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Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: CRI is Important on 10/17/2013 13:17:53 MDT Print View

Can't yoiu 'see' better because one picture is with a 100 lumen bulb and the other is 140 lumens?

Joe S
(ThreeRidges) - M
Fenix HL21 on 10/17/2013 19:15:08 MDT Print View

Does it for me. Got it on sale for less than $30, so very happy.

J C
(Joomy) - M
Zebra H52 on 10/17/2013 19:24:12 MDT Print View

Well I just pre-ordered a Zebralight H52Fw. Price + a set of Eneloops and a charger should be not much over $100. There was no High-CRI option, but if one becomes available I may get another one.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Re: Re: CRI is Important on 10/17/2013 21:15:55 MDT Print View

> Can't yoiu 'see' better because one picture is with a 100 lumen bulb and the other is 140 lumens?

Probably not -- the camera's auto exposure will make the two exposures appear similar. What you should notice is the "flatness" of the traditional LED, and the more natural look of the high CRI.

JC, the "w" series (w = "white" or "warm") are higher CRI than the standard "cool," you will very likely be pleased at the natural rendition of the "w". And the "w" gives you a few more lumens than the "c", to boot.

I own Petzels and Fenixes, and they're good lights, but they got retired to the automobiles for backup duty after I discovered warm and/or high CRI lights. I won't buy anything but, and will likely never go back. Someday, every LED you buy will be high CRI. But for now, it's a specialty market.

Edited by Bolster on 10/17/2013 21:29:47 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: CRI is Important on 10/17/2013 22:07:02 MDT Print View

"Probably not -- the camera's auto exposure will make the two exposures appear similar."

Good Grief! That's why they invented manual exposure mode on a camera.

--B.G.--

Aaron Smith
(Aaronsmity)
Stock? on 10/18/2013 08:24:45 MDT Print View

Where do you find stock for these zebralights? They are all out of stock, backordered or for pre-order only unless you want discontinued models.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Stock? on 10/18/2013 13:03:49 MDT Print View

"Where do you find stock for these zebralights?"

Zebralights has everything except for a few days here and there. Sometimes they are sold on Amazon.com but there are more days here and there.

The last time that I ordered one, I had it in my hands 48 hours later.

--B.G.--

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
Best Headlamp on 10/18/2013 15:48:15 MDT Print View

>> Where do you find stock for these zebralights? <<

Unfortunately your timing is bad. Zebralight has just released a few new products and when they do this they move their existing stock to dis-continued sales. The pre-order is for those people that want to get their hands on the first run of the new models. The first run will typically sell out quickly and then you are into back-order for a while until they catch up.

It's a bit of a marketing game but I must say, with the speed at which LED light technology is changing, I don't blame these manufactures for being a bit shy about ordering large stock quantities. It must be tough keeping ahead of the competition.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Two is one on 10/18/2013 16:03:25 MDT Print View

"I do think the Princeton Tec EOS is also pretty bombproof - got it at REI as well."

+1

Has anybody here besides me tried the VIZZ? It's not the lightest light around, but it is bomber, like all PT lights, and has an excellent feature set. I was very impressed with it this season. A worthy successor to the venerable EOS.

From REI:

Description

•Single 165-lumen Maxbright LED throws a bright white beam up to 90m on high; 2 white 5mm LEDs? output 30 lumens? and reach up to 23m on high
•Also includes 2 red LEDs? that output 15 lumens? and reach up to 20m.; red LEDs? minimize the impact on your night vision
•White 5mm LEDs? are dimmable so you can balance light output and battery life to meet your needs
•3 AAA batteries (included) provide 110 hrs. of burn time for the Maxbright LED; using the 5mm white LEDs?, the batteries provide 160 hrs. of operation
•Switch to the red LEDs? and the batteries will last for 150 hrs.
•Regulated circuitry ensures consistent power output over the lifespan of the batteries
•Large push-button switch is easy to operate with gloves on
•The Princeton Tec Vizz headlamp has an IPX7? rating (protected against water immersion down to 1m for 30 min.)



Made in USA.


The specs don't copy well, but the one downside is that it weighs 3.7 oz with alkaline batteries, according to the official specs. Mine weighs 3.0 oz with lithium batteries.
An excellent option, IME/IMO.

James Couch
(JBC) - M

Locale: Cascade Mountains
Re: Vizz on 10/18/2013 16:12:56 MDT Print View

Picked one up this spring. It has become my goto light for climbing. Very lightweight for it's output and runtime.

Jeremy and Angela
(requiem) - F - M

Locale: Northern California
Re: Re: CRI is Important on 10/18/2013 16:29:35 MDT Print View

Can't yoiu 'see' better because one picture is with a 100 lumen bulb and the other is 140 lumens?

In this case, it appears the high CRI bulb is the 100 lumen one, so the "better" results are with the dimmer bulb.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Vizz on 10/18/2013 16:54:55 MDT Print View

"It has become my goto light for climbing. Very lightweight for it's output and runtime."

+1 Wish I'd had one back in the day.

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
Best Headlamp on 10/18/2013 16:56:36 MDT Print View

While I like a good headlight, sometimes the best light isn't in a headlight format.

I picked up this headband a while back and it's been quite good. The headband has a velcro closure to fit any size head and small elastic pockets that can hold most small handheld lights (up to about 3/4 inch diameter) which allows it to become a pretty decent headlight. It's nice to be able to have a handheld and headlight option with the same light.

I throw the strap in my pack on trips (fishing trips mostly) when I carry a small handheld light but might occasionally need hands-free operation. The strap has two elastic flashlight loops, a larger diameter one sits on top of the smaller diameter loop. I can fit my Zebralight AA flashlight in the larger loop and my 4sevens Preon AAA light in the smaller loop. A do-it yourself project could make it much lighter but since it only cost me $4 (at MEC) and weighs 1 oz. it wasn't worth the effort for me to do it myself.

Headlight strap1

Headband2

headband3

Edited by skopeo on 10/19/2013 01:06:54 MDT.

Eric Osburn
(osb40000) - MLife
Re: Re: Two is one on 10/18/2013 22:18:44 MDT Print View

I have an EOS and I have a Fenix HL30. I use the HL30 with sanyo enloops and the run time is pretty amazing, much much longer than the EOS with similar levels of output. The HL30 isn't super light but I also rarely carry an extra set of batteries since the run times are so solid.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: Re: Two is one on 10/18/2013 22:22:21 MDT Print View

Amazing, Longer, Solid....


Got any numbers?

Eric Osburn
(osb40000) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: Two is one on 10/18/2013 22:43:18 MDT Print View

Google is your friend.

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?294901-Princeton-Tec-EOS-Review

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?353158-Fenix-HL30-Review-(2xAA)



^ The Princeton is using outdated tech. Based on my findings, using sanyo enloops in both, the Fenix has significantly longer run times while at the same time having a brighter beam.

The one thing I like better about the Princeton is the screw to close the battery latch, other than that the fenix wins hands down. For the most part I use the medium setting which I find is plenty, the low setting is nice while trying to find something in a tent or read a map without being blinded.

If you're looking for super light there are better options but they will come with compromises as well. The Fenix is also fairly cheap.

I'm always looking for new lights though so I'll be checking this thread often.

Edited by osb40000 on 10/18/2013 23:19:54 MDT.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
DavidT Carry on 10/18/2013 22:54:20 MDT Print View

This is known as "DavidT Carry" over at CPF. It's an alternate carry rig for a headlamp, specifically a Zebralight. It weighs 0.2 oz for the band, which is a flat boot lace, a Walgreen's elasticized Finger Sleeve, and a cordlock. With the (vintage) H50 light and no battery, this rig weighs 1.0 oz. Add a lithium AA and you're up to 1.6 oz total.

Dual usage, of course, on the lace, sleeve, and cordlock, if needed. (Lace can come in darned handy for a bow saw.)

If you wanted to get even more minimalist, you might be able to replace the finger sleeve with two o-rings, but I haven't tried it.

It can be used around the forehead like a traditional headlamp, but it's also very useful worn loosely around the neck, which is how I often carry this. And unlike the stock head band, you can easily wind it up and stick it in a pocket.

DavidT

PS: Not sure Walgreen's carries the elasticized finger sleeves anymore. But Amazon does.

PPS: Those of you who are Zebra enthusiasts will certainly have a good joke at my old H50, Zebralight's first headlamp. The reason I keep it around is, I like the old style lock-out twisty switch, which is great for travel. You can't turn it on accidentally. I once turned on a H501 in my pocket by mistake and it got too hot to touch. The H502 has a recessed switch and is very unlikely to accidentally switch on, but the old H50 is foolproof. Sadly, the H50 beam is pre-w and pre-c, so it has that flat tint--which is OK for reading in a taxi cab, the main job of this travel setup. For backpacking, I switch out for an H501w or an H502c.

Edited by Bolster on 10/18/2013 23:14:24 MDT.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: DavidT Carry on 10/19/2013 07:22:04 MDT Print View

Good headlamps that use 2 batteries? I like to use rechargeable batteries most of the time and most head lamps that I know of use 3 or 1 battery which makes charging annoying.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: DavidT Carry on 10/19/2013 08:07:27 MDT Print View

Princeton Tec Byte is one.

Until recently parasitic drain was an issue, but supposedly it is fixed in the current version.

Edited by greg23 on 10/19/2013 08:09:23 MDT.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Re: DavidT Carry on 10/19/2013 08:24:45 MDT Print View

Thank you Greg.