell chocolate, dark chocolate, and all sorts of chocolate in very large bars. You might sample those to see if one fits your trail requirements.

--B.G.--

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
TJ's on 10/20/2013 22:35:05 MDT Print View

+1 on Trader Joe's. Their "Pound Plus" (17.6 ounce = 500 grams) Belgian chocolate bars are good quality but reasonably priced. Also, being so big and thick, they stand up to more physical abuse. Having toted them a lot of places, the dark chocolate bars don't melt nearly as easily as a Hershey's milk chocolate. And they taste a lot better.

Nutrition Facts from the "Dark Chocolate" package (although we live 1400 miles from the nearest TJ's, we keep them in stock in our pantry):

Serving: 3 squares = 38 grams = 1.3 ounces. Servings per package: 13+; calories: 220, fat calories: 110. Minimum 54% cocoa solids.

So 1.1 pounds gives you 2900 calories. That's pretty dense.

They also have milk chocolate (not my preference), dark chocolate with almonds (pretty good) and, I think, a bitter-sweet..

Also, +1 on Nate's ideas about insulating your foods in your sleeping bag. This works amazing well and I use that trick to transport frozen salmon on 12-hour journeys without an ice chest in addition to keeping cheeses and chocolate cool on a backpacking trip. If you're at altitude with big diurnal temperature swings, you can cool the food down again each night (shade it from the morning sun) and be good for another day. Since your first night's meal is only carried for one day, it can be something like homemade caribou or bear stew, frozen solid. That, in the middle of your sleeping bag can in turn keep lots of other "luxury" (but highly caloric) things cool for early in your trip. As discussed in other threads, any cured meat (salami, hot dogs, bacon) is fine for days near room temperature. Roast beef, turkey breast, fried chicken, etc, keep for a few days if cool. Fully refrigerating them isn't necessary.

edited to add: Delmar is in the "Inland Empire" which close to TJs started. You can't swing a NeoAir without hitting a Trader Joe's. Just follow all the Priuses.

Edited by DavidinKenai on 10/20/2013 22:38:22 MDT.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Thanks on 10/21/2013 00:03:44 MDT Print View

You're right...what I thought was a Prius dealership in town, upon closer inspection, is in fact a Trader Joe's. I'll take my reusable hemp shopping bag, electric scooter on down to TJs, wade through the throngs of soccer moms and fitness gurus, and find these pound plus bars of sweet, dark calories that you mention. Thanks for the recommendation.

You guys have some serious stones to wrap a chocolate bar inside your sleeping bag. That takes more faith than I can muster in my packing abilities. I have terrible premonitions of melted chocolate all over my RevX quilt, and I can't get it out of my head. Yes, I ordered my quilt with a brown interior, but it wasn't camouflaging chocolate I had in mind.

Edited by Bolster on 10/21/2013 00:09:14 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Thanks on 10/21/2013 00:15:42 MDT Print View

"Trader Joe's"

Delmar, in that store, the chocolate is one aisle over from the organic okra and two aisles over from the free-range tofu.

--B.G.--

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Re: Re: Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation please. on 10/21/2013 05:56:28 MDT Print View

"Whatever happened to the Tropical Hersey Bar that we had 25 years ago? It would not melt on a bet."

Let me see if I can find out. I have "inside sources"

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation please. on 10/21/2013 07:01:35 MDT Print View

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=3557

Ike Jutkowitz
(Ike) - M

Locale: Central Michigan
Dark Chocolate on 10/21/2013 11:03:13 MDT Print View

93

Hot mug of whiskey sold separately

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Chocolate and Melt-ability on 10/21/2013 12:36:55 MDT Print View

Actually, there are radical differences between types of dark/semi-sweet chocolate. This has to do with ratios of cacao...you will see a "percentage" of cocoa listed on some dark chocolate (Trader Joe's has several brands with 70% or higher, as does Lindt, Ghirardelli, etc.).

The higher the percentage of cocoa, the less the percentage of cocoa fat, and therefore, the less "melty" the chocolate will be. [Personally, I don't care much for this more brittle/grainy texture, because for me, chocolate all about the slow melting in one's mouth. But MANY people adore the higher percentage choc.s, and I admit that they usually have a nice, less sweet, flavor balance.]

So a 70% or even an 80% chocolate might be just what you're looking for...

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Dark Chocolate on 10/21/2013 12:43:34 MDT Print View

I would suggest Ike's approach or the TJ's option. From Wikipedia concerning the original mil-spec, high-temp chocolate bar (the 1980's Tropical Choolate we sold in BPing stores wasn't as bad):

"Colonel Logan had specified that the D ration taste only a bit better than "a boiled potato." This last requirement was imposed to keep soldiers from snacking on their emergency rations in non-emergency situations. As a result, the D ration was almost universally detested for its bitter taste by U.S. troops, and was often discarded instead of consumed when issued. Troops called the D ration "Hitler's Secret Weapon" for its effect on soldiers' intestinal tracts. It could not be eaten at all by soldiers with poor dentition, and even those with good dental work often found it necessary to first shave slices off the bar with a knife before consuming."

This reminds me of one of favorite emergency ration suggestions. Obviously, in a bush plane in Alaska, you should have emergency supplies. It's a state law. Really. And until 9-11, you were REQUIRED to have a gun on a small plane. Anyway, an author on surviving a forced landing pointed out that if you keep a few Snickers bars in your plane, you'll eat them as a snack and not have them when you really need them. He suggested dog biscuits. They last forever, have no water weight, no special storage requirements and are made with mostly food-grade stuff. Cheap, too. And you won't eat them until you really need to.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Dark Chocolate on 10/21/2013 12:48:49 MDT Print View

If you look at "regular" chocolate, first ingredient is sugar. Maybe that's okay for quick energy but I like dark better. But higher cocoa butter would be good.


I think you can make chocolate less melty by tempering it. Heat it to some temperature then quickly cool it or something. Maybe someone knows how to do this.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Re: Dark Chocolate on 10/21/2013 12:54:58 MDT Print View

Actually Jerry, you need lower, not higher, cocoa butter -- cocoa butter is the "melty" part of chocolate. You need higher cocoa (solids).

Tempering chocolate will not affect its melting point. Tempering is done to create a more attractive shine on chocolate, and to prevent "bloom" (that unappealing white stuff that appears on chocolate when it's been exposed to the wrong temperatures).

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation on 10/21/2013 14:01:33 MDT Print View

Green & Black's!!!

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation on 10/21/2013 14:15:31 MDT Print View

The OP asks -
"Can someone recommend me a dark/bittersweet chocolate that is less "melt prone..."

Is there something unique about Green & Blacks?

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation please. on 10/21/2013 15:06:12 MDT Print View

Nick had it right= ZipLok and insulate, he hikes in the desert!

Milk chocolate melts at +/- 84*

The better Dark Chocolates melts +/- 93*

So it would be best to go with the better Darks.

I have taste tested about every brand/type of 70% to 99% on the market in the Seattle area for taste and found that I prefer 78% to 85%. Any lower and it is too sweet and waxy; and higher gets a little bitter. I also found that the most expensive brands are not always the best tasting, in fact the two on the top of my list are Trader Joe's Chocolate Lover's 85% (has a nice fruity bouquet) at $1.49 and Safeway Select 78% (just the right amount of sugar) at $2.69. These both taste best to me, better even than the $8 SCHARFFEN BERGER. Yes I have bought every bar at PCC, Whole Foods, World Market, QFC, Trader Joes, Freddy's, Safeway, Amazon and the specialty shops. I was trying to find the very best tasting bar.

Maybe the Ghirardelli bars might work for you; they use a Soy Lecithin as an emulsifier (they taste waxy, kind of like the wax lips we ate as kids- I hated them even as a kid) and with the emulsifier it might not melt as easy; kind of like a McDonalds shake on a warm day, still thick even when warm.
I personally would take my chances with a better tasting option though.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Dark Chocolate on 10/21/2013 15:42:55 MDT Print View

Thanks Valerie, I've wondered about tempering...

You must know something about making deserts : )

Sharon J.
(squark) - F

Locale: SF Bay area
Re: Re: Dark or bittersweet chocolate recommendation please. on 10/21/2013 16:00:45 MDT Print View

Another big fan of Trader Joe's chocolate selection here. Tastewise, I'm also pretty happy with Theo or Green and Black's. Endangered Species also has some good flavors. Oh, and Valrhona. Who am I kidding - if it's above 70% cocoa and on sale, I'll buy it.

re melting: I took a bar of Trader Joe's Chocolate Lover's 85% on my last trip. It melted in the bear can while I was hiking. Once it cooled at night it was a weird gritty/chalky texture. I still ate it, of course, but would urge caution with the melting-recooling method suggested.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Choc Hunter on 10/21/2013 17:01:30 MDT Print View

>...in fact the two on the top of my list are Trader Joe's Chocolate Lover's 85% (has a nice fruity bouquet) at $1.49 and Safeway Select 78% (just the right amount of sugar) at $2.69. .... Yes I have bought every bar at PCC, Whole Foods, World Market, QFC, Trader Joes, Freddy's, Safeway, Amazon and the specialty shops. I was trying to find the very best tasting bar.

Awesome, thanks for the recommendations. Good to get the results of a dedicated chocolate hunter.

Leigh Baker
(leighb) - F

Locale: Northeast Texas Pineywoods
RE: dark chocolate on 10/21/2013 17:37:06 MDT Print View

I just love how a thread on dark chocolate can go 2 pages :-)
Agree with others, the higher the cacao, the less melt prone.
@Ike, Love Chocolove w/almonds and seasalt!! Only 55% cocoa, but still one of my favorites! Green & Blacks also good and can be found almost anywhere. Sharffen berger very good too! I love the dark chocolates with cayenne. Also love to put a pinch of it in hot cocoa.

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Dark German chocolate on 10/21/2013 23:49:14 MDT Print View

My mother-in-law sends me care packages of dark German chocolate straight from Germany.. I can no longer eat Hershey's. ;)

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Hershey's on 10/22/2013 09:17:22 MDT Print View

Hey, even without the German chocolate comparison, Hershey's is only marginally edible. Even my 9-year-old daughter complains if I give her a Hershey's, asking "where's the DARK chocolate, did you eat it?"

(Yes.)

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Choc Hunter on 10/22/2013 09:24:15 MDT Print View

Taza makes some mighty fine chocolates. I buy them at my local organic grocer.

http://www.tazachocolate.com/store/mexicanchocolate

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Choc Hunter on 10/22/2013 10:32:38 MDT Print View

"You're right...what I thought was a Prius dealership in town, upon closer inspection, is in fact a Trader Joe's." "Free range tofu" etc etc

Now that's funny!

For an overnighter, you could freeze the bar to get more mileage out of it. If it does melt, you can put it in a zip lock and soak in the creek. As mentioned above, it'll be a bit chalky

Pmags,

The only reason I survived my move from Germany back to the U.S. is because of the microbrew explosion of the '90s. I'm envious that you have a German connection for chocolate.

Edited by IDBLOOM on 10/22/2013 10:33:11 MDT.

James Klein
(jnklein21) - M

Locale: Southeast
Tempering Dark Chocolate on 10/22/2013 18:18:30 MDT Print View

Tempering dark chocolate can increase the temp at which it melts to ~90-95F. Non tempered dark chocolate will start to melt 75.

Tempering changes the crystalline structure of the solidified fat solids. The new/improved crystal structure (post temper) has the silky smooth texture good darks are known for and has a higher melting temp.

This is similar to the process for heat treating metals to obtain desirable material properties.

Most dark chocolate will be already tempered. Exposing tempered chocolate to temps near melting point will begin to reverse the temper allowing the poor crystalline structure to return. Chocolate that has lost its temper is said to have "bloomed". This results in the powdery texture and color. This can be fixed be redoing the temper.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Dark Chocolate on 10/22/2013 18:38:11 MDT Print View

Anyway, an author on surviving a forced landing pointed out that if you keep a few Snickers bars in your plane, you'll eat them as a snack and not have them when you really need them. He suggested dog biscuits. They last forever, have no water weight, no special storage requirements and are made with mostly food-grade stuff. Cheap, too. And you won't eat them until you really need to.

Ha! I received similar advice from a community ed. course on backpacking a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. Teacher advocated bringing emergency rations on any trek where you'd be more than couple days from help. His suggestion was dried dog food ... for the same reasons David noted. His personal preference was Gravy Train brand.

Jeremy and Angela
(requiem) - F - M

Locale: Northern California
Re: Tempering Dark Chocolate on 10/22/2013 19:40:28 MDT Print View

The tempering process is also a bit delicate; you'll want to obtain a good quality thermometer as you're learning.

Short version: heat high enough to obliterate the existing crystal structure (say 120F), cool down to about 80F and optionally "seed" with an existing chunk of tempered chocolate while stirring, finally raise to about 89 for dipping/pouring. (If it gets to 91 you get to start over!)

My dad dug up an old family recipe for chocolates some years back, and has been practicing candy-making since then. For this post I Googled some of the numbers though.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Tempering Dark Chocolate on 10/22/2013 19:44:54 MDT Print View

so, is there any value to prevent melting in warm weather?

James Klein
(jnklein21) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Re: Re: Tempering Dark Chocolate on 10/22/2013 21:20:02 MDT Print View

If you buy new dark chocolate, then I don't think tempering will improve it any as it is already tempered. And likely better than you'd be able to do at home.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Re: Re: Re: Tempering Dark Chocolate on 10/23/2013 09:47:55 MDT Print View

+1 with James -- what you buy in the stores is already tempered, and trying to re-temper it is an exercise in futility (plus you risk ruining it if your technique is bad!).

Jerry, to answer your question -- no, there is no value to re-tempering ready-to-eat chocolate.

Back to the OP's original thread question -- if it's really hot out, don't bring chocolate, or bake it into cookies where the melting won't be as nasty, or double/triple bag it and pack it into your sleeping bag.

In any case, as already stated, the higher ratio cocoa solids:cocoa butter bars will be more resistant to melting, and also less sweet (which the OP prefers).

Personally, since I live in the scorching-hot desert, I only bring chocolate in the winter.

Delmar -- not sure if you like shortbread cookies, but I have successfully made dark chocolate-stuffed shortbread. Not too sweet (very buttery), and the cookie outside protects the chocolate inside. Extremely rich, but you're backpacking, right? ;~)

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Re: Re: Tempering Dark Chocolate on 10/23/2013 10:06:19 MDT Print View

I didn't mean to disrespectfully doubt you, Valerie, maybe there's some obscure benefit even if the melting temperature is the same or whatever

And maybe it would stimulate someone to say something interesting

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
No Worries... on 10/23/2013 10:18:48 MDT Print View

Jerry -- no worries, man - I didn't take your question as disrespectful! :~) More than one source is good!

But James was on-point when he noted that the chocolate you buy in stores is already factory-tempered (better than we'd do at home). I doubt anyone here is buying untempered bulk chocolate in blocks for eating.

In any case, the whole tempering process would only change the melting point of chocolate by a degree or two; i.e., not enough to make a significant difference when backpacking... which, I think, was the purpose of the OP's thread.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: No Worries... on 10/23/2013 10:48:54 MDT Print View

okay, I had to wikipedia it

there are 6 crystal types of chocolate with different melting temperatures:

I 17 °C (63 °F)
II 21 °C (70 °F)
III 26 °C (79 °F)
IV 28 °C (82 °F)
V 34 °C (93 °F)
VI 36 °C (97 °F)

You want type V for deserts. Tempering makes it type V. First you heat to 113 F to completely melt, then cool to 81 F which allows type IV and V to form. Then heat it to 88F to melt the type IV. Then let just type V crystalize.

I see what you mean, too complicated, just buy it already tempered.

If you could create type VI, then you'de be a bit better at not melting. They said it's hard and takes weeks to form. Maybe "hard" makes it unpleasant to eat? Heat it to 113 F, then cool to 95 F and let if sit at that temperature for weeks to crystalize. Maybe that's what tropical chocalate is?

Now, how does percent cacao fit into this? Tempering must just be for the cocao butter. I wonder what having cacao in the mix does? Does it affect the melting temperature of the cocoa butter?

hmmm... maybe too much analysis : )

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
LOL, Too Much Analysis is Right! on 10/23/2013 13:06:13 MDT Print View

LOL, Too Much Analysis is Right!

The fancy chocolate bars of eating chocolate are tempered and made to melt in the 90sF.

Above all, we eat chocolate for pleasure, and one of the most pleasurable things about it is that chocolate melts easily in the mouth, sending a slow stream of yumminess to your tastebuds. (And if any of you aren't eating chocolate for the joy of it, I don't want to know!)

Even if you could make a chocolate that melted at 130F, it would be a lousy eating experience, because it wouldn't melt in your mouth!

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Chocolate on 10/25/2013 23:49:28 MDT Print View

Valerie -- yes, I'd be very interested to hear how you make chocolate-in-shortbread cookies.

(Gollum voice:) And no, we don't eat chocolate so it melts in our mouthes, we stores it in the freezer so it crunches between our teethses!

Is there anything better than frozen dark chocolate? I can't think of any. But I'll make do with soft chocolate on the trail, if I must. Is it OK to admit I like a waxy chocolate?

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Chocolate-Filled Shortbread Cookies on 10/26/2013 10:44:23 MDT Print View

I first had these at a bakery in my native Montreal...extremely delicious, inordinately rich, and fattening beyond all reason. In other words, pretty good for backpacking! ;~)

Make your favourite shortbread cookie dough (the kind that you roll out, not a "drop cookie" version). I like the ones with some cornstarch added for a finer crumb, like this one: http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2009/08/shortbread-cookies/

Roll the dough out fairly thinly (+/- 1/4"), and cut into rectangles large enough to fit a nice piece of chocolate on half of each rectangle, with some room around the edges. [Tip: working with cold dough will be much easier, so you may have to put it in the fridge periodically if it gets too warm.]

Cut pieces of dark chocolate (from a chocolate bar, so it's thin enough to fit inside the cookie) - slightly smaller than half your dough rectangle.

Place a piece of chocolate on half of each piece of dough, and carefully fold the dough over and press the edges to seal in the chocolate.

Bake according to the recipe directions. Then -- hah! -- try to taste just one of them, while keeping your paws off the rest until you go backpacking.

And it's TOTALLY ok (with me, anyway) to admit that you like ANY kind of chocolate!

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Chocolate-Filled Shortbread Cookies on 10/26/2013 12:13:17 MDT Print View

"Cut pieces of dark chocolate (from a chocolate bar, so it's thin enough to fit inside the cookie) - slightly smaller than half your dough rectangle."

I wonder if dark chocolate chips would work?

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Re: Chocolate Chips on 10/26/2013 13:25:32 MDT Print View

Doug, one CAN use chocolate chips, but the texture of the chocolate inside is not quite as good. (Sort of like using chocolate chips to make a chocolate croissant vs. the real French way where they put a piece of dark chocolate bar inside -- just that bit better!)

But hey, in a pinch, chocolate is still chocolate, right? :~)

Richard Gless
(rgless) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Best Chocolate and storage on 10/26/2013 13:42:57 MDT Print View

My favorite backpacking chocolate is RitterSport German chocolate. It's available in some specialty stores in the US. Lots of flavors and varieties.

I've stored chocolate bars in a bag in my sleeping bag (per the suggestion above) for many, many years and never had problems with leakage or significant melting on many multiday Sierra trips. Keep the pack in the shade when you're not hiking.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Chocolate chunks from TJ's on 10/29/2013 23:21:14 MDT Print View

Some of you sent me to TJs to check the chocolate. While there I discovered packages of chocolate chunks (next to the chocolate chips) and WOW are they great. Higher percentage cocoa than the Pound Plus bars, and quite a bit less expensive by weight. Haven't heat tested it yet. Can't seem to get it to stay in the house long enough to get tested...

Edited by Bolster on 10/29/2013 23:21:44 MDT.