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Ryan Heck
(heckdog) - F - M
Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/05/2013 23:17:57 MDT Print View

Not the lightest system but I do like pressed coffee. Good to see someone improving a classic and making it available again.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/briansiebert/press-bot-a-high-quality-french-press-in-a-nalgene?ref=recently_launched

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/06/2013 09:29:29 MDT Print View

I see that you and the person making this are both from Flagstaff,do you know him?

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: Press Bot on 10/06/2013 09:58:22 MDT Print View

He's got his funding.


Now we wait for a non biased review...

Edited by kthompson on 10/06/2013 09:59:03 MDT.

Ryan Heck
(heckdog) - F - M
Non-biased Review on 10/06/2013 10:18:43 MDT Print View

Yes, Brian is has been a GC guide here is flagstaff and is an all around great dude.

It's from 2006 but here is a review of the old system

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/Press-Bot-Coffee-Filter.html

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/06/2013 10:23:18 MDT Print View

Definitely not the lightest solution for coffee, but other than Cowboy coffee and Via packets, most backcountry coffee solutions that yield more than a decent cup or two aren't light by BPL standards.

I'd pack a Press Bot in on a winter hike or fat laden weekend trip, especially if I was sharing miles and smiles with a few others. I think its a slick product that clearly works and doesn't take up any room, assuming you already have a Nalgene with you.

What is the target audience for this press?

I'm not familiar with raft guiding gear and packing styles, but I get the impression weight matters very little in that camp and slipping in a real deal Bialetti or traditional group sized press system isn't a big deal. Would they use something like this? Traditional weight backpackers seem to pack separate items for specific purposes, shying away from niche multi-use items like the Press Bot. Is this sorta lost on them?

Generally, lightweight hikers of the BPL variety, IME, forgo coffee altogether, or settle for instant solutions that 'get the job done', sacrificing some quality for efficiency (*weight). Of course coffee tastes run the gamut and what defines a "quality" cup of brew is up for debate.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
BPing vs. Rafting on 10/06/2013 16:58:59 MDT Print View

Eugene,

When I've rafted, including GCNP, it was striking how the boat still floats, regardless of how much it is loaded. So 3-burner grills, a lawn chair for each person and 4 beers per person per day are the norm. It is a totally different world when you haul in heads of lettuce and haul out your own poop.

Ross Bleakney
(rossbleakney) - MLife

Locale: Cascades
Re: Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/06/2013 19:19:37 MDT Print View

I'm not a coffee drinker, but 2.4 ounces sounds good to me. In other words, if I was a coffee drinker, and this was capable of making better coffee, than an extra couple ounces seems like a pretty small price to pay (of course, you have to factor in the difference between a Nalgene and a different water bottle).

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: BPing vs. Rafting on 10/06/2013 19:22:51 MDT Print View

"It is a totally different world when you haul in heads of lettuce and haul out your own poop."

David, are these two items closely related?

--B.G.--

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Re: Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/06/2013 20:02:19 MDT Print View

Probably doesn't require too much deep thinking to figure 1 litre/32oz or 4 large 8oz cups of brewed coffee requires ~2oz+ of dry coffee to prepare. The dirty, wet spent grounds will weigh ~6oz.+ to pack out. Plus you need lots extra water to wash out the Nalgene bottle and some kind of filter to separate the grounds from the wash water.

The equivalent 4 packs of Starbucks VIA weighs ~16g or 0.6oz. IMO, VIA is a no-brainer for backpacking no matter how much a coffee aficionado you are in daily life. Almost no cleanup or waste afterwards too.

No matter as apparently the old "pour over" method seems to be back in vogue now as the brew of choice. I predict the self-styled coffee aficionados will soon come full circle back to the percolators of our parents!

Ross Bleakney
(rossbleakney) - MLife

Locale: Cascades
Re: Re: Re: Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/06/2013 20:54:58 MDT Print View

OK, Rick. Good point. In a "blue bag" zone (that is, an area where you have to carry out everything, including your feces) this type of coffee probably doesn't make sense. But most folks spend very little time in that zone. They routinely dig a hole or find an outhouse. The spent coffee grounds can go in there.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/06/2013 21:12:31 MDT Print View

> Generally, lightweight hikers of the BPL variety, IME, forgo coffee altogether, or
> settle for instant solutions that 'get the job done', sacrificing some quality for
> efficiency

You have GOT to be kidding!!!!
The words 'instant' and 'coffee' should never be combined in one sentence !!!

Cheers

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/06/2013 22:32:31 MDT Print View

Ross, a French press is just another kind of filter. It's main benefit is it lets all the coffee oils pass, unlike a paper or cloth filter that absorbs them. Its the mouth feel of these oils and the stronger steep that most folks like. Unfortunately, the press also lets un-dissolved coffee dust pass too so you end up with some fine sludge in your cup. Some folks are OK with this but would bet most folks prefer "clearer" cups.

It is possible to get the same flavor using the far simpler $10 GSI H2JO! (48g/1.7oz) and widemouth Nalgene/Thermos bottle. It's mesh screen is kinda coarse though and will let even more sludge pass than a typical press.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/06/2013 22:41:09 MDT Print View

"It is possible to get the same flavor using the far simpler $10 GSI H2JO! (48g/1.7oz) and widemouth Nalgene/Thermos bottle"

+1

Makes a decent pre-filter for the clear water we have here also.

Phillip Asby
(PGAsby) - M

Locale: North Carolina
Still uncertain on 10/07/2013 14:33:01 MDT Print View

I have not solved the coffee equation fully for myself. I have an REI press mug that is fine for car camping but heavy as all getout for a backpacking trip. Although it does have a heavy steel handle that could perhaps be removed (think it might even screw on...) to lighten it up a bit. It works great however.

I've tried Via and Nescafe packs and Via is about as decent as I've experienced given how little it weighs.

Still - I'd carry a little more weight for a decent cup of coffee. I think I read in another thread that the Jetboil press fits the Snow Peak 700ml mug - if that is true it might encourage me to buy one of those SPs!

The regular SP press looks nice but is a steep price for what it is - although I suppose the ti pot could work for heating water on a stove as well as another pot - it is a bit slim...

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Still uncertain on 10/07/2013 15:10:48 MDT Print View

IMO, a French press is not practical for brewing small individual servings and using one in a 1L Nalgene will lead to a pretty nasty/rancid bottle after a week or so on the trail.

If you can deal with the cleanup and waste disposal, the Montbell OD Compact dripper is about the lightest/easiest/best tasting solution. Still will need to wash the filter after every use and store it wet in a ziplock I think.

MB Compact Dripper

Larry De La Briandais
(Hitech) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
GSI Java on 10/07/2013 16:11:32 MDT Print View

If you don't want to use VIA (it's okay, but requires two packets for a small cup) this is really light and works very well:

http://www.campmor.com/gsi-outdoors-ultralight-java-drip-coffee-maker.shtml?source=CI&ci_sku=17467ORA&ci_gpa=pla&ci_kw=

I still use paper filters, but let everything dry out before packing up. Cleanup is much easier that way.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - F

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Maybe Coffee Cubes? on 10/07/2013 16:25:39 MDT Print View

Sarah's blog just reviewed a new product -- Javi Coffee Cubes. I haven't tried them, but they looked intriguing...and actually less expensive than Starbucks Via.

Art Tyszka
(arttyszka) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Montbell on 10/07/2013 16:36:36 MDT Print View

+1 on the Montbell filter. I tried it on a whim and used it the last 2 weekends, it produced a decent cup, better than Via for sure, through a lot heavier packing in the ground coffee.

I struggle to see why some pack out spent coffee grounds, they're a great composting item, so what's the problem of leaving them in the backcountry next to the raccoon and coyote scat? Earthworms sure do like them.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Maybe Coffee Cubes? on 10/07/2013 16:38:17 MDT Print View

" Javi Coffee Cubes. I haven't tried them, but they looked intriguing...and actually less expensive than Starbucks Via."

Unfortunately, Jiva coffee cubes all come pre-sweetened. A non starter for many, I suspect

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Classic Backcountry Coffee System Revived! on 10/07/2013 16:42:04 MDT Print View

"You have GOT to be kidding!!!!
The words 'instant' and 'coffee' should never be combined in one sentence !!!"

Bear in mind this is America, where gratification in all its permutations is...instant. An entire economy has developed to support it. ;0)