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Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review
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Maia Jordan
(maia) - MLife

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review on 09/17/2013 21:25:30 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review on 09/17/2013 21:40:34 MDT Print View

Thanks for the time and effort on the review. It would be nice to see manufactures build a longer lasting shoe. Especially with the cost per pair. 200 miles is mighty short.

and make more shoes available in a 15. please.

Edited by kthompson on 09/18/2013 06:11:25 MDT.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
approach shoes on 09/18/2013 04:11:10 MDT Print View

if yr constantly on granite and limestone scrambles ... get approach shoes

the more durable uppers, and sticky rubber makes a difference

and they arent that "heavy", in some cases LIGHTER ... compare my size 8 guide tennies at 346g/shoe vs my inov8 size 8.5 terroc at 349g

the tennies uppers is much more durable with leather, a durable toe box ... has sticky climbing rubber ... the only problem is that the traction sucks in the mud due to the tread pattern, and it takes forever to dry

i think that too many consumers these days trade away durability in shoes these days for perceived "performance" ... BPL is littered with threads of shoes that seem to be worn out prematurely

;)

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Re Approach Shoes on 09/18/2013 05:43:17 MDT Print View

Eric I'm not a climber but I don't think I've ever seen an approach shoe wit a wide toe box or zero drop. The Altras are the only shoes that have that and enough protection for me carrying a load on a rough trail. So for now I'll be buying Altras like Ryan till something more durable comes along.

Mike Bozman
(myarmisonfire) - M

Locale: BC
Similar experience on 09/18/2013 07:26:09 MDT Print View

I bought some Lone Peaks back in May (not sure which version) and they were the worst best shoes I have ever had. Amazingly comfortable! Unfortunately with about 100 km on them they were toast. That was one 32 km day hike and one 26 km overnight hike. The rest of the distance was a few short walks with the family and a bit of around town walking. The midsole of the right shoe disintegrated. I would almost describe it as deflating under the heel! To make a long story short, after sharing pictures and describing the problem with Altra they basically said tough luck and wouldn't warranty them. If they sort out the quality and durability I won't buy one pair I'll probably buy 3 as they really were that good for the short time I had them.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: Re Approach Shoes on 09/18/2013 07:30:28 MDT Print View

Eric I'm not a climber but I don't think I've ever seen an approach shoe wit a wide toe box or zero drop. The Altras are the only shoes that have that and enough protection for me carrying a load on a rough trail. So for now I'll be buying Altras like Ryan till something more durable comes along.

thats your call if you really want something with 0 drop ... plenty of approach shoes have a wide toe box

but put it this way ... if those shoes are slipping on easy/moderate slab when the front sole wears out ... thats not very safe IMO

if yr scrambling theres plenty of places where to slip and fall is to die

approach shoes should have no problems even when totally worn on easy slab, in fact you get better friction when the lugs wear out as theres more surface contact

ive mine on this ...



when they were worn down to this ...



for trails its irrelevant ... but when your basically scrambling on granite and limestone slabs/blocks ... this is what approach shoes were made to do ...



;)

Edited by bearbreeder on 09/18/2013 07:36:31 MDT.

Chris W
(simplespirit) - MLife

Locale: .
Re: Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review on 09/18/2013 08:11:52 MDT Print View

I have no experience with the Lone Peak 1.5, but am currently using the Superior which is less shoe and will be doing a review on another site.

Over the past month I've put 131 mixed miles on them with 76 being trail and 55 being road. The trail miles have been a mix of hardpack, 1-2" gravel, larger rocks, solid rock, exposed roots, and some man-made steps/ladders. The road miles are mostly asphalt with some concrete. Thus far, the outsoles show very little wear. Not applicable to wear but may be of interest to some - all but one 20.6 mile trail run have been without the insole or rock plate. I did the same 20.6 mile loop back to back weeekends, one without the plate/insole and one with. The combination definitely helps with foot fatigue and deep muscle/ligament soreness when running over those 1-2" stones, but the additional stiffness creates its own issues (at least for my feet).

I did just notice the piece of the sole that wraps up on to the toe box is starting to pull off a bit at the edges:



Minor sole wear.







Upper:



Excuse the lower quality cellphone photos. The review will have better ones, but I wanted to get some quick shots.

Edited by simplespirit on 09/18/2013 08:27:57 MDT.

Eugene Smith
(Eugeneius) - MLife

Locale: Nuevo Mexico
Re: Re: Re Approach Shoes on 09/18/2013 10:07:55 MDT Print View

Eric

Approach shoes are a bit of a one trick pony with the exception of a few offerings that might make decent dayhike shoes with more technicality on slab. Multi day backpacks on routes with wide surface variation? I think there are better options than approach shoes. The use of sticky rubber shoes allows for great slabbing on short approach hikes from car to the crag, but are pretty shitty for just about everything else considering most of the shoes that incorporate stealth rubber have relatively flat outsoles. Holding the Lone Peaks up to an approach shoes ability to negotiate granite and easy class climbing and bouldering is slighlty lopsided, considering the shoe was intended to be a running shoe, one that works very well within that context. The Lone Peak in the context of backpacking appears to be up to the task for the most part, with the drawbacks being long term durability.


Please, show me "plenty" of approach shoes that: dry quickly, use lightweight/breathable materials, allow natural movement of the feet, well rounded traction for varying surfaces, and all day comfort with a pack on for several days on repeat. There is always going to be a compromise in footwear when dealing with outdoor footwear. Anyone can pull an example out of thin air of a shoe that excels in one discipline. Approach shoes are very much a niche in the market.

I've seen very few approach shoes from the climbing world that successfully check all of those boxes off.

The La Sportiva Anakonda may be the closest shoe I've seen recently that provides superior traction for a variety of mountain terrain in a lightweight minimal package suitable for low class scrambling, hiking, trail running, etc.. I'd pick the Anakonda over the Lone Peak, and definitely over an approach shoe.

J W
(jhaura) - F

Locale: www.Trailability.com
Re: Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review on 09/18/2013 10:19:33 MDT Print View

I've been very happy with the Altra Superiors, have about 300 miles on them. Seems like they have a better upper in terms of protection and durability, plus I like the styling more. Lots of use in the Sierras. I cut off the mud flap on the back straight away as it launches sand all the way up into one's waistline.

Altra Superiors 2013 model:
shoes

Wes Kline
(weskline) - F

Locale: Adirondacks
Lone Peaks in ADK High Peaks on 09/18/2013 10:38:23 MDT Print View

In June of this year I used a pair of Lone Peak 1.5 in the High Peaks of the Adirondacks. While the shoe was comfortable (I use Altra shoes for road running as well, as I have very wide feet), I found the traction to be pretty awful in the wet ADK landscape. I usually use Scarpa Sparks, and found that the Altra slipped on so many wet rocks that they were quite dangerous to use. I don't have the same problems with the Spark.

So I would recommend them for a dry climate, or possibly the Rockies, but for the wet Adirondacks, they were less than ideal. Love the width though, and wish more manufacturers would offer shoes with a similar last.

billy weinman
(bubbyman) - M

Locale: Manzano Mtns
175 miles and they have some issues on 09/18/2013 11:35:22 MDT Print View

I have just completed two 75-mile backpacks through the Manzanos, San Mateos and Magdalena mountains of New Mexico. Trails and cross-country at times. It's been a test for me and the Lone Peaks.

I love wearing the shoe, but my chief and immediate complaint was with the toe guard. Not tough enough for southwest conditions. Won't stop a prickly pear spine and on two occasions had to remove the shoe and tweezer out a gnarly spine from both left and right shoes. We have lots of pricklies that live just out of sight along our trails, and this is what nailed me. I think maybe only leather could have stopped them.

I'm also seeing the fabric on top of the shoe wearing and the review is correct in that they are very slow to dry.

Like the author, despite complaints, they remain a wonderful shoe to wear.

Jeffrey Stone
(stonepitts) - MLife

Locale: Klamath Knot
Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review on 09/18/2013 11:45:38 MDT Print View

Ryan, my experience with the Lone Peaks has been the same as yours. I have a pair of 1.0's and a pair of 1.5's, and I love them for trail running, trail hiking, and general all around use. For off-trail hiking, they're not so great. My biggest issue is poor traction. I just got a pair of Sketchers GOBionics to try out. They have similar attributes as the Altras: wide footbox, zero drop (without the insoles), and light weight (3 ounces each lighter than the 1.5's, sans insoles). They are also significantly less expensive. I haven't given them a good test yet; they are very comfortable so far, and the tread pattern is more aggressive than the Lone Peaks so I'm thinking the traction will be better. The light weight worries me a bit as far as durability goes, but we'll see.

Edited by stonepitts on 09/18/2013 11:46:25 MDT.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Re: Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review on 09/18/2013 12:41:52 MDT Print View

Ryan- thanks for the review. I tried on a pair and they felt great- I have to have a wide toe box and they have that in spades. In the end I was a little uncomfortable w/ a 0 drop (maybe needlessly). Another shoe to look at that might better fit the bill is the Pearl Izumi N2 Trail. Wide toe box, low drop, but not 0, lightweight and they dry fast. I've got ~ 250 miles on mine including two very rocky 50k's, also some rather rough miles w/ a 20-ish # pack. I'd say they'll do another 250 w/o too much trouble.

The outsole isn't as aggressive as some trail shoes, but I have no complaint on grip w/ rock or any other surface- wet or dry.

Craig Gulley
(cgulley) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Lone Peak and Golite Sundragons on 09/18/2013 12:56:21 MDT Print View

I had high hopes for the Lone Peaks having read Anish used them on her 40+ miles per day, 60 day PCT hike. I was especially interested in them because of the expanded toe box. The old Golite Sundragons had this feature and I considered them the best fitting shoe ever made, too bad it ended there because they disintegrated the moment you put them on the trail. Maybe someday some will take this superior style of last and make it out of durable material. If only I could get LaSportiva to make a shoe like the Raptors I currently use with a larger toe box!

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: Re: Re: Re Approach Shoes on 09/18/2013 13:08:26 MDT Print View

Approach shoes are a bit of a one trick pony with the exception of a few offerings that might make decent dayhike shoes with more technicality on slab. Multi day backpacks on routes with wide surface variation? I think there are better options than approach shoes. The use of sticky rubber shoes allows for great slabbing on short approach hikes from car to the crag, but are pretty shitty for just about everything else considering most of the shoes that incorporate stealth rubber have relatively flat outsoles. Holding the Lone Peaks up to an approach shoes ability to negotiate granite and easy class climbing and bouldering is slighlty lopsided, considering the shoe was intended to be a running shoe, one that works very well within that context. The Lone Peak in the context of backpacking appears to be up to the task for the most part, with the drawbacks being long term durability.

ahhh ... but i did mention approach shoes are SPECIFICALLY for what are basically scrambles ... places where your rubber cant slip or yr screwed, excuse the pun

for trails theres plenty of other options ...

but you do have to remember that there is plenty of wiggle room in "approach shoes" ... some have a deeper tread pattern, most are quite durable

most though do have upper leathers, though there are a few with mesh

in reality they are not too different from light hikers many people use, but with better traction on rock and better climbing

the point is simply if youre going to be using trail runners shoes in boulder fields, scree, slabs, rock faces,jamming them into easy cracks, etc ... they will get TRASHED

now fit is a personal choice, but ask yourself if theres another shoe that isnt more durable, that wouldnt work just as well for what you want to do

if youre using a shoe in high wear/abrasion activities ... perhaps something a bit tougher, and im not saying get boots, would be in order?

;)

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Re Re Re Re Re Approach Shoes on 09/18/2013 16:44:13 MDT Print View

Eric I definitely would consider and approach shoe on slick rock. However I don't hike on that very often. Funny someone mentioned the Adirondacks. I only did one overnighter there but that would have been the perfect place for an approach shoe.

So for now I'm stuck with Lone Peaks. My ideal shoe would be an Altra with more durable uppers and the sole of the old La Sportiva X-Countries.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: Re Re Re Re Re Approach Shoes on 09/18/2013 17:46:15 MDT Print View

im actually really puzzled why manufacturers dont make their trail runners more "durable" ... it wouldnt weight much more in many cases if anything ...

i understand that with regular use in harsh environments, things wear out much more quickly ... but it seems that everyone and their dog on BPL has issues with runners wearing out with moderate use ...

i remember when i was young, we use to go scrambling around in our gym sneakers ... and those things lasted forever, once my feet stopped growing i dont think i ever wore out a pair of cheap sneakers even after a decade of use ... course i suspect that even the cheap tennies shoes back then were much simpler and better constructed than the $$$$ "performance shoes" these days

personally i think manufacturers KNOW that their shoes will wear out quickly and do a bit of "planned obsolescences" ... the more shoes you but the better ... as long as you believe that nothing else will "work" as well, youll be willing to pay the piper every few months ...

it sure seems that theres more of a marketing focus than real utility ... plenty of fancy colours, logo/pretty cutouts that falls apart, weird graphic designs on the sole that serve no purpose, etc ....

honestly ... just build me a simple, functional shoe that works .... i dont need the marketing department to tell me there ooogles of cushioning, or that itll make me into a barefoot kenyan runner ...

they still go kaput of course ... but after getting good use out of em

;)

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Re: Re Re Re Re Re Approach Shoes on 09/18/2013 18:04:15 MDT Print View

I want to see shoe manufactures going to back to sewn on soles. No more sole delamination and very easy to repair.
I usually wear leather shoes for any situation where the uppers are going to take more abuse than the soles. Leather sucks in wet conditions but everything else is just mesh that shreds.
Why is nobody creating shoes with a simple nylon/cordura fabric for the uppers?
It seems like shoe manufactures expect everyone to be walking on well groomed trails.

Jeremy Gustafson
(gustafsj) - MLife

Locale: Minneapolis
Re: Minimalist hiking shoes on 09/18/2013 19:44:23 MDT Print View

Russell Mocassin makes a custom minimalist leather hiking shoe or boot that has reports of going 1200 miles on a pair of soles and then can be re-soled. Certainly not as lightweight, but much more durable. I have not used them myself yet, but have read good reviews on them. They are zero-drop, wide foot box and customizable for cushioning, fit and type of sole. Yes, they are expensive and won't dry out as fast as a trail runner, but maybe they would be willing to make them out of a leather and cordura combination so that they could dry faster.

Monty Montana
(TarasBulba) - MLife

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Minimalist hiking shoes on 09/18/2013 21:37:06 MDT Print View

I bought a pair of Lone Peaks after reading Ryan's original article and found them to be very comfortable on some of the moderate, maintained trails in Montana's Anaconda Pintlar Wilderness; however, they were absolute crap on the steep talus of the Porter Ridge approach to Warren Peak. When traversing, my foot would actually slip off the foot bed and end up half-way on the fabric of the upper; this I believe was due in large part to the lack of a stiff heel cup, and if I tried to tighten the laces to prevent my foot from sliding around, then this caused pain on the instep area. Also, because of a total lack of lateral support, crossing steep snow fields was near suicidal because it was impossible to "edge" the shoes.

In short, these are great for day hikes or short overnighters on maintained trails, but a more substantial shoe is required for serious backcountry travel. In other words, be circumspect, and don't expect one shoe fulfill all the needs.

Happy Trails!

J C
(Joomy) - M
Re: Re: Re Re Re Re Re Approach Shoes on 09/20/2013 17:48:41 MDT Print View

>approach shoes should have no problems even when totally worn on easy slab, in fact you get better friction when the lugs wear out as theres more surface contact

Friction should be proportional to the force you apply to the surface not dependent on surface area. Lugs make it a lot easier to grab small features with harder rubber.

>im actually really puzzled why manufacturers dont make their trail runners more "durable" ... it wouldnt weight much more in many cases if anything ...

I'm guessing it's so they can sell more shoes. They're probably trying to hit the imagined sweet spot between making people angry that their shoe has worn out too fast and proud that they've worn out a pair of shoes. A year of moderate use is probably what they're shooting for, which would probably satisfy most people. They are clearly not designed with professional outdoors-people in mind.

Tony Ronco
(tr-browsing) - MLife
Re: Re: Re Re Re Re Re Approach Shoes on 09/20/2013 19:04:57 MDT Print View

> "Friction should be proportional to the force you apply to the surface not dependent on surface area. Lugs make it a lot easier to grab small features with harder rubber."

Just a FYI ... that's right most of the time ... however there are applications where it is not...


So, surface area doesn't matter in terms of friction IF the contact surfaces DON'T deform ...

... BUT contact surface area can indeed matter, IF the contact surfaces DO deform (or there is molecular adhesion).

For approach shoes whose soft rubber soles obviously deform to granite ... it is the effects of the deformation on friction, that brings the consideration of the contact surface area into the equation ... usually as a term within the coefficient of friction.

Dean L
(AldoLeopold) - F

Locale: Great Lakes
Re: approach shoes on 09/20/2013 19:53:31 MDT Print View

I wear Saucony Peregrines for lighter soil/sandy hikes and Five Ten Camp 4 approach shoes for smoothrock/scree/rocky trails. Seems to work out well.

Dean

John Coyle
(Bigsac)

Locale: NorCal
Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review on 09/20/2013 20:29:27 MDT Print View

I hike and backpack in the Sierra, and sometimes the lower Cascade, ranges of Northern California, mostly on trail, but with some class 2 and 3 scrambling. I know shoes are a personal thing, but it's La Sportiva Wildcat's all the way for me. Don't have to worry as much about the sides blowing out because they are essentially all mesh, although it leads to a little side bruising of the feet if a person isn't careful. The soles are amazingly supportive also. If they ever discontinue that shoe I will be extremely displeased. Do you hear that La Sportiva?

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: Re: Re: Re Re Re Re Re Approach Shoes on 09/21/2013 10:45:51 MDT Print View

Jeremy ..

i climb slab all the time. Usually multipitch. In yosemite and squamish. Up to the 5.10 ish range.

For climbing applications, the lugs serve no purpose, you will never see actual climbing shoes with lugs.

They reduce the surface contact when smearing or edging ... Think race car tires, they have little to no tread for a reason...

Companies like 5.10 know this which is why for some of their "performance" approach shoes they have flat fronts and lugs only at the back.

The problem with using many trail shoes on boulders and slabs is that the friction of the rubber honestly sucks ...

Im not saying you cant do it, but if you feel yourself slipping on friction slab when the rubber is flat, ie when you should have the most surface contact, then its might be time to consider some other shoe

Some trail shoes such as the terroc are known to have stickyish rubber and work decently for such applications if you dont want approach shoes .... They are a bit more durable as well

If yr depending on lugs on actual rock, something is wrong IMO

Rock Climbing shoes have no lugs ...

Heres an easy way to practice .... Find some angled smooth rock and stand in yr runners on the ball of yr foot ... Hands free

Find the angle at which the rubber fails ... Thats the point at which yr screwed

;)

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Another Option on 09/21/2013 12:28:30 MDT Print View

I'm one who uses the Alras because nothing else really works for my feet (I've tried lots of other shoes).

One shoe I just saw is the Merrell Ascend Glove. Looks like a beefed up Trail Glove. I'll probably try a pair of those next to see what I think. They are mesh so they'll have similar issues with the upper but the vibrum sole might last longer.

Glen Van Peski
(gvanpeski) - F - M

Locale: San Diego
Love my Lone Peaks on 09/22/2013 09:26:56 MDT Print View

I had both the previous versions and recently the new 1.5. Finding the Lone Peaks ended a 5-year search for a backpacking shoe. Apart from the top of the wrap-around toe becoming unglued, actually on both versions, I have had no issues with the shoes. I have had the new versions out on several trips, from SEKI trails to Enchantments granite and have been extremely pleased with their performance. I don't carry much weight, so can't comment on additional wear from backpacking with heavy packs.

Adam Kilpatrick
(oysters) - MLife

Locale: South Australia
Proactive durability modifications on 09/24/2013 01:44:11 MDT Print View

Hi All

wondering if anyone has any techniques for lightweight modifications that could enhance the long term durability of trail runners? For example, putting some kind of coating (normal super-glue?) over stiching lines to help them to repel water/increase long term strength, etc. Or glueing on some nylon patches over mesh areas that you know aren't going to last a long distance. I've considered this many times when I've bought trail runners for bushwalking in Aus. There are times when I wish I had done it, especially on the mesh toe boxes...they pour in dirt and in some bushwacking, particularly spinifex country, my toes cop a lot of abuse from spines.

Maybe Ryan could try some of these things, as well as a bunch of BPL'ers, and collate experiences for an article? It seems shoes such as the Altra 1.5 are probably a very good candidate for such pre-emptive treatment; they have relatively limited durability, yet due to their other features are very popular and just keep getting bought and used over and over again and again.

Probably not much that can be done DIY to reduce sole wear, but upper issues are relatively easily solved. Ryan's suggestion of drilling drainage holes for example (people have long done this for wet environments).

Cheers,
Adam

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
re: shoe mods on 09/24/2013 07:31:01 MDT Print View

Aquaseal is your friend. Take your brand-new shoes and lightly coat stitch lines, the junction between the sole and upper from the midfoot forward, the edges of any rands or overlays, and an especially thin coating over both sides where the metatarsal bends will occur. Add more at wear spots as they develop.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
Re: Proactive durability modifications on 09/24/2013 12:42:20 MDT Print View

1. seam grip every exposed stitch

2. seam grip where the rubber joins the leather

3. the moment you see wear on the mesh, seam grip that too

4. the moment u see breaks in the rubber, shoo goo that

5. take some athletic tape and put a thin layer in the heel cup

and finally at a certain point ... tell yourself how silly it is to keep going through shoes this fast ... and then buy them again because they are the "best"

;)

marvin barg
(Grampa_Kilt) - MLife

Locale: British Columbia
Lone Peak Love Affair For Better or For Worse on 10/02/2013 13:54:23 MDT Print View

There lie my Lone Peaks in the corner of the laundry room, the forefoot horribly misshapen, grips worn completely down on the lateral edges (no over-pronation support there) and yes, they suck on slippery surfaces, always have. Yet I will buy them again because I can now hike, walk or work in them all day and not feel pain. Nor have I turned my ankle since wearing them. One has to realize they were designed for running a 100 mile race, probably only once before tossing them, and not for long distance U/L hiking.

Perhaps one day, the U/L hiking community will grow enough so that Altra will cater to this emerging market. Until then, thanks to those who wrote how to prolong the life of this shoe. As for slippery slopes, looks like the Lone Peaks will always have to paired with hiking sticks. GK

Jeffrey Stone
(stonepitts) - MLife

Locale: Klamath Knot
Lone Peaks on 10/02/2013 16:17:37 MDT Print View

I've found my Lone Peaks to be quite durable. I have over 300 running miles, a 100 mile PCT backpack trip, and countless shorter hikes on them and they are still serviceable. The most comfortable shoes I've ever owned.

Bill Townsend
(Olmanwilly) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
still a fan on 10/15/2013 22:10:33 MDT Print View

I am sad to report the same findings as Ryan. Best shoe I've ever used...until it's not. I did have good luck with the Torin's (the road version of the Lone Peak) They held up fairly well hiking in the Midwest and southern portions of the AT. I had no problem getting 400 miles on them there. The Latest pair of LP's made it a few hundred miles on easy stuff with no complaints- but 100 miles on the Long Trail and they were in bad shape.

Karl Riters
(kriters) - M

Locale: Colorado Front Range
Strategically drilled 1/8" diameter holes" to optimize water exit. on 01/31/2014 07:40:00 MST Print View

• Water Absorption and Dry Time - A change was made to the upper fabric that seems to have decreased water absorption in the v1.5, and the change seems to be positive with respect to dry time. That said, v1.5 remains a pretty sloshy shoe after river crossings, due primarily to its inability to pump water out of the shoe. You’ll have to upgrade your v1.5’s with a few strategically drilled 1/8” diameter holes in the footbed and sole if you want to optimize water exit.

Before I trash my new Lone Peak 1.5s with inappropriate 1/8" holes, would like advice from Ryan or anyone else as to where to drill "a few strategically placed 1/8" diameter holes" to optimize water exit.

SPIRIDON Papapetroy
(spotlight) - F
What Altra Lone Peak is missing... on 04/28/2014 03:22:21 MDT Print View

is a protective rubber rand like the Inov-8 roclite series, trailroc 255 and Merrell Tuff
http://www.inov-8.com/New/Global/Product-View-Trailroc-255-Grey-Blue.html?L=26&A=Trail&G=Male
http://outsidetimes.com/gear/merrell-mix-master-tuff-trail-running-shoe-review-4869/
I have the Lone Peak 1 and haven't bought yet version 1.5 because of this. The white piece of leather in the medial side in version 1.5 is totally useless. I am disappointed by the upper of the upcoming Lone Peak 2
http://espn.go.com/espnw/athletes-life/slideshow/10583872/5/altra-lone-peak-20-120-july-2014
the upper looks like a minimal road shoe and certainly not a trail. No protection at all. I love the Lone Peak for zero drop and wide toebox, but Altra should consider more protection from sharp rocks and scree around the shoe.I have tried the Trailroc 255 but i don't like the heel raise of 6mm and it also has a "flat" feel meaning that after standing or walking i had a pain in the area between the arch and the ball of my feet and also under the heel. I feel the lugs too much. So i am between the Lone Peak 1.5 and some other trail shoes that are cushioned and zero drop.
Another choice is the Topo MT trail
http://gearist.com/2014/03/07/review-mt-mountain-trainer-trail-running-shoes-topo-athletic/
some have reported significant arch support and it is not very breathable, it has a yellow fabric that reaches the toebox, not letting air pass through.
The upcoming Merrell Bare access trail is another option, also zero drop with cushion, and with a protective rubber rand, check here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVW0kXglw9s
A very interesting article "Why trail shoes need to get randy"
http://nearlyshoeless.com/2014/03/15/why-trail-shoes-need-to-get-randy/
Check out this comment on altra website about the abrasion guard:
http://www.altrarunning.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ReviewDisplayView?langId=-1&storeId=15151&catalogId=18952&categoryId=75503&productId=305751&reviewId=1027979

Edited by spotlight on 04/28/2014 03:40:38 MDT.

Luke Beveridge
(lukebeveridge) - M
Altra Lone Peak 1.5 Trail Shoe Review on 05/14/2014 00:13:04 MDT Print View

I just purchased a pair of 1.0's and out of the box they are the most comfortable shoes i have ever worn. I've worn so many types of trail runners (Salomon, Inov8, Merrell, Brooks) and i'm totally sold on the Altras already. The Inov8 TrailRoc had been my favourite, and they are fantastic backpacking shoes but the Lone Peak takes the comfort to another level.

I'll be wearing them for about 10km per day of basic walking on well graded trails and will be keeping an eye on how they last.

They are a little sloppy around the heel cup which doesn't seem to have any reinforcement in it - i was wondering if the 1.5 heel cup is any different from the 1.0?

Overall i couldn't be happier with the Lone Peak. I don't know if it's just clever marketing by Altra but seeing so many long distance hikers (Snorkel, Lint etc) wearing Lone Peak's holds alot of weight for me.

I'll be looking for 1.5's down the track and 2.0's, 2.5's... for sure!

TrailRoc v Lone Peak