MYOG: Contoured Side Panels for Improved Load Carry in Frameless Packs
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Adrian MITCHELL
(adie.mitchell)

Locale: Northwest Mass
examples on 10/17/2013 17:52:36 MDT Print View

this guy has nice details on a couple of packs with side panels shaped like Dave describes. I am sure this guy must be on BPL, not sure who he is though.

http://outlivingblog.wordpress.com/2013/01/31/new-packs/

note even the larger, twin stay, pack has the stepped panel design.

Adie

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Framless packs, the "undead pack" on 10/22/2013 14:12:36 MDT Print View

To me a frameless pack is best reserved for daypacks of not more than 20 liters.

The small weight of the two ovaled aluminum tubes in my old REI Cruise UL 60 is a "price" I'm willing to pay for load transfer to my padded waistbelt (yet another small weight price). The comfort and weight off my shoulders and thus my spinal column is a necessity for me.

Adding side panels to a frameless backpack is interesting but the added weight would be better spent on at least a single, contoured, vertical aluminum stay for weight transfer. I prefer two stays for best comfort and pack contour.

The side panels don't transfer weight but merely create some form to the pack. After reading the article I still cannot see much advantage of side panels over, say, side compression straps. Packs without frames and with side panels can still "barrel" down the back.

P.S. I contend (yet once again) that my idea of creating two internal or external fabric tubes sewn to the pack to contain the rolled upper and lower CFC matress halves will give a fairly rigid but forgiving "frame" to a framless pack. Plus it creates a grooove right over the spine for comfort and airflow.

Edited by Danepacker on 10/22/2013 14:21:50 MDT.

Maurice Ostrov
(garraty) - MLife
the simple design is best for me on 10/26/2013 09:27:14 MDT Print View

I have used what is basically a sack with shoulder straps and hip belt for many thousands of miles. I keep the total weight under 32 lbs, usually well below, and pack it tightly. The weight transfers well to the hip belt.
It is true that the pack is somewhat like a tube and that it is not tight against my back except near the center and it is especially far from my back near the top. But it is close enough and it is stable. And it provides space for a little ventilation.

A straight sack lets me easily pack with my stuff inside a tube formed by a foam pad.

I find the little bit of ventilation that is provided by a pack shaped somewhat like a tube to be very important.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: examples on 10/26/2013 10:37:38 MDT Print View

this guy has nice details on a couple of packs with side panels shaped like Dave describes. I am sure this guy must be on BPL, not sure who he is though.

Mystery man is Brenden Swihart.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/profile.html?u=brendans