Late December Snowshoe and Backpacking in Colorado
Display Avatars Sort By:
Jing Yan
(yj20003018) - F

Locale: Newark, DE
Late December Snowshoe and Backpacking in Colorado on 10/11/2013 15:26:50 MDT Print View

My friends and I have been planning to have a 3-5 days backpacking and snowshoe trip to Colorado at the end of December. We decided to focus on the trails around RMNP or several sections of CDT. We are not going to try high altitude peaks, especially 14ers. We just want to having some fun with snow and enjoy the trip. But we are worried about there will be too much snow, even with snowshoe would not be a good choice. So anyone got some recommendations on which area we are going?

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
RMNP on 10/28/2013 13:52:05 MDT Print View

I suggest the RMNP for starters. It's not as remote as most parts of the CDT ot Colorado Trail and not as high in most acessable places. (Check for permits if necessary.)

And please rent and carry a rescue beacon. Pay for Colorado rescue insurance to avoid having a big bill in the unlukely event you do need SAR services.

Plus some of you should take an Avalanche 1 course. All of you should have collapsable aluminum shovels. These may possibly be rented. Check around at places like REI and Neptune Mountaineering in Boulder.

Do some "backyard campouts" to be sure you know your equipment limits (and yours) if you are not experienced snow campers.

Randy Martin
(randalmartin) - F

Locale: Colorado
Lost Creek Wilderness and Buffalo Peaks Wilderness on 10/28/2013 15:07:22 MDT Print View

LCW is a nice choice because it is lower in altitude and and therefore offers a better shot at less severe conditions. Elevation is in the 8-10k range for most of the area. The Goose Creek Loop is about 26 miles and has stunning scenery. Another good choice is the Buffalo Peaks wilderness which has a 28 mile loop that circumnavigates the twin West/East Buffalo Peaks. The trail is fairly mellow in terms of elevation gain/loss but is a bit higher in the 9-11kft range.