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Steven Adeff
(TinCanFury) - F

Locale: Boston
DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 08:06:31 MDT Print View

I have an idea for a multi-use ground blanket/winter "pad" for my dog.

Basically two materials sewn on three sides with a zipper on the fourth that will allow for a thin sheet of some synthetic insulation to be inserted in the winter. Ideally one of the materials, would have a reflective side like the reflective ripstop I've seen, for heat reflection, being a dog he produces a lot of heat, I would like to prevent him from loosing much of that to the ground.

The bottom material I imagine would need to be WPB or at least DWR, and strong enough to withstand the torture it will receive from being scratched up against whatever is on the ground. I'm thinking something like DX40, but a 1.7oz ripstop may be enough? does anyone have an idea for a WPB material that is strong, WPB, and somewhat light? It doesn't need to be bullet proof, just fairly strong.

The top material I'm a little lost for ideas on. Ideally the top side would be "soft" like the "Dryline" fabric BlackRockGear uses for it's pillow, which is my first thought, however I'm not sure how strong the backing of this material is for this use. ie. ideally a D20 or maybe even a M90 type material as the backing from strength and the softness to the touch of Dryline on the top, but more durable to getting dirty perhaps?

Thanks for the help!

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
RE: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 11:08:56 MDT Print View

OK, firstly, I like this idea! Depending on the dog, its fur may be enough for basic warmth overnight, except for heat loss from the cold ground (which this addresses).

I might be missing something here, but why does the bottom fabric need to be breathable? Wouldn't it be best to just use the lightest, most "bullet-proof" nylon you can find? Cheaper, too!

Have you thought of using a non-outdoor fabric for the top? I'm actually thinking about "ultrasuede", a synthetic that feels like soft suede, is relatively light, and can be machine washed/dried. It's also really hardy, so sharp toenails wouldn't tear it.

If you use less durable, UL fabrics, the pad is less likely to last very long...

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 11:36:15 MDT Print View

I just use some 5mm CCF foam. Same issues a people pads and no training needed. Dogs will find the soft and warm spot.

Let sleeping dogs lie!

Edited by dwambaugh on 10/04/2013 11:37:04 MDT.

Steven Adeff
(TinCanFury) - F

Locale: Boston
Re: RE: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 11:38:01 MDT Print View

yea, heat loss is only an issue when it gets really cold, he only starts to complain when it gets close to freezing, but I figure something as easy as a reflective layer and some padding will only make things more comfortable.

bottom material: it doesn't need to be breathable, which is why I was thinking DX40, but yea, a ripstop nylon may be enough.

ultrasuede: I don't see why not, is it heavy? how would it hold up to dirt and such from being outside?

"If you use less durable, UL fabrics, the pad is less likely to last very long..." that's my fear, but I also don't want to add too much weight to what he already carries...

Steven Adeff
(TinCanFury) - F

Locale: Boston
Re: Re: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 11:39:45 MDT Print View

I've tried CCF, and he refuses to lay on it, at least in warmer weather, he ends up finding a patch of leaves and laying there. if I try and put the foam pad at that spot he just finds another spot. I don't know why, but he just won't do it. He will, at home, sleep on the 1/2" memory foam dog pads I found at Ocean State Job Lot, so I'm hoping something softer like a synthetic insulation will be enough to make him happy.

What I've been using recently that he likes is the paw-print for my Nemo tent, which weighs >1lb, thus my thoughts on this solution. It's a soft material which I think he likes.

Sharon J.
(squark) - F

Locale: SF Bay area
Re: Re: Re: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 11:46:49 MDT Print View

No advice, unfortunately, but I'll be watching this thread closely. I brought a 3/8" inch CCF for my dog, but whenever I got up, she'd move onto my sleeping pad. Plan for the moment is to cut down a cheap old self-inflating pad, but that'll likely still be heavy.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Ultrasuede on 10/04/2013 11:49:21 MDT Print View

Ultrasuede is totally easy care - machine wash/dry, and it's stain-resistant and doesn't collect hairs (like, say, fleece!). It's mid-to-light weight, lighter than a brushed vinyl, which would also be a great choice because it's indestructible (!) but heavier. The down-side of ultrasuede is that it's expensive...but you don't need a lot of yardage (and you could always sneak a seam (flat felled) down the middle to buy less fabric.

Not sure how big your dog is, but 1 square yard should probably be enough, in which case the relative weight savings would be minor.

Hope you post a photo when it's done (with the pup, ideally)!

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 12:34:13 MDT Print View

I wish I could get away with what you are doing.
My dog sleeps just as cold as I do.

This has a 1/4" pad with over 2 1/2" loft.
Not bad for 8 ounces.vg

Steven Adeff
(TinCanFury) - F

Locale: Boston
Re: Re: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 12:36:16 MDT Print View

hehe, top quilt is my next project! he has a fully body wind/waterproof fleece jacket that he wears "to sleep" in in the winter.

Brock Graves
(gravesbrock) - F

Locale: asheville nc
Re: Re: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 13:23:33 MDT Print View

This is just the thing I need to do for my dog, looks like the same size even. What did you use?

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: Re: Re: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials on 10/04/2013 14:06:41 MDT Print View

It is 20" X 24" on the bottom with fabric sew on both sides of a 1/4" closed cell pad.

The top is around 24" X 30". I folded the 2 back corners of the top together up about 6' so the top would be elevated and be about the same size as the bottom.
Then I sewed the front corners in just enough so the dog can get into. She also has enough room to turn around and the top completely encompasses he she lays down.

She's goo to about 35 degrees without wearing a jacket.
My other dog is good to about 40 degrees without anything.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Too Cute!!!! on 10/04/2013 14:33:38 MDT Print View

Sorry, Aaron, but I just have to say it -- that photo is WAAAAAAAY too cute! :~)

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
dog pad on 10/04/2013 23:17:12 MDT Print View

Steven,
Got tired of the dogs trying to borrow space on my sleeping pad and having to loan my puffies to them when the weather turned foul, so tried to come up with something quick this past summer. Tried cutting up some yoga mats from Wmart, but the result was too heavy. So got to work.

The bottom was Thru-Hiker silnylon because it is very waterproof, light and strong.
Put sil chevrons on the bottom like those on my sleeping pad.

The insulation was primaloft - don't know how much, but laid it on thick.

The top was a 2.5 oz/sq/yd epic treated water resistant/breathable nylon bought years ago but never used. It is pleasant to the touch and not slippery.

The pads sort of worked, but they tended to bunch up under the dogs so they didn't get the full benefit of the insulation.

So the next step is to find some kind of light but very flexible stiffener that will keep the pads from bunching up. Bought some stuff at JoAnn's Fabrics that might work.

Was in a hurry, so rather than installing zippers, just sewed the pads closed over the insulation around the edges and across the center. That also stabilized the insulation. Will just remove that stitch line that crosses the center of the pad, insert the stiffener cut to shape, and resew the pads shut. Hope that works.

The stiffened pads won't roll up quite as slim as the originals, but should be more effective in keeping the dogs warm when it gets cold and wet. The Epic treatment should keep the insulation inside from getting soaked.

My experience over the years is that the dogs don't need anything on top even when wet because they have lots of fur (Shelties). It is the cold ground that sucks out the heat from under them. Loved the pic of the dog bivy though.

Edited by scfhome on 10/04/2013 23:27:42 MDT.

Matthew Perry
(bigfoot2) - F

Locale: Oregon
DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials" on 10/05/2013 11:28:59 MDT Print View

I use a Gossamer Gear pad for my dog as bottom insulation for him and for frame support in my pack during hiking, and have two synthetic (dog)top quilts made by Tim Marshall at enLIGHTened Equipment that I use as my dogs top quilt insulation. The quilts split equally in half for packing into his dog pack so the weight distribution is equal. The grey/black top quilt is a three season and the Orange one is more of a winter quilt. The orange one is actually a modified Prodigy kids quilt Tim sells with an added split zipper in the middle. It can be folded in half while the dog is wearing it, snapped under his belly and then becomes a super puffy dog parka. Both quilts will also double as 3/4 hammock under quilts just in case something happens to my main hammock under quilt. These quilts and pad, along with a fleece or soft shell dog jacket will take my hiking buddy through all four seasons with ease. I can't say enough about Tim's work. These quilts have held up for years (since 2007!) and are still going strong.

3 season: 12.7 ounces
4 season: 16.4 ounces
Gossamer Gear Sit Light pad, torso length: 4.55 - 4.90 oz.



dog

dog

dog

dog

dog

dog

dog

dog

dog

Edited by bigfoot2 on 10/05/2013 11:51:41 MDT.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
What a lucky dog!!! on 10/05/2013 13:09:58 MDT Print View

More adorable pup pics -- what a great thread! :~)

Matthew Perry
(bigfoot2) - F

Locale: Oregon
DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials" on 10/06/2013 18:47:50 MDT Print View

I've never been called a "Pup" before, but, uh...thanks!

Matt

pup

Edited by bigfoot2 on 10/06/2013 18:49:29 MDT.

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
DIY dog pad/ground blanket, on 10/06/2013 19:55:54 MDT Print View

Love all the doggie pictures! Dale, that shot is precious! Matt, Bennie is as cute as ever!

I used a GG Nightlite torso length pad under my late lamented hiking buddy Hysson and on cold nights put a thin fleece jacket on him, cut down from an old fleece jacket of mine. Fleece is great because you can put it on a wet dog--it will keep him warm and let his wet coat dry, yet because the fleece doesn't absorb water, it keeps the wet fur from rubbing against your sleeping bag. His hair kept him warm down to about 40*F, but below that he needed help. Labs have a thick downy undercoat, but all indoor dogs need some help coping with lower temps.

For a dog with a thinner coat, a rain coat is in order, as is a heavier fleece jacket.

Steven, have you tried a fleece layer on top of the CCF pad? It's amazing how finicky a dog can be. Hysson, of course, far preferred to sleep on my $$$ WM down bag. No way I would let him! My grandkids (now that they're in or close to their teens) have size long down bags, so there is a lot of unused bag at the foot. Hysson always moved to the foot of their bags during the night. Fortunately the shell material on their bags (REI SubKilo bought on sale) is not as delicate as the shell on my WM bag.

Edited by hikinggranny on 10/06/2013 20:06:19 MDT.

Steven Adeff
(TinCanFury) - F

Locale: Boston
Re: DIY dog pad/ground blanket, on 10/07/2013 07:50:57 MDT Print View

Mr Perry:
how does the quilt "attach" to the pooch? I may have to contact Tim about getting one. I'll see how he does with just ground insulation and his fleece.

Mary:
I have not, which is how this idea came about. I know in "warmer" weather he likes to sleep randomly wherever, and I thought just a standard ground blanket would be nice so I threw the Nemo pawprint in his bag and he loved it. It's heavy and big so I wanted to make something smaller. I though at that point I may as well sew two pieces of material together and leave one side open (I'm thinking velcro now instead of a zipper) to allow some sort of insulation material to be inserted in between for when it gets cold.

Whether that ends up being CCF, or Apex, or, whatever.

Brock Graves
(gravesbrock) - F

Locale: asheville nc
Dog quilt on 10/07/2013 08:01:32 MDT Print View

I contacted mr. Marshall a couple weeks ago after spotting mr Perry's post about his dog quilt that was on al older post. Mr. Marshall preferred not to produce a replica of mr Perry's dog quilt as it was fairly labor intensive but, did offer to make a square cut to size per the dimensions that I would need. Or he recommended one of his under quilts.
I'm still weighing my options between going that route vs picking up an adult full size quilt that could be used by my gf vs a kids prodigy.

Matthew Perry
(bigfoot2) - F

Locale: Oregon
DIY dog pad/ground blanket, advice requested on materials" on 10/07/2013 19:10:25 MDT Print View

Brock,
Keep pestering Tim...he'll give in if it'$ worth his while. Or if more of a demand for them starts. It would be really easy to take his kid's quilt and modify it with a zipper down the middle. Let me know if you need help or direction if you decide to go that route.

Steven,
My dog's quilt does not attach to the pad. No need for it to, as my dog is not very mobile once the sun goes down (like Scooby Doo, he's scared of the dark!). Being a dog, he does not like a confined feeling that a sleeping bag or quilt attached to a pad would produce (i've tried before). He LOVES the quilt/pad combo, though. He sleeps under my hammock and gets up once a night, maybe, to go pee. It's never been a problem, as he just plops back down on the pad and I cover him back up again. The pad insulates from the cold ground, he has the top quilt for warmth, and wears a fleece or doggy soft-shell that keeps it from being too drafty. Good system for my pooch. YPMMV (Your Pooch's Mileage May Vary).

Matt

Edited by bigfoot2 on 10/07/2013 19:11:48 MDT.