Forum Index » Food, Hydration, and Nutrition » Desperately need vegan or vegetarian Lunch ideas


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Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - F

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Quinoa salad for lunch? on 10/06/2013 10:59:27 MDT Print View

Heath,
Wow - this is a tough one, because most prepared foods rely on fats and acids (and sugar) for calories/flavor...

How about making a little quinoa salad for lunch, using either instant quinoa, or regular quinoa that you pre-cook and dehydrate at home? At breakfast, combine some quinoa, some herbs/spices, and some dehydrated veggies and/or fruits in a little ziplock screw-top container. Just before lunchtime, add water, and let the whole thing rehydrate. Protein and vitamins!

Also, consider making your own turkey or chicken jerky. If you pre-freeze the meat and slice it as thin as you can, it will melt in your mouth! You can also make custom flavors like bourbon maple cayenne, or jalapeno teriyaki, or whatever your imagination leads you to...

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/06/2013 11:26:49 MDT Print View

Yeah its a tough one and thats why I am reaching out to all the experienced folks here. Quinoa sounds great I usually eat a mixture of quinoa, oats, and flax seed for breakfast. I am making some nut free larabars using seeds, logan bread and a few other things that will hopefully work. I really need to buy a dehydrator to make my own meals/jerky.

I wish there was an oil that I could eat, but alas I can not. If it's say pasta tossed very lightly in olive oil or a small pad of butter I am fine but anything that has more than an ounce or two wreaks havoc on my stomach and gi tract and causes me to be in severe pain.

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re: Logan bread on 10/06/2013 17:56:10 MDT Print View

Bob, I made your Logan bread recipe and it's in the oven, I am also making a brick bar recipe from Ken Larson that I found on here. both look great. I am going to try and make a chia seed/medjool date bar later. I read that Chia is a complete protein so I am hoping it will work well.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Re: Logan bread on 10/06/2013 18:07:47 MDT Print View

Have a look at wheatberries as well. Decent protein source, good nutrition profile. I make veggie chili with them, very tasty.

Can you eat avocados? If so, could be a source of good fat.

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re: Avocados/Wheatberries on 10/06/2013 18:26:00 MDT Print View

I can eat a small amount of avocado, again a few ounces then if I eat more than that I am in pain. Wheat berries are great my wife makes all kinds of meals with them.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Avocados/Wheatberries on 10/06/2013 19:33:11 MDT Print View

"I can eat a small amount of avocado"

That has mostly monounsaturated fat, which is healthy. You might want to explore similar foods with monounsaturated fat to find more stuff that you can tolerate in small amounts.

I just wished that there was some way to dehydrate avocado successfully and retain flavor.

I used to have a lot of stomach pain also, but it was a normal heartburn thing caused by too much stomach acid and acidic food, and it is easily treated with the generic form of Prilosec. Fortunately, when I get out on the backpacking trail, the condition eases up even more.

--B.G.--

Backpack Jack
(jumpbackjack) - F - M

Locale: Armpit of California
Oils on 10/07/2013 00:05:48 MDT Print View

Have you tried coconut oil? That seems to work for some people that can't tolerate other oils.

Jack

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/07/2013 08:10:35 MDT Print View

I was in the Navy for 10 years and traveled to over 25 countries in the Middle East and Asia, living in Japan for 5 years. My wife and I learned to love the cuisine and mostly make Southeast Asian dishes and or very healthy vegetarian dishes at home until this stomach problem hit. We cook with everything under the sun, especially with a lot of things one can't find in your average American grocery store. Once I developed this problem most of those foods are now off limits including coconut oil. It's very frustrating but luckily it hasn't inhibited my ability to run/hike/bike/surf/snowboard but it makes all the amazing and spicy Asian dishes we once loved out of reach and with trying to spend more time in the backcountry I am coming up dangerously short on calories and especially on protein.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - F

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Maybe Backcountry Smoothies? on 10/07/2013 09:56:08 MDT Print View

Heath,
Maybe you could make some sort of backcountry smoothie as part of your lunch, adding only those ingredients you can tolerate, but definitely including protein powder.

Among the ingredients you might include:
Powdered yogurt
Powdered skim milk (usually backpackers use Nido, but that would be too fatty)
Powdered almond or soy milk
Protein powder (there are a dizzying array of different types; one will surely be
ok for you, but it might take some experimenting)
Spirulina (maybe)
Less acidic fruit, freeze-dried and pulverized

And anything else you like (powdered vanilla, chocolate powder, matcha powder, etc.)

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Re: Re on 10/07/2013 10:38:37 MDT Print View

If you have stomach/digestive issues, most forms of soy are probably not a very good idea, as these are quite hard to digest fully and completely, even for people with healthier digestion.

Fermented or cultured organic soy, is much better. Things like organic forms of Soy yogurt, Miso, Natto, and even Tempeh (unless you have mold issues) are some forms. Actually, Tempeh has a lot of fat in it, so might cause issues for you.

I'm guessing dried, non sulphured fruit, certain grains, low fat dried goat milk (not sure they make this though) might be some foods to try.

Btw, not all fats are created equal. Some are much harder to break down and digest than others. Coconut oil for example, is one of the easiest to digest fats, and the body breaks it down almost as efficiently as a carb. Granted, with your issues you don't want to eat any amounts of same, but maybe try a very little at a time and see if you get the same reactions. If not, adding a little is a good way to boost calories.

If you don't like the taste of turkey jerky, what about good smoked salmon (like the Costco Wild Alaskan stuff)? Wouldn't be good for any longer periods of time, but a couple of days should last well enough.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re on 10/07/2013 10:59:41 MDT Print View

Wheat is also another one that commonly causes issues for people with compromised digestive systems.

I have some thoughts on why gluten intolerance/sensitivity and celiac seems to be increasing quite a lot in modern times.

It may be a confluence of different factors such as: Modern forms of wheat are much higher in gluten than more ancient and less hybridized forms.

Up until the the earlier 1900's, most bread was sour dough made. Sour doughing bread and wheat, is somewhat akin to turning cow milk into yogurt or the like. With sour dough cultures, you have a wide mix of bacteria, yeast and sometimes other microbes that help to break down and predigest the wheat, ultimately, making it easier for you to digest. Similar to cow milk and yogurt. Now, most wheat breads are made with a single strain of yeast. This has become the most commonly consumed forms of bread in many countries.

Modern forms of super yeast are more specialized and do not pre digest the various substances in wheat like a sour dough culture does. The yeast concentrates on the starchy/sugary part for it's food source and not so much the proteins (which gluten is).

The increasingly popular and exported "western" type diet has become rather unhealthy in many respects, which in itself compromises people's digestive systems.

Add those 3 factors together, and it makes a lot of sense why gluten intolerance/sensitivity and celiac disease is on the rise. People's bodies are quite frankly rejecting that which it can not fully and properly digest. The exception to this, is course cellulose/fiber, which we've been eating since we've been around and which provides a very necessary cleansing function for us which is why our bodies don't reject it like partially undigested proteins. Proteins also resemble more the various pathogens that cause problems for us.

Anyways, speaking as someone with a compromised digestive system, i feel better when i avoid wheat and gluten. My body seems less sensitive though, to things like well sour doughed spelt bread for an example. However, for a true celiac it will still cause problems because any trace of unbroken down gluten elicits severe reactions. A more true "allergy" has built up in such a case.

Note: i'm not medically trained, but have been researching, studying, and experimenting with diet and holistic health since age 16 out of necessity due to some unusual and at one time, very uncomfortable body imbalances.

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/07/2013 12:37:51 MDT Print View

Vegan protein powder smoothies are a great option for hiking as I can buy them in individual packets. It is kind of messy but I guess I will have to deal with it.

I am a total food nerd and I have read a lot on the science behind a lot of foods and the history of food so I know a lot of this already and like I said we eat really healthy at home but it is hard to translate those foods into hiking as bringing a bunch of fruits, vegetables, grains and other fresh foods does not work. As I am looking at taking longer trips in the 4-5 day range and maybe even the 14-30 day range I do not have the desire to carry the weight. I ran into some folks in Glacier NP that brought nothing but fresh foods and it was probably 75% of their pack. I ran into another group of College age folks that caught fresh fish, foraged for wild edibles and mushrooms and their dinner looked fantastic as well. I live and hike mostly in Arizona with 3-4 trips elsewhere in the nation during the year so there aren't a lot of wild edibles in this state except in certain locations and for brief periods of the year so that isn't an option either.

Wheat may be a part of the problem. I have read a lot of this info as well. We try and eat ancient grains a lot as they are a lot better for you and tend to have more protein and what not. We don't eat processed foods and try and steer clear of anything that has more than 5 ingredients in it. Lots of fresh fruits, veggies, breads and honeys from farmers markets for sure.

I am making some Larabars in the next few days before my hike this weekend that call for coconut oil in them and will see how it goes.

I can't stomach Natto. Its a favorite food in Japan but it is incredibly foul stuff.

Edited by antitrust311 on 10/08/2013 10:18:23 MDT.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - F

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Yup, Dehydrator in your (Near) Future on 10/07/2013 13:10:55 MDT Print View

LOL, Heath -- about the only foods you can forage here in AZ on a regular basis are jojoba nuts, and they're probably too fatty for you! (OK, berries at high elevations in July/Aug.)

I think a dehydrator would really help you. You can make food at home, dehydrate it, and bring it along. I think you'll also benefit from the "rehydrate while hiking" technique, where you soak food in advance (most people use a Ziploc twist-top plastic jar) in your pack while hiking. The good news about S.AZ is that it's so hot here much of the time, you're also heating it as you walk!

Since you have easy access to Hispanic foods, of course you can make homemade bean burritos to take with you...add just a half ounce of cheese for flavor (not enough to upset the system), some dehydrated pre-grilled veggies. Not too bad!

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/07/2013 13:49:10 MDT Print View

I grew up in the White Mountains of Easter Arizona and we found lots of wild grapes, berries, celery (of all things), Pine nuts, and a lot of edible flowers, there are tubers and cactus that are edible in the desert but yeah unless you are in the mountains here its slim picking for sure and even whats available as I said is few and far between and only available for a very short time of the year.


I will most likely pick up a dehydrator in the next few months and start experimenting with that. Beans as long as they aren't swimming in oil seem to treat me ok.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: flax and chia on 10/07/2013 13:55:38 MDT Print View

Be wary of flax and chia if you have gut issues, work up on them. They DO contain oils but also can irritate the stomach. Otherwise they are great. For me, I can handle ground flaxseed, but not chia - whole or ground. CHia kills my gut painfully.

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/07/2013 14:07:56 MDT Print View

I already eat Chia seeds, I combine them with coconut and dried dates, I add a bit of cold water and let the Chia seeds hydrate and its a really good breakfast. I have eaten a bit of Flax I always test everything out at home to see what works or doesn't work so I don't end up in a life threatening situation in the backcountry.

John Hillyer
(TrNameLucky) - MLife
Ideas on 10/07/2013 14:57:24 MDT Print View

You could see how your stomach handles Premier Protein bars. They are sold at Wal-Mart for $1.18.

http://www.premierprotein.com/product/double-chocolate-crunch-bar/

Unless your Doctors have come up with a specific diagnosis and effective treatment plan, have you tried Omeprazole? It's generic over the counter Prilosec and fixes most GERD, stomach irritation, and some ulcer type problems if taken daily.

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/07/2013 15:15:06 MDT Print View

They've got it narrowed down just waiting on some lab work to come back. No over the counter medicines work at all. I'm on a prescription medicine that has improved things but I still have to be on a very restricted diet. Oh and as I said before I can't eat chocolate it's too acidic.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Ideas on 10/07/2013 15:16:01 MDT Print View

"Prilosec"

There seems to be an echo around here.

--B.G.--

Heath Poulter
(antitrust311) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re on 10/07/2013 15:26:13 MDT Print View

Bob, that stuff did absolutely nothing for me.