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Mike Schasch
(MSchasch) - F
training on 12/29/2013 22:39:36 MST Print View

Cool to see some San Gabriel photos up there. I was in Palmdale for Christmas visiting the folks. Hiked the Mount Emmas with my dad one day, ran into some guys smoking meth near one of the summits.....ahhh Palmdale. For that same week I got in a 9.5 miler (half of which I spent lost in the snow), a 5.5 miler on a wonderful new to me trail in St George, and a 16 miler for a long run.

I applaud those who were able to get any real distance in this week with all the holidays and laziness. I got in two 4 mile runs while I was still in California, an icy canyoneering hike in Zion - 8 miles/2500 ft of gain, and a 12 mile snow run on a groomed trail in Park City today.

No running pics but here are some canyoneering photos from the other day: https://picasaweb.google.com/107561442771983387605/Mystery

Happy Birthday dudes!

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Happy New Year! on 01/05/2014 08:09:30 MST Print View

best wishes to everyone! I started off the new year w/ a 14 mile (2014) run, temps were great, mid 30's, trail conditions were challenging w/ lots of ice, but other stretches that were perfectly dry- I ran the entire route in micropikes as the conditions changed too rapidly, the spikes performed flawlessly

week was 0/0/14/6/strength/15/0 for a total of 35 miles

 photo microspikes_zps7bec5bd5.jpg

 photo mirkwood_zpsfdc89b14.jpg

looking east towards the Elkhorns

 photo lookingeast_zps885b9742.jpg

looking north towards the Big Belts

 photo lookingnorth_zpsd64d11ab.jpg

Art ...
(asandh) - F
Re: Happy New Year! on 01/05/2014 08:41:06 MST Print View

Happy New Year to Everyone,
Whatever you decide to run.

looking strong Mike, did you decide the screws weren't good enough ?

I'm officially back up to 40 mile weeks,
but was supposed to do a 22 miler yesterday and copped out for a 10 miler with lots of gain. so as soon as I finish this coffee I'm out the door for a make-up 11-12 miler.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
screws on 01/05/2014 08:59:45 MST Print View

Art- most of the winter the screws are sufficient, but when you get a lot glazed ice they just don't cut it- the microspikes dig deeply into the ice allowing you to run across anything

I prefer running w/o the spikes, but they are a godsend when you need them :)

Mike

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
ice stache on 01/05/2014 11:34:49 MST Print View

pic from post yesterday's run :)

 photo icestache_zps82d44e49.jpg

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: ice stache on 01/05/2014 11:45:53 MST Print View

RAD!!!

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
New Shoe Quiver... on 01/05/2014 13:47:06 MST Print View

I have a pair of NB MT20v2 on the way…Heading out to pick up a pair of Inov8 Trailroc 255s this afternoon.
Looking to change my quiver up a little bit.

I've been going long in a pair of NB110s or Brooks Cascadia 7s. The 110s are about worn out and the Cascadias are not my first choice (too much heel), but I got them for free. Looking to get a little more nimble and less drop with the Trailroc 255s. Hopefully I'll be happy with these as my distance shoe.

The MT20s will be my <12 mile shoe (I love minimal but I've found that's about my tolerance level before the lack of support/rock plate starts causing foot issues). I had a few pairs of MT10s back in the day…hands down, my favorite shoe ever for short distances. I wish the durability were higher, but I suppose it comes with the territory for a shoe that feels like a sock.

I really want to try a pair of Trailroc 150s but nobody around here stocks them.

What are all of you liking these days?

Ozzy McKinney
(PorcupinePhobia) - F

Locale: PNW
footwear quiver on 01/05/2014 15:30:50 MST Print View

I have a pair of Bedrock Earthquakes that I really like, but for really wet/rocky stuff I've been using a pair of MYOG 10mm huaraches with canvas tops that are nice and non-slip next to skin.

Winters are pretty mild up here in the Puget Sound, so dealing with ice and snow is usually optional- stay low. On 30-40 degree days where I know I'm going to be soaked and chilly, I wear some Costco wool socks that I chopped and sewed into "lobster socks" to wear with sandals.

Edited by PorcupinePhobia on 01/05/2014 17:52:39 MST.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Re: New Shoe Quiver... on 01/05/2014 15:55:03 MST Print View

Craig- I've been having good luck w/ either the PI Trail N1's or N2's (N2's if it's rockier terrain), I have been wanting to try a pair of Inov-8's for awhile (my wife is using a pair of 245's), but haven't yet

Mike

Art ...
(asandh) - F
Re: Re: New Shoe Quiver... on 01/05/2014 16:51:08 MST Print View

my current two shoes of choice are :

Cascadia 7 - yes they are "tanks" as Craig described them once, but they are built for long mileage, meaning more than 50 miles. I feel very protected in them, but yes I do also feel a bit slow and heavy in them.

Pearl Izumi Peak II - no longer made, these are the predecessors to the N1 and N2.
I love running in them for 20 miles or less, they almost make me feel like a runner.
I've used them on a nonstop 45 miler in the Sierra, and on the J-Tree run last spring.
50 miles is probably their limit for a run, but they might handle a multi day fast pack that is longer.

Looking forward to trying out the PI N2's and hoping they somehow meld what is best about the above two models.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re: Re: New Shoe Quiver... on 01/05/2014 17:01:12 MST Print View

I really wanted the Inov8 Trailroc 255s to work, but trying them on again today, they just are a little weird in the toe for me.

I guess I'll be sticking with the Cascadia 7s for a little longer. Might go ahead and try the Cascadia 9s when I wear them out- supposed to have a little less drop than previous models.

The Cascadias are an awesome shoe- very comfortable, I've done some long runs and a good deal of backpacking in them. Like you said Art, they really shine when miles start getting high. I just wish they had a little less stack height.

Art ...
(asandh) - F
Re: Re: Re: Re: New Shoe Quiver... on 01/05/2014 17:19:20 MST Print View

I tried the Cascadia 9's on in the store last week.
I don't have the specs yet but the stack height feels similar to the 7's.
what I do like is a change in the front that seems to make you role onto the toe much easier. These could be the most runnable Cascadias yet.

I would not waste money on the 8's,go straight to the 9's.

Ozzy McKinney
(PorcupinePhobia) - F

Locale: PNW
cascadias on 01/05/2014 17:53:53 MST Print View

Craig, what size do you wear? I have a pair of size 14 cascadia 8s with plenty of life left you can have.

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: training on 01/07/2014 21:59:00 MST Print View

The last two weeks have been a mixed bag for me. Last week was a bit of a recovery week with few miles run. Got in a solid 23 mile adventure run the week before last up in the Sacramento Mtns. and Dog Canyon, my first run back here in years, with a healthy 4800' of vertical up to the turnaround. We ran the first 3K' up to the top of the rim, but hit snow from that point all the way up to the Sunspot Solar Observatory which sits at 9200'. Weather conditions were absolutely perfect, but the crusty pow took it out of us on the climb. Running down was fun and we picked up the pace where we could coming back down. I love these runs far more than any obligatory training run and feel I gain much from these experiences.

Saturday's long run was pretty ho hum, but I still got after it and felt strong for the duration.

Here are a few photographs from our Sacramento Mtns./Dog Canyon run:

14

9

10

11

12

15


*Ran this in the Inov8 Trailroc 245. I had only done a few runs in the 245's prior to this one. I really like them for technical trail, but don't see myself running anything over a 50K distance without taking an unnecessary beating on my feet. Love the outsole more than any other feature of the shoe, second would be the low weight of the shoe. They feel damn fast. For dry craggy trail like we have here in the high desert, they're just about perfect for shorter hard effort runs. I also ordered the Trailroc 255 (* are you seeing the trend here? I went a little crazy on kicks the last few weeks) thinking they would have the same feel as the 245 but with some added cushion for training miles. These will work out for longer runs on technical trail, they just don't feel, to me, up for the task of higher volume training miles even with the added midsole cushion and durable upper. For running road to trail stretches, both shoes are bearable, but not for long. I haven't found anything out there this past year as good as the Pearl Izumi Trail N1 and N2 for general running, whether that be road or trail miles.

Edited by Eugeneius on 01/07/2014 22:15:31 MST.

Art ...
(asandh) - F
Re: Re: training on 01/08/2014 08:14:21 MST Print View

How far do you live from those trails Eugene ?
nice looking area.

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: Re: Re: training on 01/08/2014 08:47:04 MST Print View

Art, this area is about 1-1.5 hr east of my town. It's borderlining that distance from home where I start feeling a little guilty about driving to a trailhead for a run. These runs aren't a weekly thing. Most of the trails I run regularly are about 10 min from my door by vehicle.

How about you guys?

I get the impression Mike M. just hops out his front door to the trailhead up there in MT. Craig and Adan seem to be fairly close to the San Gabriels, but "close" by LA standards probably means some form of vehicular commute and traffic.

Do you guys ever hit the road out your door for miles?

Art ...
(asandh) - F
Re: Re: Re: Re: training on 01/08/2014 09:07:21 MST Print View

local training ...

I live in a very suburban setting, but right next to one of the largest urban open space parks in the country (Mission Trails Park). So lots of trails 5 minutes from my house for short to medium distance runs, and there are even 3-4 hills with up to 1,000 ft of gain. However the biggest one has gotten quite popular as an outdoor gym, I'll have to post a photo of the "conga line" sometime.

For long runs, the local mountains are 45-60 minutes away (6,000 ft elevation), with 40 miles of PCT running thru them. This is where our local ultra races are, SD 100 plus 4 others a bit shorter.

I have to run a minimum of 1 mile on concrete before I hit dirt.
I do sometimes run 4-10 mile road runs with rolling elevation gain/loss to try and increase my leg turnover. Lots of 20+ trail runs with power walking can really slow the legs down.

Edited by asandh on 01/08/2014 09:13:06 MST.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: training on 01/08/2014 09:30:47 MST Print View

Most of my staple runs are out the door to the trail, no car needed. My house is less than one mile from a few different entrances to the Angeles National Forest/San Gabriels. If I don't run, I usually ride my bike to the trailhead. Many of the bigger peaks require driving to the trailhead, but I can do plenty without driving if I want to.

Adan Lopez
(Lopez) - F

Locale: San Gabriel Valley
Run commute on 01/08/2014 10:25:30 MST Print View

During the week, I use 5 trails within 10 minutes drive. A steep hill climb, a fun night-running rollercoaster, a woodsy creek, and a long runnable grind overlooking the city lights. Not spectacular stuff, but enjoyable enough that i look forward to them.

However, on the weekends? Hell no, I'm driving. Exploring new mountains is what fuels my passion for running so I feel it's mandatory. Besides, I drive an hour daily to work, and to me this is just as good a reason to pony up the gas money. I feel 2-3 hours of driving is not too much to ask for something that gives me so much in return and costs nothing otherwise.

Recent firsts for me:
Baldy night-climb. Friday after work, snowy and no headlamp. 1hr driving.
Baden-Powell with Craig. 6hrs fresh powder and ridge walking. 4hrs driving.
San Gorgonio Wilderness, a new favorite camp discovered. 3hrs driving.
Off-trail traverse of Baldy group, discovered some fantastic lines. 1hr drive.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
trailheads on 01/08/2014 17:34:21 MST Print View

Eugene- you're spot on, most of the trails I run are out my backdoor- not sure how many miles of different trail, but it's pretty substantial and if I want to make it long I link several trails together.

One of the reasons I moved from Southeast MT to Westcentral MT

I have a 50k Fatass this weekend, I feel underprepared, but the what the hell :) I do think I'm going to incorporate a run/walk regime ala Galloway; I think I'm going to try a 7.5 min run/2.5 min walk and see how that goes.

Mike