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just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Hatchet or Machete? on 10/15/2013 00:44:39 MDT Print View

Hi David G.

Purely defensively, weaponry wise, i would go with the machete. In a more serious, long term collapse scenario, there are going to be A LOT of gone feral, starving dogs around, and personally i would rather much more face larger animals with a longer bladed weapon than a wee hatchet.

The Cold Steel "Katana" machete is less a machete (but can be used that way), but decent quality (but inexpensive) blade weapon. Plus, i can throw it like a spear pretty well. The tanto point is really strong and penetrating.

But yeah, a hatchet will be better making stuff and more all purpose.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Lazy Prepper on 10/15/2013 00:53:08 MDT Print View

There are different options Ian. Personally, i'm going with a lot of goat milk powder, pretty nutritionally dense, easy to digest, and fairly light weight and easily kept long term.

You can also go with dried whey, but it will have less calories/fat than the goat milk powder.

I don't recommend cow milk powder because of how hard to digest it is. When a food is hard to digest, it takes more energy than is helpful from your body to try to break it down.

Whey on the other hand, is all the good stuff in cow milk, without any or very little of, the bad stuff like the gluey casein proteins or lactose. Some wheys have more lactose than others, but for someone who can't drink cows milk without getting noticeably mucous'y, i can drink goat's milk without a problem. Yet, they both have lactose--the difference is that the goat milk proteins are much smaller and more easily broke down than the cow casein proteins.

It's the casein proteins that make the "curds" in that old nursery rhyme about little miss muffet, all the rest is the nice, nutritious and easily digested whey.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Re: Lazy Prepper on 10/15/2013 00:59:23 MDT Print View

David A., shelf stable margarine could work, but though it's more expensive, i would recommend extra virgin coconut oil. Costco sells a large tub of it for quite reasonable compared to most other places.

Very stable, high quality fat and definitely healthier than most margarines, which tend to add a lot of soy oil and other lesser quality oils. Besides being super stable, EVCO is easier to digest than most other fats.

Edited by ArcturusBear on 10/15/2013 08:23:58 MDT.

David Adair
(DavidAdair) - M

Locale: West Dakota
Re: Re: Lazy Prepper on 10/15/2013 01:28:10 MDT Print View

I really am a lazy prepper and don't know much about nutrition. Part of being lazy means I don't want to fuss with rotating stock. I just want cheap food with a long shelf life because I have every intention of ignoring it until I pitch it out unused in 10 or 20 years.

There are canned meats available, spam, tuna, chicken and beef. I don't know long they are good for, I would guess 5 years or more. You can find canned corned beef that is relatively expensive but lasts much longer. Of course there is freeze dried meat which is also expensive but is claimed to be good for 25 years. If you do buy freeze dried stuff wait to find it on sale somewhere.

I suppose you could live on something like Ensure so something like that might make a great supplement.

I can see how this prepping thing could become another time consuming and expensive hobby. I don't need another hobby...just want to bridge the gap until food is back in the grocery store and cold milk is in the fridge.

ETA: I'll check out the coconut oil and goats milk/whey,thanks!

Edited by DavidAdair on 10/15/2013 02:37:17 MDT.

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Black Swan event sooner than you think on 10/15/2013 03:08:06 MDT Print View

Well it seems the most powerful typhoon in 10yrs is on a bullseye path for the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant tonight. Will this be the Black Swan event no one planned for? USA West Coast will have ~4days to get underground!

http://tinyurl.com/ksg2yj2

http://tinyurl.com/mefp5jk

http://tinyurl.com/cu7nz76

Edited by rmjapan on 10/15/2013 03:18:20 MDT.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Black Swan event sooner than you think on 10/16/2013 20:57:42 MDT Print View

Thankfully it wasn't as bad as it could have been.

Ian Van Halen
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Re: Lazy Prepper on 10/17/2013 00:01:16 MDT Print View

" i would recommend extra virgin coconut oil. Costco sells a large tub of it for quite reasonable compared to most other places.

I checked this product out at Costco the other day. I love that there was over 20,000 calories in the tub but it only had a two year shelf life. Looks like a good product to keep on hand for every day use but not for long term storage.

Anywho.... I spent about $60 at Costco which purchased enough calories to feed my family of four for 17 days. The diet would be dreadfully boring but I'll add more to it in due time.

This is a great video created by the LDS and I found it to be very informative for food storage:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOLuIApyNPc

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Lazy Prepper on 10/17/2013 07:47:17 MDT Print View

If stored properly, it will last longer than two years. Its one of the most stable healthy oils out there. Nowadays, food manufacturers put pretty short good to dates on food. Heck, at the group home that I work at, we recently had to throw out some gallons of water because it was past date. I looked at the made date, it was only a year or so before the best by date...

Stored properly means vacuumed packed with moisture and oxygen absorbers. Would have to portion the oil in at least a few different bags.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Lazy Prepper on 10/17/2013 08:07:14 MDT Print View

If you routinely use something and it has a 2 year shelf life, then always have as much as you normally use in 2 years. When your supply is reduced by an amount that a new container is, buy a new one, just make sure and rotate stock.

You can store things like grain or fat in the freezer. It will last a lot longer. Of course there are emergency situations where you'll lose power, but then you just take it out and start using it.

Ian Van Halen
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Lazy Prepper on 10/17/2013 08:43:41 MDT Print View

"If stored properly, it will last longer than two years. Its one of the most stable healthy oils out there. Stored properly means vacuumed packed with moisture and oxygen absorbers. Would have to portion the oil in at least a few different bags."

The video I posted a link to is well worth watching. According to the guest speaker (who seems credible to me), items like Crisco which used to have an indefinite shelf life no longer does due to the new packaging. She suggested storing it in bell jars and vacuum sealing them. I suppose the same thing would apply to the coconut oil.

She also mentioned that canning your own meat will give it a 10+ year shelf life vs the <5 year shelf life of store bought canned meat.

Sounds like one of the better items for long term storage and versatility are wheat berries. Apparently this is one of those items that can be stored in buckets (with mylar bags, o2 absorbers, etc) in the garage or attic as it's fine in extreme heat/cold. Again, her words not mine but some casual googling seems to support her claims.

"If you routinely use something and it has a 2 year shelf life, then always have as much as you normally use in 2 years."

True. I'm more interested in items with a 10+ year shelf life where i can buy 30 days worth of food, store it and forget it. I figure if we have a real disaster, we could easily find another two weeks to a month's worth of meals by being creative with what we have on the shelves. Crisco isn't something that we ever use and I've never tried coconut so I'll probably pick one up to see if it's something I'd actually use or not. If we do then obviously we could do as you suggested and keep enough on hand to cover us for X months but not so much that it's expiring before it's used.

Edited by IDBLOOM on 10/17/2013 08:44:19 MDT.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Lazy Prepper on 10/17/2013 09:17:12 MDT Print View

Crisco? Is that real food? You must be joking : )

Yeah, it's convenient to put some emergency food away and forget about it for 10 years.

But if you're rotating through a couple years of some staples like flour, oatmeal, beans,... and then a disaster happens, you won't starve for a number of months

Maybe you can also have some 10 year shelf life stuff, this is just one component of your system