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Desperately need vegan or vegetarian Lunch ideas
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Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re on 10/07/2013 15:36:56 MDT Print View

Heath, your condition must be something completely different from the ordinary stomach problems that lots of us deal with.

--B.G.--

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/07/2013 15:48:56 MDT Print View

Bob,
It is. It causes me much distress but I try and not let it affect what I like to do. It's pretty crazy and definitely not something I thought I'd ever have to deal with and more so that I'm only 33.

Lisa Frugoli
(alfresco) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Desperately need vegan or vegetarian lunch ideas on 10/07/2013 20:56:48 MDT Print View

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/tofu-jerky-ii/

I've been making this tofu jerky recipe for a couple of months now. It's great & so much cheaper than the store-bought versions. I use my dehydrator. Costco has organic tofu blocks. Seems to be very shelf-stable but haven't had much around for long! Tested it out on meat eaters & vegetarians & all love it.

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re Tofu jerky on 10/07/2013 21:05:39 MDT Print View

That's great. I'd never even heard of that before. Do you have any other ideas like that?

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re Tofu jerky on 10/07/2013 21:46:23 MDT Print View

How about hummus and baba ganoush (eggplant spread)? Is tahini sauce too fatty?
I find that both make a great vegan spread.

I also didn't see anything about beans mentioned here, maybe I missed it.
Any mashed/refried style bean rehydrates well without heat and makes a good spread- burritos or the like. Same goes for mashed potatoes; calorie dense, fast hydrating, easy to make burritos. Vegan "sausage" or "meat" patties crumbled into mashed potatoes and eaten as a burrito might fit the bill...but the patties would require heating.

I would also look into tempeh. I don;t know how well it dehydrates, but it can be found in individually wrapped packages that carry well. Sliced and added to veggies or a spread, it makes for good pita bread wraps or similar.

I'd recommend looking at Brendan Brazier. He writes exclusively on vegan nutrition for endurance athletes and has plenty of recipes that might work for you. PM your address and I'll send you one of his books.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Re Tofu jerky on 10/07/2013 22:15:54 MDT Print View

One of the foods i sometimes bring with me, is a marinated (with a mix of soy sauce, dark beer, some herbs, and wee bit of apple cider vinegar) Tempeh, which i then dehydrate, and then cook (to kill the mold).

It becomes vaguely like a jerky.

But, as previously mentioned Tempeh may not work well for the OP, since it is actually quite high in fat, and because it is so protein dense, rather acid forming in nature.

Lisa Frugoli
(alfresco) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Desperately need vegan or vegetarian lunch ideas on 10/08/2013 06:36:23 MDT Print View

http://www.thewickedgoodvegan.com/2012/10/31/vegan-jerky/

http://vspot16.wordpress.com/2012/04/19/tofu-jerky-using-a-dehydrator/

Here are 2 more that I thought looked interesting. You can buy or make dehydrated hummus & mix with water at lunch.

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/08/2013 10:14:29 MDT Print View

I eat a ton of hummus and baba ganoush, got hooked on it in the middle east and neither of them hurts my stomach and they have a good amount of protein. Would any of those veggie patties be ok without refrigeration? They make some pretty good tasting ones nowadays. Beans work well too, I would have to rehydrate them though and that means cooking at mid day which I am trying to avoid, unless I rehydrated the beans in the morning and ate them later.

Where can one find dehydrated hummus? I brought along some tiny squeeze packs of hummus that I bought online and they tasted nasty. I know I need to invest in a dehydrator but it'll have to wait a few months.

Thanks for all the help folks I really appreciate it. Please keep the ideas coming.

Peter Treiber
(peterbt) - M

Locale: A^2
"Desperately need vegan or vegetarian Lunch ideas" on 10/08/2013 10:53:30 MDT Print View

My first thought was those Dr. Mcdougall soup cups at the supermarket -- his whole thing is a low-fat vegan diet for reversing heart disease -- but that would involve boiling water.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: hummous on 10/08/2013 11:15:16 MDT Print View

"Where can one find dehydrated hummus?"

Lots of ordinary grocery stores sell it in the same aisle as rice and couscous. One brand is Casbah.

--B.G.--

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Desperately need vegan or vegetarian Lunch ideas on 10/08/2013 11:18:43 MDT Print View

Don't know where you can get dehydrated hummus or baba ganoush but my wife is Armenian so I could send you some good recipes when you get a dehydrator.

As for the veggie patties keeping, I've gone up to 5 days with Morning Star "breakfast sausage" patties and about the same on vegan grillers. I think 5 might be pushing it a bit, but I'd feel very safe for 3.

Sharon J.
(squark) - F

Locale: SF Bay area
dehydrated hummus on 10/08/2013 13:28:41 MDT Print View

also check the bulk food section

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/08/2013 13:45:55 MDT Print View

I'm getting hooked up with a dehydrator from someone in the forums! So I'd love the recipes. I'll have to check at the store. We don't usually buy pre made foods so I am never in those aisles of the grocery store.

BER ---
(BER) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Hummus on 10/08/2013 15:16:04 MDT Print View

Hummus is super easy to make. Basically just chick peas, garlic, and tahini as a base. Throw it in a food processor and grind until smooth. If eating at home then you add olive oil, but if dehydrating, don't add this (dehydrates better without) and bring some on the trail for when you mix it up. To the base you can add a variety of things to your taste: roasted red peppers, chili peppers, cilantro, green onion, lemon or lime, salt, pepper.

One recipe from Laurie Ann March's A Fork in the Trail book that we particularly like:
1x 19 oz can of chickpeas, rinsed
1/4c orange juice
1/2t lime juice
2 cloves garlic
1 heaping T orange zest
2T tahini
pinch of salt
1/4t ground black pepper

We tend to add a bit more orange and lime to brighten it up and add some olive oil in camp to add silky smoothness, but we tend not to follow recipes too closely in general...

If the citrus in this one will cause you stomach issues, then using 1/3-1/2c roasted red peppers to the base is an alternative that is also in Laurie's book. You don't have to add the olive oil if that will give you problems or if you don't want to carry the weight. It good without as well.

I recommend her book. I think there are quite a few recipes there that could be used or modified to your particular dietary needs. Its definitely worth checking out

Edited by BER on 10/08/2013 15:21:19 MDT.

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re Hummus on 10/08/2013 15:37:39 MDT Print View

Thanks for the recipe. We make Hummus all the time. As I said previously we don't eat pre made foods and we try and make everything from scratch with the exception of breads and pastas if we can; whether it be Middle Eastern, Indian, or any number of other Asian foods. I will check out that book. I haven't used a dehydrator since I was a kid so it will be an interesting experiment. I do like the option of a pre made dehydrated hummus or other foods as its already packaged and ready to go. I have a very demanding job(50+hrs a week) and sometimes I don't have the time to make time intensive foods and then dehydrate them.


That book title sounded familiar to me I added to my Amazon wishlist a few months back. I will have to pick it up.

Edited by antitrust311 on 10/08/2013 15:39:17 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re Hummus on 10/08/2013 15:51:27 MDT Print View

"We make Hummus all the time."

Normally, you just serve it in a plate or bowl, and you dig in with pita bread or chips. However, it is kind of bland-looking, isn't it?

As I serve it, I decorate it with one circle of green dried dill and a concentric circle of red paprika. Visually, it makes it more interesting, and those flavors work with the blandness of the beans.

--B.G.--

BER ---
(BER) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
vegetarian lunches on 10/08/2013 15:56:38 MDT Print View

There is a black bean salsa dip in Laurie's book that is also very good (and easy) that might work for you if the acidity in salsa isnt't too much for your belly.

These Quinoa Black Bean Burgers are very good. They are fairly crumbly to begin with, so after cooking you would be able to crumble and dehydrate pretty easily. Rehydrate the crumble and eat on a pita... Haven't tried this, but it seems feasible. Maybe bake instead of frying to decrease the oil. If you are anti-egg, it could be left out of the recipe as you'd be crumbling the burger for dehydrating.

http://www.preventionrd.com/2012/12/black-bean-quinoa-veggie-burgers/

Pinterest is your friend.

Edited by BER on 10/08/2013 16:09:44 MDT.

Gary Dunckel
(Zia-Grill-Guy) - MLife

Locale: Boulder
Re Hummus on 10/08/2013 17:03:11 MDT Print View

And then you could slice and dehydrate some stuffed Spanish olives (they rehydrate very quickly) and add that to the bland hummus, sprinkle BG's concentric circle stuff, and you'll be the most sought-after lunch prep cook in the forest.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re Hummus on 10/08/2013 19:18:47 MDT Print View

"sprinkle BG's concentric circle stuff"

It was all part of a scheme to reduce gear weight. Where have we heard of that?

Back in the old days, I would be leading some 8-12-person group trip in Yosemite. First of all, if you try to do a one-pot meal for that many mouths, you end up with an extremely large cook pot which is hard to pack. I found that if I broke up a group meal into several small no-heat courses, I could get it done with smaller pots and less hassle. So, I went with appetizers of hummus with celery sticks and carrot sticks and olives. Then a cooked main course, or sometimes one vegetarian main course and one carnivore main course. Then a fruit dessert. Since pots can get reused within one meal, it all saved weight.

Hummus is a good source of protein, and if backpackers are hungry enough, they will eat a lot of it. The red and green garnish just made sure, but it weighs almost zero.

--B.G.--

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Re: Re Hummus on 10/09/2013 10:18:53 MDT Print View

You don't need a dehydrator to make dried hummus.

Make whatever hummus you like, but leave out the oil. SPread on parchment lined baking sheets, dry in your oven on the lowest setting till dry. Powder. Store.

Easy peasy.....

Btw, I'll have a new recipe going live tomorrow on my blog for a paleo/vegan/allergy friendly "cookie" that is made with pumpkin/banana/coconut flour/dates, etc. No nuts, no added oils. No seeds. I did these for my youngest. I'll post a link tomorrow :-)